Howard

Connoisseur
I grew up eating dessert for breakfast. My mother was not a morning person and allowed me to eat anything I wanted as long as I left her alone, got it for myself and cleaned up (and made no noise). Nine out of ten times, I ate sugary cereals (she bought me anything that meant I'd leave her alone in the morning) or leftover dessert. Cake, cookies, candy, etc., were all just a normal breakfast for me. While I eat much better now, every so often, I'll just have a piece of cake or handful of cookies to start the day.
For me breakfast was considered cereal, eggs, muffins or waffles and a cup coffee with a glass of OJ or apple juice.
 

David J. Cooper

Super Member
old Sarge. Being the worst kind of wine snob, I tend to look up the wines people mention. The only Naylor wine I could find on CT was a wine from Pennsylvania. How was it?
 

drpeter

Super Member
For me breakfast was considered cereal, eggs, muffins or waffles and a cup coffee with a glass of OJ or apple juice.
I grew up eating dosas, idlis, , uppuma, pooris, chappatis, and delicious curries and coconut chutneys to eat them with. All of which I now make at home. Yes, an egg now and then, and sometimes, bread or toast. Things changed a lot after coming to the States. In this country, I enjoy all kinds of Western breakfasts, including eggs, bacon, sausage, smoked ham. and Jarslberg, Gouda and other fine cheeses.

A great Indo-Anglian breakfast? Kedgeree -- which is leftover fish (flaked) served with leftover rice heated up, plus spices and dal (lentils). Maybe eggs on top. Another personal favourite: Bacon sandwiches, with thick cut bacon and drippings in warm fresh rolls, wrapped in paper and eaten after the sandwich "ripens". Home-made apricot chutney ( my own recipe ) on the side. Strong Indian tea.

When I lived in Holland, the Dutch, as always, reversed breakfast and lunch. Ontbijt, or breakfast, was breads, cold cuts, preserves, and so on. For lunch they often had an omelette! Everyone carries on so about French cheese, but Dutch cheeses are every bit as good IMHO.

I'm getting hungry and there is at least a few hours to go before a potluck Easter brunch with my closest friends: I am making apricot/almond scones, served with apricot jam.

May I wish all of my friends here a lovely Easter day?
 
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