Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
Why is it heraldry? Coats of arms aren't identical to regimental colours. Besides, practically everyone, other than you, Peaks, calls it stripes when it comes to neckties.
Correct, ties have little to do with heraldry, but a great deal to do with the origin of the nomenclature. Diagonal lines are bends whether on ties or a zebra's ass.

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drpeter

Super Member
Consider the Oxford Learners' Dictionary definition. It does not state directionality for stripes. I checked a couple of other online dictionaries with the same result (did not want to drag down my paper copy of the OED!)

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/stripe

In the definition, they talk about sergeant's stripes, which are technically chevrons, but commonly called stripes.

If you wish to call them bands, that is fine by me. But we can agree to disagree, and I'll go with the OED and convention and call them all stripes, no matter which direction they are going.
 

Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
Well, I refuse to go with these rules about bands They may be significant for heraldry, but I don't think they are, not for striped ties. Along with all the other non-anal fellows, I'll just call them regimental stripes. I've had associaitons with at least one regiment, the Gurkhas, and they call it regimental stripes too, not bands.

These are all conventions, after all. Why be so rigid about them?
Get out the reading specs. You keep referencing bands, it's bends. And of course you're allowed to break time-honored traditions in classic men's dress terminology. Go for it.
 
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TKI67

Elite Member
Consider the Oxford Learners' Dictionary definition. It does not state directionality for stripes. I checked a couple of other online dictionaries with the same result (did not want to drag down my paper copy of the OED!)

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/stripe

In the definition, they talk about sergeant's stripes, which are technically chevrons, but commonly called stripes.

If you wish to call them bands, that is fine by me. But we can agree to disagree, and I'll go with the OED and convention and call them all stripes, no matter which direction they are going.
Chevrons on the shoulder to show rank and bends, informally called hashmarks, on the sleeve to show service. Then we who were in the Navy wore bars on our collars and shoulder boards and stripes, all be they horizontal, on our cuffs. No one had a wetting down party for sewing on another band. Oh yeah, bends are knots.
 

triklops55

Super Member
Living in San Jose, I'm a relatively short distance away from Monterey, where Robert Talbott ties have been made. I have a nice stock of them that I've been able to acquire from thrift stores.

I even have a few yards of deadstock silk striped tie fabric from Talbott that I bought from an amateur seamstress last summer. If anyone is interested in buying the fabric, or knows of someone who can turn the fabric into bowties for me, let me know.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Get out the reading specs. You keep referencing bands, it's bends. And of course you're allowed to break time-honored traditions in classic men's dress terminology. Go for it.
Bends, I stand corrected. I got confused by TKI's original quote from you, Peaks, which said bands for left to right and bends for diagonals. However, I still don't agree with their usage for ties, so I'll continue calling them regimental stripes.

And thank you, I'll take my chances with the Men's Dress Terminology Police, even Brooks Brothers have called them regimental stripes. LOL, Live dangerously and die defending your stripes! I simply can't see myself calling the blasted things regimental bends ties. Just doesn't roll off the tongue smartly, if you get my drift.

But thanks for educating me about all of this, Peaks and TKI. It's one more item of recondite sartorial lore to file away in the old noggin.
 
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