eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
That appears to be a K3. There is something special about a single shot rifle.
"One shot, one kill!" Most of my hunting of larger game over the past 60 years has been with bolt action and/or lever action rifles. Additional rounds were available to me, but I'm pleased to say in all that time, not a single critter has required more than a single round to take down! Hunting here in the US with a single shot piece is quite possible, but I for one would welcome the comfort provided by additional rounds in the rifle hunting in more exotic areas of this beautiful world of ours. Just sayin.....;)
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
That appears to be a K3. There is something special about a single shot rifle.
"One shot, one kill!" Most of my hunting of larger game over the past 60 years has been with bolt action and/or lever action rifles. Additional rounds were available to me, but I'm pleased to say in all that time, not a single critter has required more than a single round to take down! Hunting here in the US with a single shot piece is quite possible, but I for one would welcome the comfort provided by additional rounds in the rifle hunting in more exotic areas of this beautiful world of ours. Just sayin.....;)
It is and chambered in .243. I should have preferred 7x57 or 8x57 but that would have cost me at least another $1,000 so,

I have learned (rather the hard way) that a bolt gun (preferably a Mauser 98) is the affordable choice for the adage, "When in elephant country, carry an elephant rifle.." The same applies to grizzly country or tiger country. Should I ever return to Africa on a gun safari, I shall not make the error of leaving my .450 in the safe. There is a limit to how much excitement I can tolerate . . .
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
It is and chambered in .243. I should have preferred 7x57 or 8x57 but that would have cost me at least another $1,000 so,

I have learned (rather the hard way) that a bolt gun (preferably a Mauser 98) is the affordable choice for the adage, "When in elephant country, carry an elephant rifle.." The same applies to grizzly country or tiger country. Should I ever return to Africa on a gun safari, I shall not make the error of leaving my .450 in the safe. There is a limit to how much excitement I can tolerate . . .
Sage counsel, for sure, my friend. I must admit when hunting for wild hogs locally and having been told they are aggressive and will perhaps attack the hunter, it was comforting knowing I had back up shots available, if the first didn't take him down. ;)
 

challer

Senior Member
The wild pigs have found VA and when hunting them or in their range, a bolt action and a backup 10mm is normal, same with brownies. Otherwise, I've never taken a second shot from a bolt action . Stalking is where the single shot shines.
 

Big T

Senior Member
Lovely conversation, in this thread, and one that would be most fun at our hunting camp, either sitting on the porch, or in front of the fireplace!

I have three single shots: one Ruger #1 and two of the new Henry’s. I hunted with the Ruger, but never took any game. The Henry’s are really fun to shoot, but not in the field (yet). Henry makes shotguns on the same frame, and a single 16 will be making it my way in the near future.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Lovely conversation, in this thread, and one that would be most fun at our hunting camp, either sitting on the porch, or in front of the fireplace!

I have three single shots: one Ruger #1 and two of the new Henry’s. I hunted with the Ruger, but never took any game. The Henry’s are really fun to shoot, but not in the field (yet). Henry makes shotguns on the same frame, and a single 16 will be making it my way in the near future.
A single barrel 16 Gauge Stevens's Shotgun was my first Thunder stick when I was first introduced to hunting at the ripe old age of 12 years!
I decimated the central Pennsylvania squirrel and cottontail populations with that sweet thunder stick.. The Stevens was followed a year later when a Westernfield bolt action in .243 caliber was added to my collection....and the White Tail population became concerned, but not too concerned. LOL. ;)
 

Big T

Senior Member
A single barrel 16 Gauge Stevens's Shotgun was my first Thunder stick when I was first introduced to hunting at the ripe old age of 12 years!
I decimated the central Pennsylvania squirrel and cottontail populations with that sweet thunder stick.. The Stevens was followed a year later when a Westernfield bolt action in .243 caliber was added to my collection....and the White Tail population became concerned, but not too concerned. LOL. ;)
Same here! You ought to take a look at the Henry single shot, for nostalgia purposes!
 
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