Woofa

Super Member
So I have been feeling like the site has become a little monotonous lately.

Here is a new topic for discussion That I hope will recharge our batteries.

I get to shop quite a bit at No Man Walks Alone with funds from my thrift finds. With most of my sartorial needs well satisfied and living in a warm climate I have been thinking about purchasing a Safari jacket.

I can remember seeing a nice navy blue on one of our threads some months back. Let me clarify that these modern incarnations have little to do with the originals which I assume were made for British soldiers in Africa and the like.
These newer ones are done in different colors and sometimes fabric blends And are certainly not cheap. At the moment I am eyeing a cotton one in dark brown cotton and no belt. Although I might like to wait for a linen in dark blue.
Meant more like an option to replace a sport coat than a jacket.
So, have you owned one? Thoughts? I know many here will want to go old school in beige with the classic options but I want your thoughts on something a little more modern.
Here is one posted by someone on tof That I like. (I hope he won’t mind me using the photo and I think he dresses with a lot of style.)
1597975292117.jpeg

thanks,
 

SoCal2warm

New Member
Linen is more breathable and a stronger fiber than cotton (especially if it gets wet) but cotton is the softer material of the two, and linen can often develop a more wrinkly appearance. To me, linen almost has an appearance like a canvas material, which can be either good or bad. It certainly has its own look, kind of like more informal but stylish. Although it really depends on the weave. It can really show some rustic texture. Linen can also be a bit more stiff.


You might have a look at the James Bond Safari jacket:
https://www.iconicalternatives.com/2019/05/27/james-bond-safari-jacket/
 

delicious_scent

Super Member
I own 3.

A light sage green cotton, a mid-blue linen, and an off-white safari jacket.

The mid-blue linen was my worst purchase, and I went bespoke for it. It looks striking, drapes nicely with thick linen, but looks too costumey and basically goes with not much.

My favourite is probably the light sage green from Tag Safari.



I've worn it in spring and fall, worn it over a hoodie while camping, and worn it in winter as seen above (as a mid layer).

The off-white one is not belted and is a bit longer with more of a slim fit. Still a great purchase though, from Abercrombie & Fitch. Basically a field jacket in cotton-linen.

The blue one basically copied the fit of the slouchy Tag jacket.

 

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Advanced Member
I own several. I can’t recommend them highly enough.

TAG is an excellent value. I wore one in Africa and it held up well.

I have a vintage Willis & Geiger Hemingway jacket that I love.

There are always a lot of great examples from well regarded outfitters available on eBay that one can pick up for a bargain price. I think many of the ones from the 70s are very cool. Satisfies ones Jim Fowler/Marlin Perkins itch.

I think value for money, TAG is hard to top. They are made in Zimbabwe, so they know what they are doing.

Cheers,

BSR
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
Third vote for TAG, "Made in Africa by Africans". The price is correct, the quality better than you might expect. I also own a vintage Willis & Geiger. It's a bit heavy but actually a better choice in this foggy, grey clime. My third is an Abercrombie and Fitch from that short period when they thought about getting away from kiddy-wear and trying to reconnect with the name's legendary roots. It's probably the one I wear most, being the lightest weight. However, I don't wear any of them much. I don't know why. I guess it's because when I want an overshirt sort of thing, I reach for a Pendleton board shirt. And if it's too warm for a Pendleton, it's too warm for an overshirt. Such are the first world problems of living in the PNW.
 

richard warren

Senior Member
I have 5. I find they are for the most part an unsatisfactory compromise between a shirt and a jacket. Some lean more towards a shirt (no inside pockets, shirt like collar) and some lean towards a jacket (lapels, inside pockets). I find a sports jacket (unlined, lightweight material for hot weather) is a better option than a safari jacket when I want to wear something with inside pockets. The ones that lean towards a shirt are too heavy and have belts which make them less than optimum shirts.

I once had one from Banana Republic ( a long time ago) that was a near perfect blend of shirt and light jacket, with no belt. (Those belts are a pain, as far as I am concerned.). It was really more of a tunic, I guess. Long gone. The closest I have to it now is this from Midway:

https://ads.midwayusa.com/product/9...ac15ff12f8a7aa7848c26b&utm_term=1101131606176

I have it in dark green which was too green so I bleached it to a grey color. This one pretty much is my idea of a traditional safari jacket, but it is too heavy for warm weather use where I live:

https://onlinemilitaria.net/products/1243-UK-Belted-Bush-Jackets-Khaki/?bc=no
 

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Advanced Member
I agree about the belt. They are not very functional, and unless sewn in, are easily lost. I prefer a belted back with no belt.

Tag has an excellent elastic band sewn into the waist that allows for the visual gather that forms a waistline without the need for the belt.

I have found the best climate for a Safari jacket is one where it is hot in the day and cool at night, like the desert, or the veld in South Africa. You can roll up the sleeves during the day and hook them with the sewn in loops, and bundle up a bit at night. Plus the cotton wicks moisture, keeping you cool during the day and dries out quickly so you don’t get hypothermic at night.

The Afrika Corp and the Desert Rats proved the functionality and durability of the material and design in conditions which can only be called “extreme”. I spent a summer in Tunisia in 1993 and can attest to the challenging weather.

Cheers,

BSR
 

Dhaller

Advanced Member
I have it in dark green which was too green so I bleached it to a grey color. This one pretty much is my idea of a traditional safari jacket, but it is too heavy for warm weather use where I live:

https://onlinemilitaria.net/products/1243-UK-Belted-Bush-Jackets-Khaki/?bc=no
This is what keeps me from buying a nice safari jacket (I like the *concept* of the thing): "I don't know where all folks are going on safari, but it for dang sure ain't Georgia during the summer!" (or Louisiana, for that matter.)

I'd get one for travel, but for the same purpose I go to Orvis's "Zambezi" twill travel-jacket thingie (which is sometimes available, sometimes not).

Totally agree about the belt. I hate them on trench coats, too. Perhaps I've never lived anyplace windy enough to fully appreciate their utility.

I remember awhile back, someone posted a gorgeous bespoke (navy? I think?) linen safari jacket... obviously, that must have been posted either by Flanderian or Oldsarge (the twin arbiters of the seasoned gentlemen's style)... maybe - MAYBE - someday I'll do one up.

(Ideally when my daughter is a teenager, and I can be the Dad that shows up in jodhpurs and a safari jacket to pick her up. Can't wait!)

DH
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
I agree about the belt. They are not very functional, and unless sewn in, are easily lost. I prefer a belted back with no belt.

Tag has an excellent elastic band sewn into the waist that allows for the visual gather that forms a waistline without the need for the belt.

I have found the best climate for a Safari jacket is one where it is hot in the day and cool at night, like the desert, or the veld in South Africa. You can roll up the sleeves during the day and hook them with the sewn in loops, and bundle up a bit at night. Plus the cotton wicks moisture, keeping you cool during the day and dries out quickly so you don’t get hypothermic at night.

The Afrika Corp and the Desert Rats proved the functionality and durability of the material and design in conditions which can only be called “extreme”. I spent a summer in Tunisia in 1993 and can attest to the challenging weather.

Cheers,

BSR
This! Neither the belt nor the silly shell loops where a breast pocket should go have any function. The breast pocket is where your sun/shooting glasses go and ammunition belongs in a pouch on your belt . . . unless you are one of those with the financial mass to swing a double rifle. Then the third and fourth round go under a wide elastic band on your off wrist. And if you need more than four rounds, you should have been spending more time on the range! ;)
 

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Advanced Member
This is what keeps me from buying a nice safari jacket (I like the *concept* of the thing): "I don't know where all folks are going on safari, but it for dang sure ain't Georgia during the summer!" (or Louisiana, for that matter.)

I'd get one for travel, but for the same purpose I go to Orvis's "Zambezi" twill travel-jacket thingie (which is sometimes available, sometimes not).

Totally agree about the belt. I hate them on trench coats, too. Perhaps I've never lived anyplace windy enough to fully appreciate their utility.

I remember awhile back, someone posted a gorgeous bespoke (navy? I think?) linen safari jacket... obviously, that must have been posted either by Flanderian or Oldsarge (the twin arbiters of the seasoned gentlemen's style)... maybe - MAYBE - someday I'll do one up.

(Ideally when my daughter is a teenager, and I can be the Dad that shows up in jodhpurs and a safari jacket to pick her up. Can't wait!)

DH
I have a 44R Zambezi that is like new for $99 if you want one :)

I hit my goal weight today and the damn thing is far too large now.

Cheers,

BSR
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I have a 44R Zambezi that is like new for $99 if you want one :)

I hit my goal weight today and the damn thing is far too large now.

Cheers,

BSR
I am very impressed with your weight loss success my friend. As the result of a new year's resolution, I have managed to drop a pound or two a month since January of this year, but at the rate I am losing, this could be a long, long journey. LOL. Congratulations on your success Mr. B. Scott Robinson. ;)
 
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