delicious_scent

Super Member

I keep going back to this article lately, and I'm getting back into my vaguely americana/trad/ivy wardrobe again.

One of the first things I bought when I was 18 or 19 was an M65 field jacket from GAP, and a pair of boots from red wings.

There have been strong correlations with existential crises(recession a decade ago, pandemic now) and the resurgence of Americana, that may be why I'm coming back full circle.

I bought a LL Bean chamois shirt from etsy in a reddish pink shade and it feels great. It basically feels like a moleskin shirt to me. It's incredibly soft, broken in, and not stiff despite being thick. I've always wanted to like flannel/plaid shirts, but they don't suit my style at all. This shirt feels like a win-win in that regard.

It pairs naturally with a tucked OCBD, by itself, or over a t-shirt. There was an ick factor for me initially for not buying used clothing that sits close to the skin, but this one looks cleaner than my own shirts.

Also have a vintage Levi's denim jacket coming in, but this one was not cheap. It should slot in nicely as an alternative to my field jacket.

Jerrod has a comfy looking picture that show how nicely overshirts pair with OCBDs.

 

Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
While I only rarely find anything I like thrifting nowadays, I originally got into it because I wanted to get great old pieces for rock bottom prices. I didn't look for vintage per se but wanted traditional pieces. Certainly a lot of pieces were vintage, however.
 

delicious_scent

Super Member
While I only rarely find anything I like thrifting nowadays, I originally got into it because I wanted to get great old pieces for rock bottom prices. I didn't look for vintage per se but wanted traditional pieces. Certainly a lot of pieces were vintage, however.
I think that was part of what I didn't like about thrifting initially. It felt like I had to parse for a long time in person or on ebay, and there was no guarantee on finding anything useful.

The article up there changed my perspective in that certain used/vintage pieces look better than their new or modern counterparts, and may not necessarily be about price.

I also didn't know there are curators you can contact to help you find a particular item that you had in mind.
 

Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Of the 9 sport coats and 2 suits I owned at the time of my retirement, all but 1 sport coat had been thrifted. Both of my favorite topcoats were thrfited. All but 1 of the topcoats I wouldn't consider to be vintage. Also picked up a tweed flatcap and a 1940's fedora thrifting. On second thought, another sport coat in that batch, a Hart Schaffner, and Marx camel hair is probably old enough to be considered vintage too.
 
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drpeter

Super Member
I think that was part of what I didn't like about thrifting initially. It felt like I had to parse for a long time in person or on ebay, and there was no guarantee on finding anything useful.

The article up there changed my perspective in that certain used/vintage pieces look better than their new or modern counterparts, and may not necessarily be about price.

I also didn't know there are curators you can contact to help you find a particular item that you had in mind.
Haven't read the article yet, but I think thrift shops have definite advantages over eBay, etsy and other online sources of vintage or second-hand clothing (or even new-with-tags items).

First, you actually get to examine the item carefully before buying, and you can try it on. Second, you save a fair bit on shipping and handling, and also on the trouble and costs of returning items, if that is something the online seller will permit. Third, the prices are usually far better than on the online auction sites (you don't have to deal with the vagaries of bidding, or even shill bidding).

Regular prices at Goodwill are $10-$15 for sports jackets and often one finds items placed on clearance for $0.99 to $1.99 flat. I have picked up gorgeous sports jackets with tags on from the clearance aisles, and I have also found splendid casual jackets and overcoats, both leather and cloth, with wonderful patina. Two dollars can get you these things. For $10-$15, one can find quality shoes, like Allen Edmonds models, in good condition and lightly worn. My best buy in this area last summer was a pair of lightly worn shell cordovan burgundy AE MacNeils, with lovely patina, for $15.

The downside is that one must go to these shops frequently, and one must do so on a regular basis in order to find good things. This may involve some driving, and that has its costs, but one can easily pair a visit to thrift shops in a town with a trip there for other reasons, like visiting friends, or doing other sorts of shopping. And with the pandemic, it may not be very safe for some of us to go to some shops, but one hopes that issue will disappear in the not-too-distant future!
 
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delicious_scent

Super Member
Haven't read the article yet, but I think thrift shops have definite advantages over eBay, etsy and other online sources of vintage or second-hand clothing (or even new-with-tags items).

First, you actually get to examine the item carefully before buying, and you can try it on. Second, you save a fair bit on shipping and handling, and also on the trouble and costs of returning items, if that is something the online seller will permit. Third, the prices are usually far better than on the online auction sites (you don't have to deal with the vagaries of bidding, or even shill bidding).

Regular prices at Goodwill are $10-$15 for sports jackets and often one finds items placed on clearance for $0.99 to $1.99 flat. I have picked up gorgeous sports jackets with tags on from the clearance aisles, and I have also found splendid casual jackets and overcoats, both leather and cloth, with wonderful patina. Two dollars can get you these things. For $10-$15, one can find quality shoes, like Allen Edmonds models, in good condition and lightly worn. My best buy in this area last summer was a pair of lightly worn shell cordovan burgundy AE MacNeils, with lovely patina, for $15.

The downside is that one must go to these shops frequently, and one must do so on a regular basis in order to find good things. This may involve some driving, and that has its costs, but one can easily pair a visit to thrift shops in a town with a trip there for other reasons, like visiting friends, or doing other sorts of shopping. And with the pandemic, it may not be very safe for some of us to go to some shops, but one hopes that issue will disappear in the not-too-distant future!
The bolded reminds me of the one time I enjoyed physical thrifting, was with a friend.

Over here, we're not allowed to visit each other's households, but there are no rules against masked shopping.

That same friend is very old school and barely uses social media, let alone texting. He is very hard to get hold of.

Sounds like a perfect opportunity for us to go thrifting again in the summer! Thanks for the idea.
 

Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
... I think thrift shops have definite advantages over eBay, etsy and other online sources of vintage or second-hand clothing (or even new-with-tags items.
They go hand in hand. Shopping a thrift is by-chance shopping. The green Brooks Brothers shirt for which you thirst is not going to be there. But with patience you find similar on-line and this is because there are thousands of thrifts in the US, but only a couple near you and a guy picking a Goodwill in Oklahoma and tossing it on Ebay becomes your personal shopper and for that you pay him a comission and shipping fee.

Then there's this. One can lead to another. Neatly folded in another room are two as-new Beretta sweaters which cost $14.50 each. One came from a thrift shop for $7 and became an overnight favorite. Wanting a second in a different color (and willing to wait three months), one turned up on Poshmark for $22, with shipping. I had never heard of Beretta. The by-chance find at a local thrift clued me in. The on-line purchase doubled my fun. They average $14.50 each.
 
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drpeter

Super Member
Good to see you back, Peaks! Unless you were posting on another forum in AAAC.

Your comments are well-taken. One way I maximize my chances is by going to six or seven Goodwills and other thrifts and consignment shops in my general area, several times a week. This takes time (I'm retired and I have time), gasoline, and so forth. Personally, I have done well, so no complaints. I also don't do eBay, etsy, etc. ever since my eBay and Amazon accounts got hacked about a year ago. I've learned to live without them.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Think I've seen you. '92 Cutlass with a Dwight Yoakam sticker, right? Sprung trunk, old clothes and crap hanging out the rear?
Friend Peaks
Ah, not quite. It's usually a snow- and salt-covered, but super-charged 2013 VW GTI ( I do give it a bath now and then ), but I drive it as though it were a Porsche 911 GT. The trunk lid is always firmly in place, but the trunk itself is packed with first editions "stolen" at bargain prices from various places, nicely wrapped in plastic and kept in cardboard boxes. That way, if the apocalypse hits and I have to bug out into the hinterland at a moment's notice, I will at least have reading matter to while away the time before radiation death strikes me, LOL.

The clothes I snag at Goodwill are actually in the back seat. Easier to get them in and out. BTW, who the devil is Dwight Yoakam? Was he the Lieutenant Yoakam of Skinner's Horse in Calcutta, back when? (That's Leftenant, of course).
 
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drpeter

Super Member
A really gorgeous vintage find today at an area Goodwill: A beautiful custom/MTM Harris tweed jacket, made in England with the tailor's name (Alexandre) and the old-fashioned Harris Tweed label of authenticity. The colour is a lovely dark green with brown and turquoise elements in it, somewhat unusual for a Harris tweed, at least in my experience.

The styling is rather like Ivy, but with some differences. It has slim lapels with the lower point of the notch rounded. No darts, three buttons in front and one button on each cuff. The buttons are black leather, but worn in parts, nice patina. It also has two angled flap pockets (plus the usual breast pocket) and side vents, both traditionally English features. The cloth is of medium thickness and it has a nice fresh hand -- springy to the touch in the new wool sense, although this could not have been made anytime later than the sixties. The jacket is fully lined in dark green satin. And it is a good fit.

The cost is the stunning part: $5.99 plus tax. Very happy with this purchase.
 

Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
A really gorgeous vintage find today at an area Goodwill: A beautiful custom/MTM Harris tweed jacket, made in England with the tailor's name (Alexandre) and the old-fashioned Harris Tweed label of authenticity. The colour is a lovely dark green with brown and turquoise elements in it, somewhat unusual for a Harris tweed, at least in my experience.

The styling is rather like Ivy, but with some differences. It has slim lapels with the lower point of the notch rounded. No darts, three buttons in front and one button on each cuff. The buttons are black leather, but worn in parts, nice patina. It also has two angled flap pockets (plus the usual breast pocket) and side vents, both traditionally English features. The cloth is of medium thickness and it has a nice fresh hand -- springy to the touch in the new wool sense, although this could not have been made anytime later than the sixties. The jacket is fully lined in dark green satin. And it is a good fit.

The cost is the stunning part: $5.99 plus tax. Very happy with this purchase.
My only Harris tweed also has that old fashioned label of authenticity. Am guessing that, with mine also having slim lapels, it's from the 60's as well but is and was in marvelous shape. You do come up with a lot of Harris tweed jackets. I can see why they're tempting, but, honestly, if I remember from 1 of your more recent posts, this puts you up over a dozen Harris tweeds. I'd imagine that, unless you wear 1 nearly every day, it would be difficult to give any one of them a lot of wear.
 

drpeter

Super Member
My only Harris tweed also has that old fashioned label of authenticity. Am guessing that, with mine also having slim lapels, it's from the 60's as well but is and was in marvelous shape. You do come up with a lot of Harris tweed jackets. I can see why they're tempting, but, honestly, if I remember from 1 of your more recent posts, this puts you up over a dozen Harris tweeds. I'd imagine that, unless you wear 1 nearly every day, it would be difficult to give any one of them a lot of wear.
It's one of the mysteries of my character. Being a collector by nature, I tend to collect with abandon. I have close to a thousand ties, both four-in-hands and bow ties. At one point I had almost 25 suits and fifty or sixty sports jackets (not including the dozen or so Harrises). I donated a whole lot to charity, but at Goodwill prices, it is easy to slip back into buying. The point is not whether I will end up wearing any of my clothes a lot -- but when I feel like it, I have access to a truly splendid variety of items to suit any mood.

It isn't just clothes. I have a fine library and a substantial number of first editions, some of them quite valuable. I read them, some of them I re-read several times. I have an excellent British Empire stamp collection with some rarities and some complete omnibus sets and some complete colonies. I have similar collections for seven other European colonial powers. Also a highly specialized collection of Allied Military Government issues and overprints for the post-WWII period. And early French railway mail covers. After retirement I sold most of my investments in the market in order to build my collections of fine books and finer stamps. I can enjoy them, while I can't enjoy stocks.

I have similarly extensive collections of other things -- IBM Thinkpads from most of its models, vintage bicycles ( an expensive hobby, but I bought frames and components and often built my own bikes, period accurate with the correct gruppos or componentry). I had fifteen bikes at one point (and I was living in a flat, LOL). Now I have culled the stable down to seven.

I have a PowerPoint lecture I gave at the university on collecting and collectors. Collecting is about imposing structure and order on a small part of the world. In a sense, my scientific work is similar, it too is about finding order -- laws, explanations, theories, models -- in some aspect of nature, in my case the mind/brain (which is actually a huge area). And writing fiction is imposing the elements of story, again order and structure on life, which is random and meaningless -- we have to give our lives meaning, it doesn't exist on its own out there! When I create fiction, the characters and plots mostly come out of my own mind, so they are facets of my cognition.

So all the things I do, including collecting Harris tweed jackets, is part of the way in which I am in the world. It's my story. I think we all have such ways of being. The best part: There aren't dull moments in my life. The last time I was bored was during the Eisenhower administration.
 
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Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
It's one of the mysteries of my character. Being a collector by nature, I tend to collect with abandon. I have close to a thousand ties, both four-in-hands and bow ties. At one point I had almost 25 suits and fifty or sixty sports jackets (not including the dozen or so Harrises). I donated a whole lot to charity, but at Goodwill prices, it is easy to slip back into buying. The point is not whether I will end up wearing any of my clothes a lot -- but when I feel like it, I have access to a truly splendid variety of items to suit any mood.

It isn't just clothes. I have a fine library and a substantial number of first editions, some of them quite valuable. I read them, some of them I re-read several times. I have an excellent British Empire stamp collection with some rarities and some complete omnibus sets and some complete colonies. I have similar collections for seven other European colonial powers. Also a highly specialized collection of Allied Military Government issues and overprints for the post-WWII period. And early French railway mail covers. After retirement I sold most of my investments in the market in order to build my collections of fine books and finer stamps. I can enjoy them, while I can't enjoy stocks.

I have similarly extensive collections of other things -- IBM Thinkpads from most of its models, vintage bicycles ( an expensive hobby, but I bought frames and components and often built my own bikes, period accurate with the correct gruppos or componentry). I had fifteen bikes at one point (and I was living in a flat, LOL). Now I have culled the stable down to seven.

I have a PowerPoint lecture I gave at the university on collecting and collectors. Collecting is about imposing structure and order on a small part of the world. In a sense, my scientific work is similar, it too is about finding order -- laws, explanations, theories, models -- in some aspect of nature, in my case the mind/brain (which is actually a huge area). And writing fiction is imposing the elements of story, again order and structure on life, which is random and meaningless -- we have to give our lives meaning, it doesn't exist on its own out there! When I create fiction, the characters and plots mostly come out of my own mind, so they are facets of my cognition.

So all the things I do, including collecting Harris tweed jackets, is part of the way in which I am in the world. It's my story. I think we all have such ways of being. The best part: There aren't dull moments in my life. The last time I was bored was during the Eisenhower administration.
I've collected various things at various times in my life with my primary collection being tobacco pipes-to smoke. Recently acquired 2 of my most sought after pipes. But, with their acquisition I realized I'd topped out in that I now have a hard time working all my pipes into a regular rotation and, therefore, don't figuratively and literally have room for any more and don't plan to buy any more. Just like pipes, to me clothes are not just to look at but to use.
 

ran23

Super Member
My Nordstrom Navy gingham needed repairs that didn't last a few washings. Just got a Nordstrom Rack Black/white gingham (always wanted one) for $8.99 w/tags. bay trim but fits
 

ran23

Super Member
If that didn't make sense, then 'ebay, Trim but fits'. My new medication has kicked my gut out to 37", but denim at 34" is fine. flannels? too bad.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I figured you meant eBay.

Isn't the denim the harder cloth to stretch, though? I would imagine wearing a tighter denim would be tougher than the more forgiving wool flannel.
 
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