Tweedlover

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
My best thrifting deal occurring at a Goodwill was some years back and involved pants. I found some fancy-schmancy navy blue, cuffed dress pants by some Italian label whose name escapes me at the moment. But, at the time I bought it was curious and googled it to find it was still being offered for retail at a price of $300. Paid $4 for it. Don't know, though, what about it justified a $300 price.
 

ran23

Super Member
Since I started on this thread: So my denim fit at 34" (5-7+, 170 lbs, 67 soon). I didn't have a fat gut late December, wore flannels and tie to an appointment. Late February I discovered this problem with 34" Navy plaid flannels. I stopped my new thyroid meds all of February, didn't help the gut. My Brooks 40-S suit came in, same problem. Waiting till Monday to talk to my Doctor. At my age, same diet , same weight and exercise, this is a possibility? wife thinks so.
 

Dandan

New Member
This story doesn’t involve a thrift store, but a classified-ads website that’s popular in Germany.

A few days ago I came across a pair of Vass Budapesters in very good condition and with shoe trees for €38. I thought, “OMG OMG OMG, a once-in-a-lifetime find!”

They came. They fit. I was pleased.

They were quite stiff and a little white. I didn’t think about it, and I conditioned them and polished them a bit. They were a little discoloured the way cordovan discolours. I still didn’t think about it. Then I tried them on again and noticed that they didn’t have any creases, and that that’s because OMG OMG OMG they’re cordovan!

Two things went through my mind at the same time.

1. They can’t be cordovan. But they are. But they can’t be. But they are.
2. I want to tell Ask Andy!

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drpeter

Super Member
I think they are shell cordovan. The white stuff you saw is very often seen with shell -- it is a kind of fatty deposit the emerges from the shell, if I recall correctly.

Sometimes you luck out on prices. I've mentioned here that I found a pair of A&E MacNeil shell cordovan wingtips for $15 at Goodwill last summer. These things happen now and then. Count yourself very fortunate.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Two interesting finds, the first from Goodwill and the second from a local thrift shop:

A very nice pair of English-made Charles Tyrwhitt burgundy tassel loafers with brogued toe and short wings. The model is Whitcomb. It looks and feels like fine calfskin. Moderate wear, Goodyear-welted, and leather heel stack with a rubber outer layer. Fits me well. Cost: $13 plus tax. Here is an exact image from the web:

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A second item, which I've never seen before: a GH Bass sponge cleaner for suede and nubuck shoes. It is in a tin and the brush is built into the lid. It is unused, but somewhat old, judging by the lettering on the cover. I'll add it to my shoeshine kit. Cost: $2.00 plus tax.

Along with other such products acquired recently, I think I now have more suede/nubuck shoe care products than I have suede/nubuck shoes. I'm trying to remedy that and looking out for these kinds of shoes, LOL. This is an exact image from the web:

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drpeter

Super Member
It was a standard polyester blend, no different in feel and appearance to other dress pants I've had which I probably bought new for $30. But, we know a lot of people pay premium simply due to the label.
I don't know which Italian label it was, but charging $300 for a pair of trousers made of a polyester-wool blend seems extortionate to me. Unless the fabric was designed to withstand environmental conditions on Mars.

LOL, an old schoolmate of mine who works as a navigation engineer on the Mars Rover project for JPL in Pasadena assures me that we could well see human landings on Mars by 2035. So the Brionis or the Loro Pianas of Planet Earth might be gearing up with space-age fibres and fabrics to land those NASA contracts!
 
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drpeter

Super Member
Yesterday's find at a small community thrift shop here in town: A very nice, lightly-worn pair of Doc Martens bluchers, dark brown oiled leather, four eyelets, the usual thick welted PVC soles but with black thread, rather than the signature yellow thread. These say Made in England and Fabriqué en Angleterre on the insole along with the standard curvy Dr Martens logo with Air-Wair, and have the model name as "The Original". They are, like all the boots, solidly made and on the heavy side. They are slightly broken in and a very comfortable fit for me. Spring is a good time to wear them for a bit and test them out.

This shop had low prices, and this pair, believe it or not, was only $4 plus tax. I said that was far too low, and offered more, but they said they will stick to the price as marked because that was their policy! Small towns in this country still have folks like that. But they said I could make an extra contribution in the Donations Jar, which I did.

A really remarkable find. I plan to spend some time this morning, cleaning and conditioning this pair, although it seems to have been well looked after.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Some nice Goodwill finds:

A lovely NOS US-made Brooks Brothers jacket, made of cloth with a small houndstooth pattern, beige, black and cream, 53% silk and 47% worsted wool, medium lapels, flapped pockets, single vent, darted front -- a classic cut. Very wrinkled but ten minutes with my trusty steamer made it look very spry. Perfect for daytime casual wear in the spring. Cost $20.

A Stafford ultrasuede jacket, classic styling, a nice beige with a soft hand. I described it elsewhere on this forum, but it looks and feels elegant and comfortable. Opinions differ on the material, which is artificial fibre, I thought I would give it a try especially with the thrift shop price. Cost $20.

A pair of Eastland, Made in Freeport, Maine shoes -- moccasin style oiled leather, two eyelets and rawhide laces. Very soft and comfortable, this is close to a boat shoe in feel and even appearance. I picked up a similar pair of Eastlands a week or so ago from a different shop. Cost $10.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I have three pair of SAS shoes in my rotation, their 40th Anniversary Penny Loafers and their version of a deck /boat shoe. The Penny Loafers have seen a lot of wear and have proven to be very durable, extremely comfortable and worth far more than I paid for them. The Deck/boat shoes are well made and are as comfortable, but I do prefer my Quoddy Trail Boat Shoes and Camp Mocs over the SAS version. ;)
I just read this again, Eagle, and wanted to say: I'd love to find a pair of Quoddy boat shoes at a thrift shop! The new prices are far too high for me, LOL, but one of these days, I just might buy a pair. From what I have heard, the handcrafted quality is phenomenal and they are still made in Maine, I think.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Yes, by White Man too lazy to say Passamaquoddy, an Indian tribe here, as well as the magnificent Passamaquoddy Bay, home to Roosevelt's Campobello.
Thank you, Peakster. You do speak with un-forked tongue.

I knew there was a Native American connection somewhere in that name, although it sounds English, the same way the word Shakespeare's nonny does. But quoddy doesn't exactly sound like an Elizabethan expression -- I'll bet the word quoddy does not appear in any of the plays and poems by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Ben Jonson, et al. Although there's quatch, which means pudgy...

(By the way Indian is really my tribe, as in India. It's the wrong name for the first nations of this continent. But nobody listens to me...)

How can one not love words and language? It's what makes us human, I think.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I just read this again, Eagle, and wanted to say: I'd love to find a pair of Quoddy boat shoes at a thrift shop! The new prices are far too high for me, LOL, but one of these days, I just might buy a pair. From what I have heard, the handcrafted quality is phenomenal and they are still made in Maine, I think.
As far as I know, Quoddy Trails are still made in Maine. I agree that they are a bit pricey...even way back when I bought my first pair, as I recall they were running $165 a shot., but back then we could have them resoled for $30 and these days resoling runs $125 (the last I heard). In my experience a pair can be twice resoled before giving up the ghost! However, in retrospect I could have squeezed a third resoling out of that pair before conceding them to the footwear afterlife! LOL. ;) Good luck in your hunt.
 

drpeter

Super Member
Two finds thrifting yesterday:

An Italian-made, Zegna Trofeo sports jacket, a lovely 100% wool district check with blue, black and cream, classic styling and very soft hand. The Trofeo is Australian merino, according to something I read in this forum. It has a two-button front and side vents. New with tags. Cost $10.00.

A Jack Victor sports jacket, Canadian-made, 100% wool, with large dark blue and grey checks, very quiet and elegant, beautifully pattern-matched in all the critical areas -- this is often not the case with the large plaid patterns in jackets. Classic styling, with a two-button front and double vents. I read in this forum that Jack Victor supplies suits and sportcoats to Brooks Brothers, or did at some point in time. New with tags. Cost $10.00.

Both jackets are half-canvassed and are a good fit for me, except at the waist, where they are slightly snug when the top button is fastened. This is because they are a size 38R and I usually wear a size 40R. My fine tailor, Mr Vang can handle this easily by letting out the sides an inch or so. Or else I could go on bread and water for a couple of weeks -- give up those thick grilled steaks bathed in butter. But that's a bit much, though, just to fit into some damn jacket, right?

Based on my research, retail prices for a Zegna sports jacket tends to be around $1500, and Jack Victor sportcoats run around $500 in the shops. Not a bad day for me, I'll say.
 
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eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Two finds thrifting yesterday:

An Italian-made, Zegna Trofeo sports jacket, a lovely 100% wool district check with blue, black and cream, classic styling and very soft hand. The Trofeo is Australian merino, according to something I read in this forum. It has a two-button front and side vents. New with tags. Cost $10.00.

A Jack Victor sports jacket, Canadian-made, 100% wool, with large dark blue and grey checks, very quiet and elegant, beautifully pattern-matched in all the critical areas -- this is often not the case with the large plaid patterns in jackets. Classic styling, with a two-button front and double vents. I read in this forum that Jack Victor supplies suits and sportcoats to Brooks Brothers, or did at some point in time. New with tags. Cost $10.00.

Both jackets are half-canvassed and are a good fit for me, except at the waist, where they are slightly snug when the top button is fastened. This is because they are a size 38R and I usually wear a size 40R. My fine tailor, Mr Vang can handle this easily by letting out the sides an inch or so. Or else I could go on bread and water for a couple of weeks -- give up those thick grilled steaks bathed in butter. But that's a bit much, though, just to fit into some damn jacket, right?

Based on my research, retail prices for a Zegna sports jacket tends to be around $1500, and Jack Victor sportcoats run around $500 in the shops. Not a bad day for me, I'll say.
Many,many years ago, as a young fellow, I used to regularly haunt the trout streams in central Pennsylvania, spending long hours to fill my creel and catch my limit. I almost never did catch my limit, but then again I cannot recall ever being skunked. However a good friend of mine seemed to always catch his limit...his fishing skills were incredible. It seems that way with your thrifting, my friend. You really know your stuff and that makes your good fortune in those efforts. Congrats on your thrifting success! ;)
 
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