Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I think if you are tall (and I seem to recall you are), you can pull it off. If you saw me in something yellow, I think you would react the way I did when I first experienced Clouseau in 1975.
Very funny.

Years ago, I worked with a young woman who was very short and petite - just under 5' would be my guess - and on rainy days she would wear a bright orange rain slicker with a hood that came to a point. I never said anything, but always thought she looked like a walking traffic cone in that slicker.

I'm 6'1", so I have the height, but at 150lbs, I have to be careful of vertical stripes (like pinstripes) as I can look like a pipe cleaner if I'm not thoughtful. Every body shape has its challenges. Heck, Cary Grant was self conscious of his "thick" neck and Grace Kelly thought her jaw-line was "too long."

Really, if those two beautiful people were uncomfortable with their looks, what hope is there for us mere mortals. That's why I'm going to buy the yellow rain gear, wear it with pride and enjoy it.
 
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peterc

Super Member
Re: Post 44. Your post is very well written and wise. I agree and always enjoy what you have to say. And, thank you for appreciating my Clouseau comment. He was a favorite in my house growing up.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
6'1" and 150lbs??? I finally understand the name "Fading Fast." lol
(Seriously, I am just really jealous)
I am one of those few people that struggles to keep weight on (I know, everyone hates me because of that), but it is just how I was built - and, despite what everyone thinks, it presents its own challenges. The funny thing is, the recent move toward slimmer clothes has actually help me find things that aren't too baggy. Before, "normal" fit for most people looked like a tent on me. Now, slim (not stupid skinny) looks on me, like traditional fits look on others. My guess, slim / skinny will go the way of all fashion cycles, so I'm selectively stocking up on slim cuts while they exist.

Fading Fast is both a play on words and a theme in that it reflects the ongoing disappearance of Trad attire (and, more broadly, many things from the era of the '30s - early '60s) that I love - they all seem to be fading fast. I took the name for the site "Fedora Lounge," which is devoted to all things of the "Golden Era," (like our definition of Trad, always argued over, but think post WWI up until the when the Hippies took over the '60s).

I stole the name from the Rolling Stones' song "Sister Morphine," as it reflects the anguish a drug addict feels as he is going through withdrawal and doesn't believe he will make it. It's a hauntingly beautiful and painful song of loss of hope, of despair, of individual physical and mental agony. While I don't feel quite the extreme dispiritedness of the song, the name seemed to nicely capture the challenge fans of that era feel as we see it slipping away.

And to meekly and weakly tie this post back to our thread's theme: "Sister Morphine" is one of the Stone's most underrated and overlooked songs.
 

kev'n

New Member
I don't understand the premise of this thread at all. Mall brands like Club Monaco, Massimo Dutti, and Polo can be underrated, but they certainly can't be overlooked. Bottega Veneta can be overlooked due to exclusivity and availability, but it can't be considered underrated as it's one of the premiere makers of leather goods with a price tag befitting that designation as well.

Drake's, Kamakura, Everlane, and Hober all sound like good fits to underrated and overlooked. I'll add -

Vass shoes: Completely handwelted and handmade, and very reasonably priced compared to the competition when purchased direct.
Chester Jefferies gloves: Bespoke gloves for less than higher end dept store prices.
Equus Belts: Basically same as above, custom made belts at a very reasonable price.
E. Marinella, E&G Cappelli, Bigi, and Breuer ties: All fantastic quality, not well-known at all outside menswear circles, and all available at serious discounts if you know where to look.
Were please tell does one look for the available at serious discounts?
 

Cassadine

Super Member
I am one of those few people that struggles to keep weight on (I know, everyone hates me because of that), but it is just how I was built - and, despite what everyone thinks, it presents its own challenges. The funny thing is, the recent move toward slimmer clothes has actually help me find things that aren't too baggy. Before, "normal" fit for most people looked like a tent on me. Now, slim (not stupid skinny) looks on me, like traditional fits look on others. My guess, slim / skinny will go the way of all fashion cycles, so I'm selectively stocking up on slim cuts while they exist.

Fading Fast is both a play on words and a theme in that it reflects the ongoing disappearance of Trad attire (and, more broadly, many things from the era of the '30s - early '60s) that I love - they all seem to be fading fast. I took the name for the site "Fedora Lounge," which is devoted to all things of the "Golden Era," (like our definition of Trad, always argued over, but think post WWI up until the when the Hippies took over the '60s).

I stole the name from the Rolling Stones' song "Sister Morphine," as it reflects the anguish a drug addict feels as he is going through withdrawal and doesn't believe he will make it. It's a hauntingly beautiful and painful song of loss of hope, of despair, of individual physical and mental agony. While I don't feel quite the extreme dispiritedness of the song, the name seemed to nicely capture the challenge fans of that era feel as we see it slipping away.

And to meekly and weakly tie this post back to our thread's theme: "Sister Morphine" is one of the Stone's most underrated and overlooked songs.
Some of the best Stones songs are NEVER on the radio. Not since the 70's when WNEW in NYC would routinely play what today are ingloriously called "deep cuts'.
 

Cassadine

Super Member
I've had great providence with American made Frye boots, especially the Arkansas. They're unlined because they are more on the country/rough end of the spectrum. But they're nearly as well crafted on the sole and heel as an Alden. The walnut takes on a great patina with regular use of dark brown polish.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Geez, are you guys as old as I am:). Okay, who was the gravel voiced DJ caught up in the payola scandal? Allison passed much too soon.
At 54, the payola stuff (at least its "heyday") pre-dates me :). I do remember reading about it, but wasn't that more of a '50s thing?

Although, I do remember some DJ pay-for-play scandal popping up in the '70s too, but no memory of which DJs were involved.

If you didn't live through it, it is hard to appreciate the cultural impact and importance, in the '70s, of stations like WNEW and its DJs.
 
At 54, the payola stuff (at least its "heyday") pre-dates me :). I do remember reading about it, but wasn't that more of a '50s thing?

Although, I do remember some DJ pay-for-play scandal popping up in the '70s too, but no memory of which DJs were involved.

If you didn't live through it, it is hard to appreciate the cultural impact and importance, in the '70s, of stations like WNEW and its DJs.
Alan Freed was one of the most prominent ones involved. It destroyed him. Even without being sentenced to any prison time, he became a useless alcoholic. He died penniless at 43.
 

EclecticSr.

Super Member
At 54, the payola stuff (at least its "heyday") pre-dates me :). I do remember reading about it, but wasn't that more of a '50s thing?

Although, I do remember some DJ pay-for-play scandal popping up in the '70s too, but no memory of which DJs were involved.

If you didn't live through it, it is hard to appreciate the cultural impact and importance, in the '70s, of stations like WNEW and its DJs.
Scott Muni
 
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