Upon Request: A Plethora of Shirts

Flanderian

Connoisseur
White on blue strped twill with spread collar -


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Who says Europeans can't cut a decent BD collar? Handsome longer point tattersall BD.


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And another in blue grid check -


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Tim Correll

Elite Member
Personally, I like the bar collars, clip collars, tab collars and wide spread collars the best of the bunch.
 
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Flanderian

Connoisseur
Personally, I like the bar collars (and the collars with the jewelry similar to the collar bar), tab collars and wide spread collars the best of the bunch.

Me to.

Had my shirtmaker make a collar for me that was a little shorter than the collar above, but longer than most club collars. I had most of them made with eyelets as I prefer that to sticking a ;pin through them. Had it made longer to better accommodate knots, and be in better proportion with my larger head. The solution worked well.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Beautiful white on blue pencil stripe with soft longer point spread collar on a hi8gher neckband.


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Houndstooth with longer point cut a way collar. Love the cloth and collar choice. A taste of country pattern with a city collar. Adds a touch of panache to a dark city suit, while remaining proper.


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Dove grey luscious pinwale corduroy casual shirt. (And shell buttons?) Nicely cut BD. I can't wear most grey shirts as they tend to be very unflattering to my coloring, but this would likely be an exception.

When younger, I used to sometimes enjoy wearing such a shirt casually with a tweed jacket and tie. If well done,, the result was a subtle but extremely rich in the interplay of textures among all 3 elements. Usually chose a darker silk tie in a more casual paisley or check pattern. A wool challis also works, but good luck working any wool tie around the neckband! Like Velcro.


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EclecticSr.

Super Member
Back in the mid 60s I favored club collars with eyelets though not exclusively, they were quite easy to find OTR, and then there was Custom shirt shops. Today I favor spread wide band collars.
I like you could never stick a pin through a collar without eyelets. I have a few , brand new with point collars and eyelets, now if I could come up with occasions to wear them. Have so many other shirts still in the box. I guess I had great expectations.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Back in the mid 60s I favored club collars with eyelets though not exclusively, they were quite easy to find OTR, and then there was Custom shirt shops. Today I favor spread wide band collars.
I like you could never stick a pin through a collar without eyelets. I have a few , brand new with point collars and eyelets, now if I could come up with occasions to wear them. Have so many other shirts still in the box. I guess I had great expectations.

No kidding! Difficult to find occasions to wear my remaining core collection of ties, which must still approach 100. At one time it was a lust, and I probably averaged finding one every other week. And I still love them, but they hang serenely, but unseen, in my closet, destined to outlast me. But I still love them too dearly to bid farewell.

I stopped poking pins through my collar upon ruining a new club collar shirt's lining. As with most bespoke shirts, the collar fit well but snuggly, and the strains put on the collar during a normal day of wear caused the lining, though not the cloth, to tear within the collar.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
^^ We could have dueling tie collections.
I prefer peaceful coexistence!

My 3 main sources were Paul Stuart, Polo and now defunct NJ retailer, Roots. Paul Stuart was in a league of their own. Some favorites include wool challis prints in unusual colors, paisleys already being less common among wool challis ties. I have one that includes ochre and dark teal on an aubergine ground. Always found their assortment of Italian crunchy crochet knit ties special too. Many great wool tartans also.

Polo things I particularly enjoy include wool tweed ties that were made up of bolt ends from their sport jackets or suits. And I have two ties in very finely rendered large art deco designs, one silk and one wool. Rust and dark purple grounds respectively.

Roots provided a lot of solid silk paisley and emblematic club ties.

I still also have a trio of inexpensive wool kni0 ties from the original Lands End, purchased because I loved the Fairisle pattern, and purchased one in each of the 3 color ways.

Breaks my heart to know that at best they'll all wind up in a thrift shop lacking all context, or a discerning audience.
 
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EclecticSr.

Super Member
I prefer peaceful coexistence!

My 3 main sources were Paul Stuart, Polo and now defunct NJ retailer, Roots. Paul Stuart was in a league of their own. Some favorites include wool challis prints in unusual colors, paisleys already being less common among wool challis ties. I have one that includes ochre and dark teal on an aubergine ground. Always found their assortment of Italian crunchy crochet knit ties special too. Many great wool tartans also.

Polo things I particularly enjoy include wool tweed ties that were made up of bolt ends from their sport jackets or suits. And I have two ties in very finely rendered large art deco designs, one silk and one wool. Rust and dark purple grounds respectively.

Roots provided a lot of solid silk paisley and emblematic club ties.

I still also have a trio of inexpensive wool knit ties, purchased because I loved the Fairisle design, and purchased one in each of the 3 color ways.

Breaks my heart to know that at best they'll all wind up in a thrift shop lacking all context, or a discerning audience.

I have a decent collection of Paul Stuart as well, a few Polo and assorted Italian make as well as many from various other sources. I agree about Stuart, I always grabbed at least one from their collection each time they introduced a few new ones.

I feel your pain, so each year I gift 2-3 new, to my financial advisor who has always admired my manner of dress and has looked to me for clothing and tailoring advice, sort of a reversal of roles.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
I have a decent collection of Paul Stuart as well, a few Polo and assorted Italian make as well as many from various other sources. I agree about Stuart, I always grabbed at least one from their collection each time they introduced a few new ones.

I feel your pain, so each year I gift 2-3 new, to my financial advisor who has always admired my manner of dress and has looked to me for clothing and tailoring advice, sort of a reversal of roles.

A marvelous solution!

Alas, I have no professional associates who might have an interest. (But perhaps I shall give it a bit more thought.) Two daughters, no sons, and while fine son-in-laws, sartorial pleasures are not among their interests.
 

EclecticSr.

Super Member
A marvelous solution!

Alas, I have no professional associates who might have an interest. (But perhaps I shall give it a bit more thought.) Two daughters, no sons, and while fine son-in-laws, sartorial pleasures are not among their interests.


Have a son who towers over me by about 6", I'm 6' so no passing on to him and not all that interested in things sartorial but dresses well when he has to thanks to Dad.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Blue glen check with white overplaid and longer point cutaway collar.


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Very high count blue and white fancy stripe with long point BD.


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Blue graph check with high neckband cutaway collar with shorter points and lots of tie space.


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Matt S

Connoisseur
Beautiful work. I love the buttons they use. My only complaint would be that I wish they would angle the collar band downwards in front. With a high collar band, it helps prevent the band from showing above a tie knot.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Beautiful work. I love the buttons they use. My only complaint would be that I wish they would angle the collar band downwards in front. With a high collar band, it helps prevent the band from showing above a tie knot.

Interesting point, Matt, as that is their common practice on most shirts. I could conjecture, but I'd only be guessing.

One of the things I find remarkable about Daniel Levy is how aesthetically successful he is with a huge range of collar style, fronts, band heights. It appears he can exactly capture his clients' wishes, as well as fit their dimensions.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Beautiful royal blue awning stripe with longer point BD. This would likely be a casual shirt for me.


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Handsome round white collar on grey twill body. Love grey shirts, but they don't love me back. Found if I substitute black for grey in patterns, it works. I think if this were a black hairline, the effect might be similar, but would work with my coloring.


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Terrific burgundy Bengal stripe with longer point spread collar.


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Tim Correll

Elite Member
All of these collars are high cut I noticed. With the exception of short necked people, people look much better in high cut collars than low cut ones (especially long necked people, who look dreadful in low cut collars).

Short necked people look just as dreadful in high cut collars as long necked people look in low cut collars.

High cut collars exaggerate the lack of height with short necks. By the same amount, low cut collars exaggerate the immense height with long necks.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
All of these collars are high cut I noticed. With the exception of short necked people, people look much better in high cut collars than low cut ones (especially long necked people, who look dreadful in low cut collars).

Short necked people look just as dreadful in high cut collars as long necked people look in low cut collars.

High cut collars exaggerate the lack of height with short necks. By the same amount, low cut collars exaggerate the immense height with long necks.

I think you make a number of significant and valid observations concerning the nuances of fit which are most flattering to different men. That degree of detail can make worlds of difference in appearance.

As noted, M. Levy cuts shirts with neckbands of varying heights. It appears he varies them according to the collar type, and to the physiques and preferences of individual clients, which IMHO is what is the most appropriate practice. His collars are also cut with a fairly low slope, so that when worn most do not fit especially high on the neck, as depicted in the photo below of M. Levy wearing, presumably, one of his own shirts with tie and jacket.


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Flanderian

Connoisseur
Extra long point soft spread color. Redolent of those from the '30's and '40's. This one with a placket, again demonstrating M. Levy's flexibility of mode.


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Longer point spread color in box check cloth.


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Spread collar luxurious Sea Island Cotton denim shirt. Wow! Would love it, only with a placket.


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Flanderian

Connoisseur
Beautiful navy and white cotton & cashmere herringbone BD.


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Rare and beautiful forest green, closely spaced pencil stripes with spread collar. Can help create an entirely new realm with earth tone jackets and suits.


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Blue and white yarn in I believe royal oxford. Creates a micro check pattern on this BD.


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