VS

Super Member
quote:Originally posted by Mr. Checks


My favorite right now is Arch Digest. I'm just getting into that stuff, and, in the obsessive/compulsive male way, reading everything I can get my hands on. It was AD that convinced me that my future is not in my McMansion, but in some perfectly decorated apartment in NYC, Chicago, or DC.
Yes, I love AD. I subscribe to very few magazines and publications right now and read most of my news online.

But in paper form, I get AD, the Sunday NYT, UK Elle Decor, Veranda.

I used to LOVE Spy magazine and have a huge boxful of them. Private Eye is good but not as good.
 

Yckmwia

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
quote:Originally posted by Mr. Checks

I used to post on Audio Asylum. Those people drove me nuts. They combined the worst aspects of the hobby, squared by the anonymity of the internet.
One of the funniest features that Stereophile ran during the years I read the magazine (I don't know if they still do) was the musician's home system column. Almost invariably, the quality of the artist's system was inverse to his genius. The column featuring Milt Jackson was hilarious: he listened to CDs on $20 tabletop boombox. The Stereophile columnist couldn't get past that: he kept telling Bags that he'd set him up right, get a load of equipment donated by high-end manufacturers so that poor, benighted Milt Jackson could finally listen to music properly. Bags wasn't interested in the least. The dolt interviewing him wouldn't let the matter drop, and kept telling him what he was missing by not having an audiophile quality music system - what Milt Jackson was missing! It was an amazing column, for many reasons. As I recall, the only "celebrity" that had a really high-end system was Fabio.

"There are some people that if they don't know, you can't tell 'em." Louis Armstrong.
 

Jill

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
D Magazine (local to Dallas), Veranda, Menswear, Menswear Retailing, Travel, Travel and Leisure, Aficionado, Town and Country, Robb Report, National Review. Occasionally pick up GQ or Esquire, but not so much lately.
 

AddisonBelmont

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Harpers, the Atlantic, Scientific American, The New Yorker, Collectible Automobile. My favorite, however, is The World of Interiors, each issue of which includes at least one well-preserved--but unrestored--historic interior filled with visible signs of contemporary daily life--comfortable sofas with faded damask upholstery, vases with flowers that are on the decline, walls that were last painted sometime in the 192Os, and, cascading off the marble-topped William Kent table on to the threadbare perian rug, an avalanche of unopened mail. The confluence of old money, privilege, history, good taste and the all-pervading sense of what-the-hell benign neglect that these rooms display is quite hypnotic, and these places makes the gleaming silver & polished mahogany in Ralph Lauren's ad's look downright glitzy.
 

jbmcb

Senior Member
quote:Originally posted by AddisonBelmont
The confluence of old money, privilege, history, good taste and the all-pervading sense of what-the-hell benign neglect that these rooms display is quite hypnotic, and these places makes the gleaming silver & polished mahogany in Ralph Lauren's ad's look downright glitzy.
I went on my first Oak Park house tour in the Chicago area last year (highly recocmended to all.) My favorite house was a relatively plain tudor style home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright's architectural firm. It was, literally, half-way into a massive DIY rennovation. Newer wallpaper was peeled off, revealing the beautiful, faded victorian style fabric beneath (the owners were having the pattern replicated for the rennovation.) Floors were stripped of paint to their original grain. Walls were brought down revealing the original floor plan. Great stuff.


Good/Fast/Cheap - Pick Two
 

Mr. Checks

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
quote:Originally posted by Yckmwia

quote:Originally posted by Mr. Checks

I used to post on Audio Asylum. Those people drove me nuts. They combined the worst aspects of the hobby, squared by the anonymity of the internet.
One of the funniest features that Stereophile ran during the years I read the magazine (I don't know if they still do) was the musician's home system column. Almost invariably, the quality of the artist's system was inverse to his genius. The column featuring Milt Jackson was hilarious: he listened to CDs on $20 tabletop boombox. The Stereophile columnist couldn't get past that: he kept telling Bags that he'd set him up right, get a load of equipment donated by high-end manufacturers so that poor, benighted Milt Jackson could finally listen to music properly. Bags wasn't interested in the least. The dolt interviewing him wouldn't let the matter drop, and kept telling him what he was missing by not having an audiophile quality music system - what Milt Jackson was missing! It was an amazing column, for many reasons. As I recall, the only "celebrity" that had a really high-end system was Fabio.

"There are some people that if they don't know, you can't tell 'em." Louis Armstrong.
Yes, Fabio had the monster electrostats and an 8-quadrillion watt amp, IIRC. I don't recall the Milt Jackson one, but my view has always been that true musicians don't need the kind of resolution my system offers; their ears kind of fill in what my ears need to be told expressly.
 

Yckmwia

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
quote:Originally posted by Mr. Checks

quote:Originally posted by Yckmwia

quote:Originally posted by Mr. Checks

I used to post on Audio Asylum. Those people drove me nuts. They combined the worst aspects of the hobby, squared by the anonymity of the internet.
One of the funniest features that Stereophile ran during the years I read the magazine (I don't know if they still do) was the musician's home system column. Almost invariably, the quality of the artist's system was inverse to his genius. The column featuring Milt Jackson was hilarious: he listened to CDs on $20 tabletop boombox. The Stereophile columnist couldn't get past that: he kept telling Bags that he'd set him up right, get a load of equipment donated by high-end manufacturers so that poor, benighted Milt Jackson could finally listen to music properly. Bags wasn't interested in the least. The dolt interviewing him wouldn't let the matter drop, and kept telling him what he was missing by not having an audiophile quality music system - what Milt Jackson was missing! It was an amazing column, for many reasons. As I recall, the only "celebrity" that had a really high-end system was Fabio.

"There are some people that if they don't know, you can't tell 'em." Louis Armstrong.
Yes, Fabio had the monster electrostats and an 8-quadrillion watt amp, IIRC. I don't recall the Milt Jackson one, but my view has always been that true musicians don't need the kind of resolution my system offers; their ears kind of fill in what my ears need to be told expressly.
Right, that's exactly what John Lee Hooker said when he was interviewed by the same fellow who took Milt Jackson to task. Hooker actually had a decent off-the-shelf consumer system IIRC: Technics components, something like that - still the Stereophile fellow thought it inadequate. Fabio had huge Martin-Logan electrostats, driven by a couple thousand watts of Krell power. He boasted that the low end induced abdominal pain and that he had thousands of dollars in unused cables and interconnects. His listening room looked horrible: a big marble-lined space in his Bel Air Mansion. Still, I imagine it sounded good.

"There are some people that if they don't know, you can't tell 'em." Louis Armstrong.
 

Mahler

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
The New Yorker, New York Review of Books, and a few academic journals. Used to have a subscription to The Spectator when I lived in England. I have recently stopped subscribing to The Economist -- much as I appreciate the quality of writing, their heavy-handed ideological line made me sick in the end, especially since the start of the war in Iraq. Plus, don't have time for more than two weeklies these days.
 

jbmcb

Senior Member
quote:Originally posted by Spudbunny

quote:
I used to be into Stereophile and The Absolute Sound, but then I started working for a consumer electronics company testing audio gear, and a lot of that stuff sounds like nonsense now.
Why do you say that?
I work with people who design and test audio gear for a living. I'm directly involved in a lot of it, and a lot of what those magazines peddle is snake oil. There is rarely a decent protocol for evaluating gear, beyond "Wow, that sounds great!" The second opinion comes in the form of "Hey doesn't that sound great?" "Yeah, sure does!" Listening tests I've been involved with have shown me that human hearing is a very lousy and subjective evaluator of audio equipment.

I came to the realization that a lot of audiophiledom was hogwash when I was working on an S/PDIF system, a method of transferring digital audio from digital audio source to DAC. Much is made of reducing jitter, or timing errors, in this link, to the point where audiophile companies build multi-thousand dollar CD transports and DACs to reduce the amount of jitter. Jitter can be, basically, eliminated, by using an I2S link instead of S/PDIF, or buffering the incoming S/PDIF signal into RAM and reclocking. Total cost of either solution: about $20.



Good/Fast/Cheap - Pick Two
 

jbmcb

Senior Member
quote:Originally posted by pinchi22

quote:I came to the realization that a lot of audiophiledom was hogwash
Allright, what is your current system?
Used McIntosh front-end and a Denon DVD player with Magnepan speakers. I find McIntosh equipment to be the cheapest, well-built gear you can get. It lasts forever and McIntosh supports out of production equipment well. Before my current setup I was using a 30 year old MA6100 integrated amp that my Mom is still using.

I built my own subwoofer and cables, as I find cheap cables tend to fall apart after switching them around.


Good/Fast/Cheap - Pick Two
 

Mr. Checks

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
quote:Originally posted by jbmcb

quote:Originally posted by Spudbunny

quote:
I used to be into Stereophile and The Absolute Sound, but then I started working for a consumer electronics company testing audio gear, and a lot of that stuff sounds like nonsense now.
Why do you say that?
I work with people who design and test audio gear for a living. I'm directly involved in a lot of it, and a lot of what those magazines peddle is snake oil. There is rarely a decent protocol for evaluating gear, beyond "Wow, that sounds great!" The second opinion comes in the form of "Hey doesn't that sound great?" "Yeah, sure does!" Listening tests I've been involved with have shown me that human hearing is a very lousy and subjective evaluator of audio equipment.

I came to the realization that a lot of audiophiledom was hogwash when I was working on an S/PDIF system, a method of transferring digital audio from digital audio source to DAC. Much is made of reducing jitter, or timing errors, in this link, to the point where audiophile companies build multi-thousand dollar CD transports and DACs to reduce the amount of jitter. Jitter can be, basically, eliminated, by using an I2S link instead of S/PDIF, or buffering the incoming S/PDIF signal into RAM and reclocking. Total cost of either solution: about $20.



Good/Fast/Cheap - Pick Two
I don't make any claims to "the absolute sound" but I doubt there's any machine that can measure what an attentive listener with a good set of ears can experience. That test hasn't been invented.

FWIW: My system is: Cary amps, Conrad-Johnson pre, Sony SACD, VPI/Benz Glider turntable, Arcam CD, Meadowlark Shearwater speakers, synergestic research cables, Monster power filter.
 

Martinis at 8

Super Member
I have subscriptions to The Economist and Foreign Affairs. I think both are a must for those of us who work in international environments. In addition, subscribers have online access.

I have not found a decent men's magazine. However, I am impressed with the new Men's Vogue (US) and may suscribe to that.
 

Wayfarer

Honors Member<br>P-Bomb
I tend to cycle in what I am willing to pay for on a subscription basis, so I usually do not have all of these going at once. Some titles on my cycle though are The Economist, various healthcare management trade journals, Wired, Robb Report, Arizona Highways, Southwest Living, 2600, Golf Digest, MacCleans, and then my only constant that I always have an active subscription to is Piper and Drummer, the definitive magazine for the pipe band scene and bagpipers in general.
 

jamgood

Elite Member
Varmit Hunter, Cable Car Trader, Bulletin de l'Association Internationale de Anciens Roseens ( www.aiar.ch ), Uzzi Aficionado, Le Philateliste, Curmudgeon, TV Guide, Bohemian Grove Fortnight, Progressive Farmer, Krypto-Bilderburger, Cock Fight Illustrated, Illuminati Scenario, O, Adult Beverage Enthusiast (formerly Drunk), Boom Box-Ghetto Blaster Classics Review, Uninformed Opinion, Road Rage, Packaged Food Contents Label Digest, Journal Of Pro Sports Locker Room Eloquence(a 2 page biannual), Hot Babes Of The Sahara, Compulsive Consumer, Popular Psychosis, DIY Meds

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Southern Semi-literate Rural Rustic Cou Rouge www.scotshistoryonline.co.uk/rednecks/rednecks.html

jamgood on ebay &gt; https://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZjamgoodQQhtZ-!
 
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