epl0517

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Some enticing choices currently available for footwear for outdoor activities:

BROWN CHROMEXCEL INDY 403 BOOT (Alden)
https://epauletnewyork.com/collections/footwear/products/brown-chromexcel-indy-403-boot

DARK BROWN KUDU INDY 404 BOOT (Alden)
https://epauletnewyork.com/products/dark-brown-kudu-indy-404-boot

HETRE BARENIA MORO RAVEL (Heschung)
https://www.heschung.com/en/754-hetre-barenia-moro-ravel.html


Heschung boots are constructed with the more weather-proof Norwegian welt, compared to Alden's use of the storm welt. However, the special Horween tannages in these versions of the Indy are very appealing.

One question I couldn't find answered is specifically the difference between the the Kudu leather (which is from cattle not kudu) and the regular chromexel.

[Incidentally, what is the name and function of the loops at the top of the back of the uppers on the Heschung?]
 
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SG_67

Connoisseur
For foul weather, the Heschung or the Alden Kudu based in the sole. The Indy boot won't give you much grip, at least not that sole.

RogerP's comment about the durability of the Alden notwithstanding, I'd opt for the Heschung as it is more appealing and the welt will provide better weather resistance.

As for the loop, I use it to help pull the boot on. Not sure that's the intended purpose but makes sense to me.
 

cdavant

Elite Member
I have the 403 in Chromexcel. Wonderful boot, but I'd never wear it if I thought traction could be a problem. I hope to live long enough to wear them down enough to justify sending them to bNelson for a commando or Danite sole.
 

momsdoc

Connoisseur
I have been using the Heschung Zermatt boot during all the snow and ice we've had. I've never had a boot with a surer grip. I have not even noticed any dampness with the Norwegian welt. That V-tread is the bomb in the snow.
 
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godan

Elite Member
For a few miles in today's fresh snow and urban slush, I wore a pair of older Lowa mountain boots. The leather had softened too much for climbs above timberline, but the Gore-Tex still kept my feet dry. Mountain boots may be a bit too technical-looking for the OP, but quality brands with Vibram soles and Gore-Tex membranes are the gold standard in this area.
 

epl0517

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
For a few miles in today's fresh snow and urban slush, I wore a pair of older Lowa mountain boots. The leather had softened too much for climbs above timberline, but the Gore-Tex still kept my feet dry. Mountain boots may be a bit too technical-looking for the OP, but quality brands with Vibram soles and Gore-Tex membranes are the gold standard in this area.
What might be good examples of boots of this ilk that don't include modern features, such as brightly-colored nylon components, intended to reduce costs and make an elaborate appearance. In other words, what is available that successfully marries the more technical features with classical elegance?
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
^ There's a common misconception regarding technical boots and please don't take this the wrong way, but the brightly colored nylon components aren't just for show. They serve a purpose as these are technical boots with are purpose built. Nylon is water repellent and lighter. The bright colors stand out in the snow and allow one to be seen, and could be a lifesaver in the case of an avalanche.

As with most other technical garments, they've been adapted to urban wear and so seem somewhat excessive and out of place.
 

godan

Elite Member
What might be good examples of boots of this ilk that don't include modern features, such as brightly-colored nylon components, intended to reduce costs and make an elaborate appearance. In other words, what is available that successfully marries the more technical features with classical elegance?
Take a look at the Danner website to see boots that I and others wear for high altitude mountaineering in all seasons. However, most good modern boots are composite and may not meet your standards of classical elegance. I would certainly recommend a Gore-Tex membrane if you need boots that are waterPROOF, not just water resistant. There are people who do not like either Danner or Gore-Tex, but millions of others worldwide do. Good luck.
 

epl0517

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
^ There's a common misconception regarding technical boots and please don't take this the wrong way, but the brightly colored nylon components aren't just for show. They serve a purpose as these are technical boots with are purpose built. Nylon is water repellent and lighter. The bright colors stand out in the snow and allow one to be seen, and could be a lifesaver in the case of an avalanche.

As with most other technical garments, they've been adapted to urban wear and so seem somewhat excessive and out of place.
Thank you for this very useful information.

However, I am wondering why it appears that these components are associated with cheaper products.

Looking at the Danner range of hiking boots, for example, it would appear that the use of more details, particularly brightly-colored fabric, is characteristic of the lower-priced models, but not the higher priced, classic "Mountain Light" models. The "Mountain Lite II", priced slightly less, uses some nylon, but in neutral tones.

https://www.danner.com/product/hike/
 

epl0517

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Take a look at the Danner website to see boots that I and others wear for high altitude mountaineering in all seasons. However, most good modern boots are composite and may not meet your standards of classical elegance. I would certainly recommend a Gore-Tex membrane if you need boots that are waterPROOF, not just water resistant. There are people who do not like either Danner or Gore-Tex, but millions of others worldwide do. Good luck.
godan--

We posted replies near the same time, both referencing Danner.

You are saying that Danner is more the exception than the rule?
 

MaxBuck

Elite Member
I'm liking my AE Long Branch boots in Chromexcel with Vibram lugged soles. They're excellent for traction but look fine with my moleskin pants and blazer. (Not with the red laces, though.)

 

jm22

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Danners are great. I never used my standard issues boots and bought Danners. I worse the same pair for 35 days straight in the field and they were amazing on 20+ mile rucks. I can only imagine how great their mountaineering stuff is.
 

godan

Elite Member
godan--

We posted replies near the same time, both referencing Danner.

You are saying that Danner is more the exception than the rule?
Not sure I understand, but I am a Danner True Believer. zyxwvutsr, the Ft. Lewis Boot was, I believe, the first one that solved problems troops had endured since the Roman legions wore sandals into rainy Gaul. However, they are probably too tactical for the OP. jm22, modern Danner mountaineering boots are outstanding. I have the Talus models that are light and flexible enough to wear on the trail walking in and sturdy enough for the rock and ice above timberline. If the Mountain Lite has a Gore-Tex version, the OP might consider it seriously.
 

Kingstonian

Super Member
please don't take this the wrong way....The bright colors stand out in the snow and allow one to be seen, and could be a lifesaver in the case of an avalanche.
Do not think bright colours will suffice for Avalanche protection. Best advice is to avoid Avalanche conditions altogether.

Secondly do not venture out on your own, bring a transceiver, bring a shovel. Consider an inflatable rucksack as well.
 
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