shygddt

Starting Member
PRL polos are made in cambodia now and they shrink significantly more than the Vietnam made ones. Recently bought two that I probably won't wear anymore due to how much they've shrunk.
 

Doctor Damage

Connoisseur
One thing that really annoys me about the Ralphie shirt, and one of the main reasons I don't own a dozen of them, is the cloth tag that says "classic" fit or whatever is sewn to the shirt's yoke. It's a bad spot if you're the sort of person who is annoyed by tags, but as I learned to my regret taking those tags off is difficult and can result in tearing the cloth. If they were sewn to the neck seam it would be easy to remove. I kinda like Bean best: they print the info on the inside of the shirt and it wears off fairly quickly; no tags to rub.
 

Danny

Super Member
My favorite polo is still the BB one, although I have not bought any for a couple years, so not sure what they are like now. I also like the LL Bean ones. That about covers things for me. I prefer no logo, but if you have to have a logo...the Brooks logo is nice.
 

shygddt

Starting Member
My favorite polo is still the BB one, although I have not bought any for a couple years, so not sure what they are like now. I also like the LL Bean ones. That about covers things for me. I prefer no logo, but if you have to have a logo...the Brooks logo is nice.
Brooks has polos with stretch now. So disappointing.

Really hoping they don't phase out the 100% cotton ones.
 

drpeter

Super Member
There are so many threads about polo shirts, I can't search every message to see if someone has already mentioned this. But I find Lands' End 100% Pima cotton, Peruvian-made polo shirts to be top notch in appearance and quality. I think the Pima cotton also comes from Peru, but I am not certain. I haven't checked recently, but I believe they are reasonably priced. Once in a while, I see them with a Made in Hong Kong label. Most are short-sleeved, but one can also find long-sleeved ones, perfect for cooler weather, and for wearing under a cotton sport coat.

I have a whole slew of these LE Pima polos in all the colours I would want. The cloth has a soft hand, and a very graceful look. They have a nice cut and structure, wash and dry easily and do not wrinkle much. These shirts turn up with surprising regularity at my local thrift shops, they are often old stock and never worn, and their prices are laughably small! My current Community Thrift shop (formerly St Vinnie's) has a deal where you buy any one item of clothing for a flat rate of $2.50 and you get two more items free! Can anyone beat that?

Late edit: I thought I'd add this link:

https://business.landsend.com/Busin...Short-Sleeve-Banded-Pima-Polo-Shirt/p/1953113
 
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TKI67

Super Member
Although I have previously posted on this thread, I am firmly on board with O'Connell's pique polos. The knits may be good, too, but I find pique cooler. They are made in Peru, they are sized generously and have quite long tails, and they show minimal shrinkage. Although there are not a huge array of colors, they cover the classics. If you do not like logos they are offered with no logos (or with a buffalo or the Buffalo lighthouse). Even at regular prices they are reasonable at $55 per. The details remind me why I fell in love with pique polos in the 1960s.
 

GregorSamsa

New Member
Although I have previously posted on this thread, I am firmly on board with O'Connell's pique polos. The knits may be good, too, but I find pique cooler. They are made in Peru, they are sized generously and have quite long tails, and they show minimal shrinkage. Although there are not a huge array of colors, they cover the classics. If you do not like logos they are offered with no logos (or with a buffalo or the Buffalo lighthouse). Even at regular prices they are reasonable at $55 per. The details remind me why I fell in love with pique polos in the 1960s.
I have always been tempted to pick up some of these for the reasons you mention. I just can’t seem to get into the three buttons though.

You also mentioned that they are made in Peru, and I’ve noticed quite a few menswear brands offering made in Peru polos. I love the look of the knitted striped ones with a solid collar. Still three button though :/ . Anyone know who the maker is?
 

Danny

Super Member
Brooks has polos with stretch now. So disappointing.

Really hoping they don't phase out the 100% cotton ones.
What is it exactly that happened in the last 2-3 years with 'stretch' fabric? I feel like some manufacturer in Asia invented a technique to make cotton fabric with elastic materials integrated in and marketed it to 100% of clothing retailers. Overnight it seemed like all cotton trousers were 'stretch'. I understand the marketing pitch....A. overweight people [i.e. Americans] may feel comfortable in clothing that stretches and B. stretch wears out eventually and then you have to replace the garment. Good for retailers. It seemed to come into the marketplace all at once though. Was a bit odd.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I have always been tempted to pick up some of these for the reasons you mention. I just can’t seem to get into the three buttons though.

You also mentioned that they are made in Peru, and I’ve noticed quite a few menswear brands offering made in Peru polos. I love the look of the knitted striped ones with a solid collar. Still three button though :/ . Anyone know who the maker is?
I think the reason why so many polo shirts are made in Peru is because pima cotton is cultivated extensively in Peru. The coastal regions of that country are ideally suited to cotton cultivation. I am not sure if the pique shirts are woven from pima cotton, but I suspect they are. Here is more information on Peruvian pima cotton:
https://www.peruvianconnection.com/category/fiber+and+product+information/peruvian+pima+cotton.do
 

TKI67

Super Member
I have always been tempted to pick up some of these for the reasons you mention. I just can’t seem to get into the three buttons though.

You also mentioned that they are made in Peru, and I’ve noticed quite a few menswear brands offering made in Peru polos. I love the look of the knitted striped ones with a solid collar. Still three button though :/ . Anyone know who the maker is?
I assume the aversion to three buttons is a preference for two. If that is the case, I find the opening on the O'Connell's, despite three buttons, to be appropriately slight and unobtrusive, so much so that I had not really noticed it. I do not like the long placket look, such as Criquet. I find them non-trad and reminiscent of Kramer on Seinfeld.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I assume the aversion to three buttons is a preference for two. If that is the case, I find the opening on the O'Connell's, despite three buttons, to be appropriately slight and unobtrusive, so much so that I had not really noticed it. I do not like the long placket look, such as Criquet. I find them non-trad and reminiscent of Kramer on Seinfeld.
This discussion reminds me of shirts I used to see fairly commonly in India and colonial Malaya half a century ago. These shirts were made of broadcloth and had regular straight collars, short plackets with two or three buttons, and long sleeves. It was pretty much a standard shirt, except for the fact that it did not button all the way down in front, and had to be pulled over one's head. My Dad had several (some of them with detachable celluloid collars). I own a couple of shirts in this style, picked up on eBay, and like the ones I used to see in my youth, the ones I have are custom-tailored, by Ascot Chang. I like the look, but they are best worn tucked into one's trousers, they have a tendency to bunch up a little in front if worn un-tucked. I think in the first half of the twentieth century, these types of short placket shirts were fairly common. I have even seen formal shirts with stud fronts and wing collars that have similarly short plackets.

It is also interesting to note that short plackets exist in other styles of shirts. The Indian kurta is a well-known version, with a band collar and a long body from anywhere near regular shirt lengths to well past the knee. Versions of the kurta also have embroidery around the placket. At this point, we have come far afield from the Western polo shirt, but the historic connections between the evolution of the Western shirt and its counterparts in other regions of the world might be an enjoyable area of study for those interested in clothes and styles. I'll see if such an analysis has been undertaken by anyone.
 
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TKI67

Super Member
This discussion reminds me of shirts I used to see fairly commonly some decades ago. These shirts were made of broadcloth and had regular (not button down) collars, short plackets with two or three buttons, and long sleeves. It was pretty much a standard shirt, except for the fact that it did not button all the way down, and had to be pulled over one's head. My Dad had several, some of them with detachable celluloid collars. I own a couple of these shirts picked up on eBay, and like the ones I used to see in my youth, the ones I picked up were custom-tailored, by Ascot Chang. I like the look, but they are best worn tucked into one's trousers, they have a tendency to bunch up a little in front if worn un-tucked. I think in the first half of the twentieth century, these types of short placket shirts were fairly common. I have even seen formal shirts with stud fronts and wing collars that have similarly short plackets.

It is also interesting to note that short plackets exist in other styles of shirts. The Indian kurta is a well-known version, with a band collar and a long body from anywhere near regular shirt lengths to well past the knee. Versions of the kurta also have embroidery around the placket. At this point, we have come far afield from the Western polo shirt, but the historic connections between the evolution of the Western shirt and its counterparts in other regions of the world might be an enjoyable area of study for those interested in clothes and styles. I'll see if such an analysis has been undertaken by anyone.
I remember those pullover shirts. I had one, and it was bizarre. It was a synthetic fabric that quickly assumed a dingy tone which began as white. It had a fairly short point button down collar, a lefthand chest pocket, and (drum roll) a deep, about 1", hem that went to a V back and front so that it could be worn untucked. I have no recollection how it entered or exited my life as it was the mid-1960s, and both my father and I wore Gant, Eagle, or Hathaway shirts.

I find these sorts of designs quite interesting. Just because I am a hidebound TNSIL type doesn't mean I cannot appreciate diversity! In Austin one sees a lot of polos. The only shirts more common are tee shirts. Yet you very rarely see a very traditional polo like Brooks, RPL, or Lacoste except for hipsters who seem to like the super slim Lacostes. What you see are very fitted modern fabrics, usually touted for their wicking properties and, far too often in our climate, in black!

i note more and more people embracing these newly created fabrics, and quite honestly some look pretty nice. We have come a long way from the Ban-Lon of the early 1960s.
 

drpeter

Super Member
I remember those pullover shirts. I had one, and it was bizarre. It was a synthetic fabric that quickly assumed a dingy tone which began as white. It had a fairly short point button down collar, a lefthand chest pocket, and (drum roll) a deep, about 1", hem that went to a V back and front so that it could be worn untucked. I have no recollection how it entered or exited my life as it was the mid-1960s, and both my father and I wore Gant, Eagle, or Hathaway shirts.

I find these sorts of designs quite interesting. Just because I am a hidebound TNSIL type doesn't mean I cannot appreciate diversity! In Austin one sees a lot of polos. The only shirts more common are tee shirts. Yet you very rarely see a very traditional polo like Brooks, RPL, or Lacoste except for hipsters who seem to like the super slim Lacostes. What you see are very fitted modern fabrics, usually touted for their wicking properties and, far too often in our climate, in black!

i note more and more people embracing these newly created fabrics, and quite honestly some look pretty nice. We have come a long way from the Ban-Lon of the early 1960s.
That is indeed bizarre! Probably your shirt would have fit well into Kramer's wardrobe.

TNSIL -- I had to look that up, LOL. Traditional Natural Shoulder Ivy League is what I found.

Sometimes I get thrown a bit when I hear the Brooks Brothers Polo Shirt mentioned. This was the original term used by BB for the button-down shirt they copied from English polo players and popularized in the US. Now those shirts are rarely called polo shirts (or more accurately, polo collar shirts), and the term has been taken over by the short placket, half sleeve, knits that we all wear.

I think the evolution of shirts is, like many other items of menswear, governed by an arc that bends towards comfort and informality. I understand this, and yet, I also wish that there was room for some degree of formality in our social settings, so that formal dressing has a place in our everyday life. When I taught at university, I liked to dress somewhat formally, in sport coat and tie, and it helped to maintain a certain line between myself and my jeans-clad charges. I wanted to emphasize the fact that I was their teacher, and not their pal. On the whole, I think this strategy worked out, and the students also were appreciative of my sartorial efforts.
 

TKI67

Super Member
That is indeed bizarre! Probably your shirt would have fit well into Kramer's wardrobe.

TNSIL -- I had to look that up, LOL. Traditional Natural Shoulder Ivy League is what I found.

Sometimes I get thrown a bit when I hear the Brooks Brothers Polo Shirt mentioned. This was the original term used by BB for the button-down shirt they copied from English polo players and popularized in the US. Now those shirts are rarely called polo shirts (or more accurately, polo collar shirts), and the term has been taken over by the short placket, half sleeve, knits that we all wear.

I think the evolution of shirts is, like many other items of menswear, governed by an arc that bends towards comfort and informality. I understand this, and yet, I also wish that there was room for some degree of formality in our social settings, so that formal dressing has a place in our everyday life. When I taught at university, I liked to dress somewhat formally, in sport coat and tie, and it helped to maintain a certain line between myself and my jeans-clad charges. I wanted to emphasize the fact that I was their teacher, and not their pal. On the whole, I think this strategy worked out, and the students also were appreciative of my sartorial efforts.
How easily I adopted the convention of calling the Brooks knit sleeve shirts polos, forgetting that was what they called OCBDs when they were introduced. Ironically, Brooks Brothers has done the same thing! Yes, TNSIL is the best I can do, because the term Trad seems to need particularization. Harris' original premise, the J. Press, Andover Shop crew, is in my experience a fairly narrow slice of what this Forum treats as Trad. The term preppy is distasteful to a lot of folks, but It actually fits me pretty well if you go by Birnbach's criteria. I always appreciated teachers and professors who dressed well. I perceived it as a model to grow into. I, too, like preserving some formality. I often recall Harriet Vane in Gaudy Night observing that as people grew older they appreciated formality more (although I am sure Sayers said it far better than I paraphrased it). I am drifting far afield from "best polo," but it occurs to me that people who link the death of traditional clothing (articles on Brooks and their ilk) as symbolic of the end of a world run by and for old white men may have missed a point: Diversity is enriching. My keeping up my mode of dress and appreciation for formality actually contribute to diversity in this world that has mostly gone on to other things.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I thought an image of the short placket shirt might be useful. I think it is called a popover placket:


View attachment 48554
Several year back I went a little crazy over Popovers, buying one of every design I could find that fit me. Then I developed a midriff, over which a popover shirt didn't look quite right. The popovers are still hidden away somewhere in this hoard, but haven't been worn in years! :(
 

TKI67

Super Member
Several year back I went a little crazy over Popovers, buying one of every design I could find that fit me. Then I developed a midriff, over which a popover shirt didn't look quite right. The popovers are still hidden away somewhere in this hoard, but haven't been worn in years! :(
I am waiting for someone to say "I love popovers. I could eat a basket of them!"
 
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