“Cocktail Attire” … Definition?

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Super Member
1,327
United States
Washington
Bainbridge Island
Particulars. I commissioned the piece.

The request regarding the potential donation of the score was made somewhat indirectly ... and there was no implication of time frame. Moreover, the request came at the end of a conversation which was mostly gratitude for my having made the commission. And ... I did not make any commitment.

Perhaps I should give it some time ... and talk to the composer about it.
 
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Droog

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
198
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Pennsylvania
Warrington
Unless you are in some relationship with the requesting individual or organization, I say keep it for as long as it pleases you, if not forever. Asking for it in any shape or form so soon was the act of a vulgarian that you are under no obligation to honor.
 

Concordia

Advanced Member
2,647
United States
Massachusetts
Newton
Particulars. I commissioned the piece.

The request regarding the potential donation of the score was made somewhat indirectly ... and there was no implication of time frame. Moreover, the request came at the end of a conversation which was mostly gratitude for my having made the commission. And ... I did not make any commitment.

Perhaps I should give it some time ... and talk to the composer about it.
I think you do have some obligation to preserve the score. That does not include preserving it at any particular library. So keep it as long as it pleases you, and make arrangements to transfer it to a safe place after it no longer does.
 

joshuagb

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
305
United States
Tennessee
Nashville
I'm thinking "dark lounge suit". Don't you hate it when people get "cutesy" with invitations?
"Cocktail attire" is a pretty common and acceptable term for a sort of night-time equivalent to business attire. Really, the only difference here is for women, who would wear a cocktail dress rather than a pant suit or whatever they wear to work. For guys, this usually just means suit and tie. Because of the nature of night events, I'd tend to think you'd have more wiggle room here -- festive pocket square, maybe? Boutonnière?
 

Andy

Site Creator/ Administrator
Staff member
10,871
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Palm Desert
One of the articles linked from the Home Page explains it:

http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/Clothes Articles/cracking_the_dress_code.htm
DAY or EVENING INFORMAL (Don’t think casual!) also COCKTAIL, or BUSINESS ATTIRE: This requires a business suit, necktie, lace-up shoes, and for evening occasions a non-button-down collar dress shirt. Make certain that the person sending out the invitations really means informal and not casual since this is a common misconception!

 

TMMKC

Honors Member
3,270
United States
Missouri
Kansas City
Varies by location and time of year, but normally this is jacket and tie, of the sort you might not use for business. So, a blazer, sport jacket, or suit designed for evening. This is one occasion where women don't calibrate their dress based on what the men are wearing, but rather, the other way around. Figure that the ladies will wear something silky with a bit more than the usual jewelry. Complement that.

Not black tie.

Agree...sometimes a suit, usually a blazer or sport jacket.
 

DougNZ

Advanced Member
2,312
New Zealand
Hawkes Bay
Hastings
Agree...sometimes a suit, usually a blazer or sport jacket.
I disagree.

If the event warrants an invitation that reads 'cocktail dress' or similar, it means suit and tie. If a friend has invited you around for drinks or cocktails, then a jacket would be fine and a suit would probably be overdoing it.