katon

Super Member
1,094
Christmas Island
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N/A
Stumbled across some nice Brooks ads from the 1940s, thought I'd share them here. I get the impression that Brooks didn't quite understand what it had with the Ivy League style yet... Interesting anyhow, though.


(1940)

Lots of Ivy League staples there, but still advertised for playing tennis.


(1940)

Madras shirts... for the beach. Interesting that their buttondowns are apparently made of a cotton cheviot from Scotland... Can anyone help shed some light on the difference between a cheviot weave and an oxford weave?


(1940)

Classic natural shoulder jacket.


(1940)

Hawaiian shirts... Trad? :icon_smile_big:


(1940)

The model here seems to have some waist suppression... I didn't realize they'd made a waist suppressed suit before the No. 2 in the early 1960s... Note the collar pin. :)


(1940)

This ad seems to suggest that Brooks was at least aware that something was happening on campus...


(1940)

"Anonymous but unanimous"... I like that. :)


(1940)

Anglo-inspired waist-suppressed double breasted, featured with derby bowler and dress gloves, for maximum effect. :)


(1941)

Is that a green buttondown? I suspect the matching tie was due to the expense involved in printing color ads...


(1941)


(1941)

Uruguayan rope-soled espadrilles? That's a sharp-looking bathrobe, though.


(1941)


(1942)

Brooks acknowledged the war, but it didn't seem to drain off their customer base to quite the same extent as the Ivy-based clothiers.


(1942)

Note the early use of rayon.


(1943)


(1943)


(1943)

Pink OCBDs for the summer. :)


(1943)

Spring overcoats. :(


(1943)

Silk surcingle belts! Does anyone make these anymore?


(1943)

Wool bow ties! Anyone making them this fall?



(1944)


(1944)

More (most likely uncomfortably hot) spring overcoats!


(1945)


(1945)


(1946)


(1946)


(1946)


(1946)


(1947)

So before they used slubby short-staple cotton???


(1948)

Note the cordovan. :)


(1948)

Paisley!


(1948)

Apparently J. Press wasn't the only one doing double-breasted seersucker... surprising they'd still be pushing the old Anglo suppressed double breasted this late in the game. Was Brooks the first to do tan seersucker?


(1949)

Apparently "Crash Linen" just meant undyed natural linen before J. Press latched on to the term?

The things one learns! :)
 
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The Rambler

Honors Member
4,726
That was fun! I want that worsted gab summer suit with the patch pockets. I think much of the stuff looks unabashedly English, though with a softer shoulder: the little squib on having the best of both worlds, British fabrics and American make is interesting, coming as it does on the eve of WW2. I wonder if postwar catalogues, maybe 1950 or so, strike a different, less English note?
 

Brooksfan

Super Member
1,567
United States
Illinois
Arlington Heights
Interesting to note the many variations in jacket style including 2 and 3 button and single and double breasted. Apparently the 3r2 sack never was the only viable option.
 

C. Sharp

Super Member
1,121
United States
NY
Johnson City
From the 1950 Coronet article on Brooks.
Brooks rewards this loyalty with an equally unswerving devotion to the tradition which has made the establishment an institution. In two of its stores, suits are still piled on long tables as they were in all clothing stores a half-century ago. By far the best individual seller is still the “No. 1 sack suit,” a straight-hanging model with no padding in the shoulders or stiffening in the lapels. The style hasn’t changed in more than 40 years.

Brooks firmly believes that the old is as new as tomorrow, providing it is correct. Tyrone Power, the film star, found this out when he was preparing for his role in The Razor’s Edge. He dropped in to see Mr. Brooks and asked if the store had some photographs which would give his studio’s tailors an idea of what the correctly dressed man wore in 1914. Mr. Brooks showed him a picture on the office wall of Yale University’s famed Whiffenpoof singing club, taken about that time. Power was delighted; the clothes were just what he needed.
“All right, young man,” Mr. Brooks told the actor as he led him to the door. “Take the elevator to the second floor, see one of our salesmen there, and buy our No. 1 sack suit. That’s what all of us have on in that picture, and it’s still sold at Brooks.”
 

dwebber18

Super Member
1,554
United States
Colorado
Denver
We really do need a time machine so we can go back and load up on all that great stuff. I'm sure being a big, tall guy I'd still be out of luck. My dad had to always order his shoes and he only wears a 12
 

C. Sharp

Super Member
1,121
United States
NY
Johnson City
I wanted to touch on something you mentioned in this post http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?107258-J.-Press-in-1959 in relation to your current post. You asked about "English Kerchief Bordered Madder Print Silks. Crepe Lined" - "Kerchief Bordered"? ---The tie in question is on the bottom left. I have seen these. I would have you look at the silk Bandanna scan from 1946. Imagine a tie that is solid colored at the tip, then has a border followed by the design. It would look very much like the Bandanna in the front.

Modern source for silk belts http://www.bowties.com/index.cfm/p/products/range/106/cat/346/subcat/0.htm

Drakes still makes Challis bow ties http://shoponline.drakes-london.com/zoomx-146-86-806-17-Bow Ties-Printed wool challis bow tie.aspx
 

katon

Super Member
1,094
Christmas Island
N/A
N/A
Thanks, C. Sharp!

A few extra images from 1942:


(1942)


(1942)

"Snake hook buckle"... that's a new term to me. Any ideas?


(1942)


(1942)