rhz

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
217
United States
California
Oakland
Hi.

i recently ordered a "slim-fit" suit separates jacket and matching pants at an extremely attractive price. The jacket fits very well, While the fit well in the waist (even a little snug), the pants are very, very baggy through the leg--not at all like the slim fit I'm looking for. I've attached some photos. The pants balloon out from my waist. In the photo where one leg is slimmer than the other, I am easily grabbing 5-6 inches of excess fabric in the back. These pants would need to be trimmed down from the waist to the ankle. I imagine that there are limits as to how much they can be slimmed down. What are those limits? I also wonder whether the cost would be prohibitive. I'd appreciate any advice.

Thank you,

rhz

pants3.jpeg
pants2.jpeg
pants1.jpeg
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
14,484
United States
Illinois
Chicago
It can certainly be trimmed down by an experienced alterations tailor.

It’s a bit difficult to offer an assessment online as we are trying to judge a three dimensional process using a two dimensional image.

It’s hard for me to tell what’s going on through the seat and thighs. The legs (knee down) can certainly be tapered and the slacks hemmed to a proper length. The thighs too can be tapered.

As for cost, it depends on who you use. Is it cost effective? That’s for you to determine.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
7,909
United States
New York
NY
Everything he ⇧ said, plus roll or pin the bottoms up until you have a small or no break (to the length that you normally wear your pants) as that will give you a better read on how "blousey" they really are / how they drape / how much "excess" material you have.
 
Last edited:

Searching_Best_Fit

Senior Member
966
Canada
Ontario
Mississauga
From the pictures it seems that there are two areas to be altered:

* waist
* trousers legs width

And IMHO they should be done in this sequence because you need to first fix the waist before you check the trouser legs width. Hemming should be done last once those two are fixed.

Before we talk about how much to reduce the waist, let's first talk about how you should wear your trousers. o_O From your side picture it seems that the front of your trousers sits very low compared with that at the back. I wonder if there is too much space below your crotch. If so, you should hike up your trousers so that the clothes gently touch your underpants, but not too tight. Wearing trouser low is not a good look, and it disturbs its balance.

After you settle in how the waist of the trousers is located on your body, clinch the waist band at the center back seam to check how much excess on the waist you can take in. The waist can be taken in from the center back seam, probably 2" to 3" at most. While doing so, you can take in the seat a bit along the center back seam. There is another way to take in from the side seam, but that involves removing and attaching pockets and shortening waist bands so that is not recommended.

Remember, tightness is never good for you so the key here is that the front pockets should never flare and the back pockets should never touch. Furthermore, there should be two belt loops near the center back seam. Those two loops should never touch. You probably also want to leave a tiny bit slack here for some full lunches that you are going to have in the future.

Once done so, can you determine how much waist can be taken in? If the above conditions are met, you can ask an alternation tailor to taken in that much from that seam, and that should not cost you too much because this is a simple alteration.

Once the waist is done, we can talk about how much taper you need at the trouser legs. First, you need to determine how the trousers drape on your legs. Roll up the hem by 6" to 8" and put it on so that your ankle is shown. The reason of doing so is that the legs can be draped freely without spooling near the ankle. The ideal case is that you should have two vertical, uninterrupted lines, front and back, per leg starting from hip to ankle. Now, pinch the fabric on both out and inseams to see how much you can taken in *before* the said vertical lines are interrupted. I.E. there should be no ripples, clinching or horizontal ripples. The front vertical lines should divide your knee caps vertically in half, and the line should lies in center. if it is on the inside or outside, there are more serious issue about legs twisting that needs to be fixed. Hopefully that does not happen to you.

Looking at your picture again and see how the leg openings is related to your foot size, I would fancy a guess that it is not too bad even without alteration. However, if you are looking for slimmer silhouette, that is fine, as long as the two vertical lines are still there. But then if you choose to go that route, you should also check by putting on shoes to see if the shoe will look too long that makes it looks like you are wearing clown's shoes. That is totally up to you to decide.

Oh, tapering pants from thigh down should not be too expensive either because it involves sewing two straight seams per leg and cutting off existing seam. if trimming is required, there could be extra charges whether pinking or serging seam allowance is done.

And lastly, you need to hem your trousers, with or without cuff, and with or without break. This is purely based on your own preference so there is not right or wrong answer.

Each of these alteration should not cost you more than $50 each, but I have reservation about the living cost in the bay area so check around.

Those are the two areas I think you will need alteration. You have to hem your trousers no matter what, but that should be done last. There could be more when you dig further, but I think after you have checked and done these three areas the trousers should be fitted to your liking in reasonable shape.

Hope this is helpful to you.
 

rhz

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
217
United States
California
Oakland
From the pictures it seems that there are two areas to be altered:

* waist
* trousers legs width

And IMHO they should be done in this sequence because you need to first fix the waist before you check the trouser legs width. Hemming should be done last once those two are fixed.

Before we talk about how much to reduce the waist, let's first talk about how you should wear your trousers. o_O From your side picture it seems that the front of your trousers sits very low compared with that at the back. I wonder if there is too much space below your crotch. If so, you should hike up your trousers so that the clothes gently touch your underpants, but not too tight. Wearing trouser low is not a good look, and it disturbs its balance.

After you settle in how the waist of the trousers is located on your body, clinch the waist band at the center back seam to check how much excess on the waist you can take in. The waist can be taken in from the center back seam, probably 2" to 3" at most. While doing so, you can take in the seat a bit along the center back seam. There is another way to take in from the side seam, but that involves removing and attaching pockets and shortening waist bands so that is not recommended.

Remember, tightness is never good for you so the key here is that the front pockets should never flare and the back pockets should never touch. Furthermore, there should be two belt loops near the center back seam. Those two loops should never touch. You probably also want to leave a tiny bit slack here for some full lunches that you are going to have in the future.

Once done so, can you determine how much waist can be taken in? If the above conditions are met, you can ask an alternation tailor to taken in that much from that seam, and that should not cost you too much because this is a simple alteration.

Once the waist is done, we can talk about how much taper you need at the trouser legs. First, you need to determine how the trousers drape on your legs. Roll up the hem by 6" to 8" and put it on so that your ankle is shown. The reason of doing so is that the legs can be draped freely without spooling near the ankle. The ideal case is that you should have two vertical, uninterrupted lines, front and back, per leg starting from hip to ankle. Now, pinch the fabric on both out and inseams to see how much you can taken in *before* the said vertical lines are interrupted. I.E. there should be no ripples, clinching or horizontal ripples. The front vertical lines should divide your knee caps vertically in half, and the line should lies in center. if it is on the inside or outside, there are more serious issue about legs twisting that needs to be fixed. Hopefully that does not happen to you.

Looking at your picture again and see how the leg openings is related to your foot size, I would fancy a guess that it is not too bad even without alteration. However, if you are looking for slimmer silhouette, that is fine, as long as the two vertical lines are still there. But then if you choose to go that route, you should also check by putting on shoes to see if the shoe will look too long that makes it looks like you are wearing clown's shoes. That is totally up to you to decide.

Oh, tapering pants from thigh down should not be too expensive either because it involves sewing two straight seams per leg and cutting off existing seam. if trimming is required, there could be extra charges whether pinking or serging seam allowance is done.

And lastly, you need to hem your trousers, with or without cuff, and with or without break. This is purely based on your own preference so there is not right or wrong answer.

Each of these alteration should not cost you more than $50 each, but I have reservation about the living cost in the bay area so check around.

Those are the two areas I think you will need alteration. You have to hem your trousers no matter what, but that should be done last. There could be more when you dig further, but I think after you have checked and done these three areas the trousers should be fitted to your liking in reasonable shape.

Hope this is helpful to you.
This is extremely helpful. Thank you so much. There's quite a bit here to consider. Beginning with how these pants sit on the waist, I agree that it looks awkward. If I hike them up to where you suggest, they come to my belly button, which is much higher than I am accustomed to wearing pants.

I've also found previously, that it is very difficult to get pants to remain at that height, since, despite being slim, I have an unfortunate layer of belly fat around my navel, causing a 1 to 1.5 inch difference in circumference around the navel vs lower on the waist (where I wear casual pants) . This together with gravity causes things to slide down. These pants are offered in a lower rise as well, which could reduce the slipping problem by having the pants sit lower. However, if a lower rise is unflattering, perhaps that's not a good idea.

In any case, when I have the pants at the height you recommend, there is no excess fabric in the waist--less than 1/2".

I have added new photos with the pant legs rolled up. The lines in front and back are quite vertical. I am able to pinch off 1.5-2" of fabric on the outseam just below the end on the front pocket entrance without disrupting the lines.

These pants actually cost less than $50 on sale. I'd like to make them work, but if the alterations are more than $100, I'm not sure if it makes sense.

Thanks again for your great comments! Very helpful. I'd appreciate any further feedback in light of the new photos (as well as the rise question).

Cheers,

rhz


pant3-1.jpeg
pants3-2.jpeg
 

Searching_Best_Fit

Senior Member
966
Canada
Ontario
Mississauga
Ah, much better!! What a difference simply by wearing the trousers correctly!! Some problem just corrects itself without any fixes.

I will not comment, nor suggest, how you should wear your trousers. I simply raise the point of how it should be done. Yes, with belts and the body, trousers do slide down from time to time. You can choose to go with suspenders (braces) or wear your belts a bit tighter. The belts is not just there to decorate the pants, it should hold the trousers tight in its correct place.

Now, it seems that the seat (hip) of the trousers is too large on you while the waist seems ok. I am perplexed by the curvature on the sides of your hips until I realized that you have a flat seat rears (small glutes). I think there can be taken in from center back seam of the trouser, but check with the alteration tailor first about how much can be done.

I think once that problem is resolve, there should be less to worry about the trouser legs. Again, IMHO the openings are fine w.r.t. your foot/shoe size. It is possible to go narrower, but I think that is fine as is.

I once had the waist taken in and a little bit of seat on a pair of trouser. That costs me about $15 or so. Legs tapered was $10 or $15 while hemming is at $12. So in my locale to do all three it should be about $50 or so before tax. I don't know what it will be like at your area, but at least you know what you want to do and can ask intelligent questions to get a better picture.

One last thing about the alteration cost: the cost of the garment does not reflect proportionally to the cost of alteration. If I thrift a jacket at goodwill for $5 dollars, should I expect the alteration cost of shortening sleeve to be free? No, that is unreasonable. For alteration cost you are paying the time, skills and efforts of an alteration tailor, not the cost of your garment. Let me clarify this first.
 

rhz

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
217
United States
California
Oakland
Thanks again. I completely agree with your comments regarding cost. As for the pants themselves, they are actually a little snug/form-fitting in the seat. The only issue is how the balloon out along the leg. I'll take them to a tailor today to see what he has to say.
 

rhz

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
217
United States
California
Oakland
The tailor advised me to return the pants. He said that this ballooning in the hips was something he had only seen in ladies trousers. Extensive alterations would be required.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
3,111
United States
California
San Francisco
The tailor advised me to return the pants. He said that this ballooning in the hips was something he had only seen in ladies trousers. Extensive alterations would be required.
Are you still fussing over those trousers? I thought you were going to return them, inasmuch as you are going to convert the jacket into a blazer. Or are you still undecided about whether to do that?

If you do the conversion, tan and/or medium gray trousers will do you more good than navy blue ones.
 

Searching_Best_Fit

Senior Member
966
Canada
Ontario
Mississauga
The tailor advised me to return the pants. He said that this ballooning in the hips was something he had only seen in ladies trousers. Extensive alterations would be required.
That is too bad. Return the pants.

Well, on the positive side, at least you learned something from it. Should have better luck for the next pair.
 
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