Sufferable Fob

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
402
Well, I feel the umbrella is slightly more proper than throwing my coat over the lady - that might mess up her hair !


I bought a ridiculously large umbrella and I use it to meet new people. Of course, I tend to only meet the kind of people that don't remember umbrellas on rainy days - but they've seemed nice so far.
 

Hanzo

Super Member
1,163
United States
California
San Diego
While we're on the topic, any recommendations for GOOD umbrellas? I saw a few very nice ones while overseas, but as you can no longer take them on the plane, that didn't do me much good.
 

nicksull

Super Member
1,060
Just found an interesting note in William Sangsters Umbrellas and their History (first publisherd in 1871) (reprint by Dodo Press www.dodopress.co.uk) to the effect that "in Germany a solider is or used to be - strictly forbidden from carrying an open umbrella unless accompanied by a civilian or lady". Elsewhere in this interesting tome there are suggestions that the use of umbrellas was considered less than manly.
 

ToryBoy

Advanced Member
2,694
I read an article or a post on a forum that technically, a "gentleman" should not use umbrellas. They should stay wrapped, carried by either the hand grabbing the midpoint of the umbrella or using it as a "walking stick".

Sam
Clearly that person does not live in Britain or even Seattle. When I used to use public transport to travel to work, I always had a mini Fulton in my bag just in case it rained.


Oops, I carry mine with handle at the front
 

flatline

Senior Member
647
Oops, I carry mine with handle at the front
Agree. I don't know why one would carry it point-forward. I generally carry it in my off-hand (left), with the point facing down/back. If I need to open it (how churlish of me!), I grasp the handle with mine right hand and use my left to commit the heretical act.
 

Cardcaptor Charlie

Inactive user
1,525
Agree. I don't know why one would carry it point-forward. I generally carry it in my off-hand (left), with the point facing down/back. If I need to open it (how churlish of me!), I grasp the handle with mine right hand and use my left to commit the heretical act.
You carry it with the ferrule end pointing forward to avoid jabbing the person at the back with it. It is common-sense really.
 

flatline

Senior Member
647
You carry it with the ferrule end pointing forward to avoid jabbing the person at the back with it. It is common-sense really.
I understand your point, but I think the person behind me needs to be aware of their environment. To my mind, I am more to blame if I somehow skewer the fellow in front of me than behind.
 

Will

Honors Member
3,983
United States
Ca
San francisco
The point forward umbrella carry came from the way a sheathed sword was carried when it was not attached to a belt or sash. Both the British and American armies had the same rule, at least through the American Civil war if not later as re-enactors still carry their swords this way today.

You may choose to do it differently but it's nice to know where these things came from IMO.
 

ToryBoy

Advanced Member
2,694
The point forward umbrella carry came from the way a sheathed sword was carried when it was not attached to a belt or sash. Both the British and American armies had the same rule, at least through the American Civil war if not later as re-enactors still carry their swords this way today.

You may choose to do it differently but it's nice to know where these things came from IMO.
Then surely an umbrella must be carried in the right hand and all vehicles should be right hand-drive; however, you Yanks drive on the 'wrong' side :icon_smile_wink:
 

flatline

Senior Member
647
The point forward umbrella carry came from the way a sheathed sword was carried when it was not attached to a belt or sash. Both the British and American armies had the same rule, at least through the American Civil war if not later as re-enactors still carry their swords this way today.

You may choose to do it differently but it's nice to know where these things came from IMO.
I don't understand. If I carried a sword in its sheath point forward, what's to stop it sliding out and clattering to the ground? My umbrella isn't carried vertical, but it is certainly held at enough of a cant - even the picture on your website appears to be held at enough of an angle for a well oiled sword to give one the slip.

Edit - Obviously I might need to do a bit more reading on military history, but this is the exact reasoning I was using to carry an umbrella pointy-side down. :teacha:
 
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