SG_67

Connoisseur
15,000
United States
Illinois
Chicago
The flagship store on Madison Ave carries, and still carries, Alden. The only department store I know of that does.

I always liked Barney’s. I hope they decide to reopen in chicago. The most boutique like of any department store and great service. They carry some really wonderful brands in men’s clothing.

I’ll miss cocktails at Fred’s too.
 

Cassadine

Super Member
1,273
United States
Pennsylvania
Butler
The funny thing about Barney's is - in men's anyway - it covered a wide spectrum from the avant garde - like those boots - to many items that could have come out of Brooks in its day or Paul Stuart today.

On sale (that store had insane retail prices, but also, great markdowns), I bought shirts, ties, shoes, sweaters and, even, suits from it over the years that all fit nicely in my trad wardrobe. But to emphasize, I had to pick and choose carefully as plenty of outré stuff lined the shelves too.
I think that might've contributed to this sad episode in its life--- I thought Barney's--tried to be all things to all customers. That's an impossible business model unless your Amazon.

I hope Barney's can get it together and get a grip on reality. I loved going there when I was a young man in Jersey; couldn't afford the merch, but it fed my dreams.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,978
United States
New York
NY
I think that might've contributed to this sad episode in its life--- I thought Barney's--tried to be all things to all customers. That's an impossible business model unless your Amazon.

I hope Barney's can get it together and get a grip on reality. I loved going there when I was a young man in Jersey; couldn't afford the merch, but it fed my dreams.

When I was a kid growing up in New Jersey in the '70s, NYC seemed very far away in spirit if not miles. I remember Barney's advertising as a discount chain. When I started working in '80s, it was still, primarily a discount / warehouse type of store (that I frequented), but - in my memory - that changed in the '90s sometime when it went from discount to high end in a flash.

This short article pretty much aligns with my memory:

 

FLMike

Connoisseur
5,797
United States
FL
West Coast
I gave a pair to FLMIKE. He wears them with his pleated shorts and Gators hoodie in the early Fall.
I’d wear them every day for a month before I wore a Gators hoodie for a day. And Gators wear jorts, not shorts. Just Google “Gator jorts” and you’ll get the picture.
 

At Law

Senior Member
615
United States
Nebraska
Omaha
I’d wear them every day for a month before I wore a Gators hoodie for a day. And Gators wear jorts, not shorts. Just Google “Gator jorts” and you’ll get the picture.
Identical to Husker fans and their fearless red neck leader, Scott Frost.
Up here, Husker fans prefer camo, flip flops, hoodies, tshirts, long cargo shorts, spiked hair/buzz cuts/bald, etc.
And that's what they wear to work at the new car dealership.
 

Cassadine

Super Member
1,273
United States
Pennsylvania
Butler
When I was a kid growing up in New Jersey in the '70s, NYC seemed very far away in spirit if not miles. I remember Barney's advertising as a discount chain. When I started working in '80s, it was still, primarily a discount / warehouse type of store (that I frequented), but - in my memory - that changed in the '90s sometime when it went from discount to high end in a flash.

This short article pretty much aligns with my memory:

My recollection is different. I never went there until the late 70's--the Carter years. Manhattan was definitely a cesspool at the time--Times Square was more like Sodom and Gommorah then. A few years ago my kids went on their respective 8th grade class trips there! Giuliani really scrubbed the place.

I recall Barneys as being pretty high end, but then again, maybe it just appeared so glitzy to a blue-collar kid; I'm from Garfield--a factory town back then. I thought the open air malls in Paramus were amazing--especially at Christmas. Didn't one of those have a talking Santa, or something to that effect? It's also possible I'm thinking of Berdorf-Goodman, too. I know I went there, too.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,978
United States
New York
NY
My recollection is different. I never went there until the late 70's--the Carter years. Manhattan was definitely a cesspool at the time--Times Square was more like Sodom and Gommorah then. A few years ago my kids went on their respective 8th grade class trips there! Giuliani really scrubbed the place.

I recall Barneys as being pretty high end, but then again, maybe it just appeared so glitzy to a blue-collar kid; I'm from Garfield--a factory town back then. I thought the open air malls in Paramus were amazing--especially at Christmas. Didn't one of those have a talking Santa, or something to that effect? It's also possible I'm thinking of Berdorf-Goodman, too. I know I went there, too.
Not unlike you, I grew up in New Brunswick, NJ - a beat up town if ever - and while, back then, I recognized that NYC was crime, drug and sex-for-sale ridden, as you couldn't not see those things, it still had an Oz-like attraction to me as it was so much more alive - so much more everything - than the sad, broken town I came from.

My entire focus as a kid was getting an education, getting the hell out and getting to NYC and I did that as fast as was humanly possible. As to Barney's, I have a '80s' memory of going a few times with some work buddies to a huge old warehouse store in the, then, ramshackle Chelsea area of NYC and going through racks and racks of suits jammed together to find a good value.

That's it; that's my memory until, somewhere in the '90s, Barney's opened up a fancy Madison area store that was way beyond my budget. A store called Moe Ginsburg tried a similar transition - from warehouse to upscale - but flamed out quickly in its upscale effort. Prior, though, it - like the old Barney's - was an outstanding warehouse store.
 

Cassadine

Super Member
1,273
United States
Pennsylvania
Butler
Not unlike you, I grew up in New Brunswick, NJ - a beat up town if ever - and while, back then, I recognized that NYC was crime, drug and sex-for-sale ridden, as you couldn't not see those things, it still had an Oz-like attraction to me as it was so much more alive - so much more everything - than the sad, broken town I came from.

My entire focus as a kid was getting an education, getting the hell out and getting to NYC and I did that as fast as was humanly possible. As to Barney's, I have a '80s' memory of going a few times with some work buddies to a huge old warehouse store in the, then, ramshackle Chelsea area of NYC and going through racks and racks of suits jammed together to find a good value.

That's it; that's my memory until, somewhere in the '90s, Barney's opened up a fancy Madison area store that was way beyond my budget. A store called Moe Ginsburg tried a similar transition - from warehouse to upscale - but flamed out quickly in its upscale effort. Prior, though, it - like the old Barney's - was an outstanding warehouse store.
Yepper. Manhattan just had that panache to it--or at least it appeared that way to kids such as ourselves.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,978
United States
New York
NY
No, it really did have that panache, oodles and oodles of that panache, and many, many other things I have been advised not to go into on family-friendly forums such as this.

Then killjoy Rudy finished it all off...

Lucky to have caught the last gasps of it in the 1990s on week-enders up from DC or down from Providence - the difference in just the few years from '94-'97 was palpable - much less the difference from 1990 which was an entirely different city IMHO.

I knew it was gone for good when in May of 2000, I saw fleets of tour buses disgorging wave after wave of tourists from the corn-belt come to The Big Apple to storm Disney and Pizza-Hut with grim determination.



Well and poignantly stated.

Do you by any chance happen to recall the name of that 24 hr French-ish bistro near Flatiron where you could have an O.K. steak au poivre at 3 AM served by some aspiring model-actress-dancer or other?

Sort of like what the old Au Pied du Cochon in Georgetown was only better - not that that was hard or anything.

Been trying to remeber the name for some time now...
I don't think these are the one you are thinking of, but the two that come to mind are Les Halles (which closed recently) and L'Express (which I think is too new). I have a vague recollection of the one I think you mean, but can't get the name in my head.