broadcloth vs. pinpoint redux

LordSmoke

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All the posts I found were old, so perhaps a current one might be useful or ignored and soon forgotten.

I usually keep a couple white and blue dress shirts from PF (or JAB) in my closet as I try to expand into nicer ones. Whenever I order, I am always faced with the question of "broadcloth" or "pinpoint", the latter seeming to be more commonly available. So, I adjusted my last order so that I have one of each in white and blue.

Honestly, I can sense there is some difference in the fabrics of the white shirts, but that's about it. Seems more apparent in the blue with the pinpoint being more physically textured and visually uniform and the broadcloth being smoother, but more visually textured.

Question: do I or should I care about broadcloth v. pinpoint? Why or why not? Is one or the other preferred for certain applications or times of year or something?
 

CLTesquire

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Broadcloth is generally a little thinner and a little cooler wearing than pinpoint. Of course it's also harder to iron and is more prone to wrinkling.
 

Audi S5 TC

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Broadcloth is generally a little thinner and a little cooler wearing than pinpoint. Of course it's also harder to iron and is more prone to wrinkling.
The reasons why I like twill the most for a dress shirt, as long as it is a fine twill (like my white solid Michael Kors French cuff dress shirt) is because it is completely not transparent, the easiest to iron and the most resistant to wrinkles.

The complete absence of transparency with a twill shirt comes in handy with and without an undershirt (more so in the latter circumstance; I'm always in the former circumstance).

Honestly, a fine twill dress shirt like my white solid Michael Kors French cuff (which is non iron 100% cotton) is just as cool, dressy, formal, silky, smooth and soft as any broadcloth, pinpoint or poplin dress shirt. However, Imperial twill dress shirts are less dressy, formal, silky, smooth and soft but warmer than broadcloth, pinpoint and poplin but just as easy to iron, just as far from transparent, just as resistant to wrinkles as fine twill. And, fine twill is just as cool as it is warm.
 
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ilikeyourstyle

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Fully agree with Audi above. I don't even bother with super-thin/super-smooth shirts, as I can't be bothered with the wrinkles. I'd rather not look like I forgot to iron. Tywrhitt's subtle twill weaves typically work great for me. Their poplins from the past were just frustrating for someone who tries not to look like he slept in his shirt.
 

momsdoc

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Yes, the CT poplins needed more ironing upkeep. That was a good trade off compared to the current overwhelming predominance of no irons they have moved to.
 

LordSmoke

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Thanks for the input, guys.

Twill!? Ack, another choice. My next "nicer" shirts will be in pink and lavendar from Ratio - and all are available in broadcloth, pinpoint, and twill. I just got an ecru, but it was only available in pinpoint. The choice seems more important for $115-125 shirts vs. $60.

For my current blue and white shirts, let's just say, ahem, that ironing is not an issue.

Audi, Coram! I lived for many years (15 off and on: 1985-2000) in Rocky Point during and just after grad school at SUNY. :hi:
 

LordSmoke

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PS: I might add that I do live in Florida and wear these shirts mostly with 3-piece suits and to a lesser extent blazers/sport coats. So, I suppose warm weather, dressier fabric would be a consideration.
 

Spex

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I find with blue shirts there is a different effect that occurs with pinpoint vs broadcloth. Blue broadcloth shirts tend to be made with blue threads in both directions leading to a consistent texture and color. Pinpoint shirts (being pinpoint "oxford") tend to be made from blue and white threads, creating a certain change in color as the fabric drapes and bends. I find that a blue pinpoint shirt looks a little less formal than a blue broadcloth, assuming they are of the same tone.
 

Matt S

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Yes, the CT poplins needed more ironing upkeep. That was a good trade off compared to the current overwhelming predominance of no irons they have moved to.
I tried a CT poplin shirt and I couldn't iron it! I've never had problems ironing poplin shirts before, but my iron just couldn't remove the wrinkles. I find that there is a big difference between poplins. My Turnbull & Asser poplins iron very easily.