Charles Dana

Honors Member
3,116
United States
California
San Francisco
Eponymous Funk: Don't go for the deal.

You have been forthright in explaining what you like and don't like about the BB polo shirts that are included in the deal. Thanks to your honesty, it is apparent what is happening in your head: the part of your mind that really likes a good sale is at war with the part that knows that some of the shirts in the group are not exactly what you want.

Whether you realize it or not, you are grappling with the same dilemma that has tripped up almost all of us at one time or another: "Will this seemingly great deal result in my obtaining what I like, or am I only getting seduced by a low price? Will I end up asking myself, 'What was I thinking?'"

Guiding principle: Never buy the price; buy the thing itself.

It looks as if you are flirting with a seductive price. If a voice deep inside you is whispering that you don't actually prefer some of the shirts that are in the discounted group, you should listen to it.

If you had the option of selecting ANY seven BB polo shirts for $350.00--and you could afford the money--then slam dunk: I'd say take the deal. However, it's not much of a deal if BB decides (a) which colors you'll have to take as a condition of enjoying the discount, and (b) you know that you don't want some of those colors.

Face the fact: You don't like some of the shirts that the deal would force upon you. And you never will. When it comes to volitional purchases, buy only those items that you know in your heart will, in Marie Kondo's words, "spark joy." And you'll always know--provided you listen to your heart.

Put away the dang calculator. The percentage discount is not dispositive here; the ONLY thing that matters is what you really, really like and don't like. And you don't like this particular deal.

Pass.
 
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SG_67

Connoisseur
14,582
United States
Illinois
Chicago
According to Brooks Brothers, the shirts are $79.50 full-price. They cite the set as a savings of $206.50 over full price (at the risk of doing math in public, that's 37.1% off).

Regards,
Ignore the savings. That’s irrelevant.

I’m not a “performance wear” kind of guy. The idea of dropping $350 on 7 golf shirts doesn’t appeal to me. You’ll end up with 7 shirts of the same style and cut with the only difference being color.

If that appeals to you, then go for it.
 

EponymousFunk

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
148
Washington Beltway
United States
DC
Washington
... the part of your mind that really likes a good sale is at war with the part that knows that some of the shirts in the group are not exactly what you want....
Not exactly. What I wrote was 3 of the 7 'are not Summer colors to my eye', so I'd likely not wear them until Fall. (Looking at it from a different perspective, the seven are well-balanced across three seasons.)

Whether you realize it or not, you are grappling with the same dilemma that has tripped up almost all of us at one time or another: "Will this seemingly great deal result in my obtaining what I like, or am I only getting seduced by a low price? Will I end up asking myself, 'What was I thinking?'"

Guiding principle: Never buy the price; buy the thing itself.
Ref above, I like the colors; there is no hazard (Well, little I suppose--it's possible I will just hate Brooks Brothers' polo shirts. I think not.).

That last bit is good advice and one I, too, have learnt from experience (while still falling victim to it from time to time).

Perhaps it will help to further clarify that I planned to buy a half dozen good cotton polos before knowing about Brooks Brothers' sale (indeed, in anticipation of Fathers' Day sales presenting the opportunity to buy what I intended to buy at a well-reduced cost).

It looks as if you are flirting with a seductive price. If a voice deep inside you is whispering that you don't actually prefer some of the shirts that are in the discounted group, you should listen to it.
Sound advice, sir. The voice likes the shirts, but notes that some will have to wait until Fall to wear. (Or, alternatively: I may anticipate 3 new polos in my Fall wardrobe!)

If you had the option of selecting ANY seven BB polo shirts for $350.00
I do not. Very nearly all the colors are presently in stock in my size at $55.65, so approximately $390 for seven. It hardly seems worth $40 more to select 7 of the 23 colors offered at the reduced price (or as much at $200 more to select from all 31). There are perhaps 4 or 5 other colors I like that are not in the set--these shall be gift suggestions for my wife (which will please her greatly; she says I am a "difficult giftee").

--and you could afford the money
I can; even at full price. But...why ever would I NOT buy (and even plan to buy) something I intend to buy when it is on sale rather than when it is not?

--then slam dunk: I'd say take the deal. However, it's not much of a deal if BB decides (a) which colors you'll have to take as a condition of enjoying the discount, and (b) you know that you don't want some of those colors.
I am perfectly fine with (a) as indicated previously; none of the colors are objectionable to me. Regarding (b): that is simply a false conclusion.

Face the fact: You don't like some of the shirts that the deal would force upon you. And you never will.
Again: this is wrong, sir.

When it comes to volitional purchases, buy only those items that you know in your heart will, in Marie Kondo's words, "spark joy." And you'll always know--provided you listen to your heart.
I can't say much about Mme. Kondo's methods, but will question whether they ought to be applied to something as trivial as this.

I can definitely say no item of my clothing has ever "spark[ed] joy", nor do I expect it to. I've been pleased with a small number of "things" over my lifetime, but not joyful. (I did once have electrically-heated long underwear develop a short--the resulting spark was hardly joyous.)

Put away the dang calculator. The percentage discount is not dispositive here; the ONLY thing that matters is what you really, really like and don't like. And you don't like this particular deal.

Pass.
I'm really not that focused on the money. As previously noted, I could buy these at full price but why would I? Here are 7 colors (of 31 total) that will provide 4 shirts for Spring/Summer wear, 3 for Fall/Winter wear, and save me from having to choose from amongst the 31 colors available (21 of which are on sale and perhaps 12 of which I do like--including the 7 Brooks Brothers has thoughtfully put into the set we are exhaustively discussing).

All I really wanted to know is whether $50 is a good price for the Brooks Brothers cotton polo. It appears to be as good a price as I will see absent a corporate discount (which I do not have).

Thank you for your thoughts and for the lively discussion!

Regards,
 

EponymousFunk

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
148
Washington Beltway
United States
DC
Washington
Ignore the savings. That’s irrelevant.

I’m not a “performance wear” kind of guy. The idea of dropping $350 on 7 golf shirts doesn’t appeal to me. You’ll end up with 7 shirts of the same style and cut with the only difference being color.

If that appeals to you, then go for it.
Oh, dear...I'm not communicating at all well today.

The "performance wear" is what I have outgrown, sir.

The object is to leave behind a shirt rack full of (actual) golf shirts and replace them with cotton polos suited to the wardrobe I desire.

I see nothing wrong with a number of shirts of the same style and cut whose only difference is color--that succinctly describes several groups of dress shirts I wear daily with suits. In fact, I like the idea: 7 shirts that fit well and may be mixed and matched with chinos or odd trousers as occasion dictates.

Thank you for your thoughts!

Regards,
 

EponymousFunk

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
148
Washington Beltway
United States
DC
Washington
Thank you all for your responses.

I have purchased the gift box.

I do not anticipate being disappointed, but it can be returned quite easily if the shirts turn out not to fit well or otherwise present good value at $50 each.

Regards,
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
14,582
United States
Illinois
Chicago
Oh, dear...I'm not communicating at all well today.

The "performance wear" is what I have outgrown, sir.

The object is to leave behind a shirt rack full of (actual) golf shirts and replace them with cotton polos suited to the wardrobe I desire.

I see nothing wrong with a number of shirts of the same style and cut whose only difference is color--that succinctly describes several groups of dress shirts I wear daily with suits. In fact, I like the idea: 7 shirts that fit well and may be mixed and matched with chinos or odd trousers as occasion dictates.

Thank you for your thoughts!

Regards,
In all the back and forth I missed out on that. Re-reading your posts I get your point.

I hope the gift box works out for you. Good luck.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
3,116
United States
California
San Francisco
Not exactly. What I wrote was 3 of the 7 'are not Summer colors to my eye', so I'd likely not wear them until Fall. The voice likes the shirts, but notes that some will have to wait until Fall to wear. (Or, alternatively: I may anticipate 3 new polos in my Fall wardrobe!)
Thank you for the clarification.

Initially you stated that the BB Father's Day gift box "unfortunately" included "only 'fall colors'" and that "summer would be much preferred." Then you stated you "would have preferred the set labeled 'The Prep' for its brighter colors."

I now see that your reservations were due not to the autumn-type colors themselves, but to their inclusion in a boxed set that you were hoping would provide you just with summer colors.

I'm glad that you find none of the colors to be distasteful.

[M]y wife says I am a "difficult giftee."
No! Really?

I can't say much about Mme. Kondo's methods, but will question whether they ought to be applied to something as trivial as this.
Hoo-boy, are you ever in the wrong forum.

I can definitely say no item of my clothing has ever "spark[ed] joy", nor do I expect it to.
Hoo-boy, are you ever in the wrong forum.

I've been pleased with a small number of "things" over my lifetime, but not joyful.
That's too bad. (On second thought, maybe you have the right idea. It's life's intangibles that have lasting value. How about a compromise: allow fine tangible things to give you "joy," but only on the condition that, because they are merely "things," you won't get very worried once they are no longer in your life. Let them give you joy, but keep them in their proper perspective. There are a lot of people whose homes--especially the closets therein--are filled with regrettable purchases because joy was not a factor at the time they were acquired.)

I did once have electrically-heated long underwear develop a short--the resulting spark was hardly joyous.
Not joyous to you perhaps, but the people who witnessed or heard about the event are still laughing about it. I sure got a chuckle reading about it. How did your wife react when you went running down the hall with your ass on fire?

I'm really not that focused on the money.
OK.

All I really wanted to know is whether $50 is a good price for the Brooks Brothers cotton polo.
Didn't you just--oh, never mind.

I need an aspirin. Or three.
 
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EponymousFunk

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
148
Washington Beltway
United States
DC
Washington
... It's life's intangibles that have lasting value. How about a compromise: allow fine tangible things to give you "joy," but only on the condition that, because they are merely "things," you won't get very worried once they are no longer in your life. Let them give you joy, but keep them in their proper perspective....
This. I must say I reserve the term “joy” for time and experience with my wife and our dogs (we have no children). Things may bring some measure of “happy”, but they (and that feeling) are fleeting.

Didn't you just--oh, never mind.

I need an aspirin. Or three.
Would it help if I said my approach to money is to not be wasteful of it? I’m quite willing to spend when it will be well-spent, but mindful to avoid being “penny wise and pound foolish”.

Regards,
 
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Charles Dana

Honors Member
3,116
United States
California
San Francisco
I must say I reserve the term “joy” for time and experience with my wife and our dogs (we have no children). Things may bring some measure of “happy”, but they (and that feeling) are fleeting.
Fair enough. Although if you ever try Swiss underwear (and not the kind that you plug in), you might be willing to make an exception about not using the word "joy" in conjunction with clothes.

And don't get me started on the splendors of Demeyere cookware. (Cookware, not underwear.)

Would it help if I said my approach to money is to not be wasteful of it? I’m quite willing to spend when it will be well-spent, but mindful to avoid being “penny wise and pound foolish”.
I can live with that.
 
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