Flanderian

Connoisseur
22,484
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
I appreciate the compliment, but I knew all but nothing about clothing style, history, classics, etc. in college - and had no money anyway.

That said, I had some instinctual lean, as my pants were one pair of 501s, one pair of chinos and a few grey dress trousers (for work), a pair of boat shoes (sun, rain, sleet, snow - I wore the boat shoes) and Chuck Taylors, one ragg wool sweater, one grey sweat shirt and a few OCBDs (Arrow Dover if memory serves) a pair (sadly) of Tom Mccann dress shoes (work again) and a few genetic ties that I don't even remember anything about.

A few other items - jean jacket, navy sport coat (work again), copy cat (cheap) Mighty Mac - and that got me through four years of school and work. I could move my entire wardrobe in one medium sized tote with a few items slung over my arm.

By the end of four years, they where all well worn. The boat shoes all but disintegrated - no kidding.
In the mid '60's, my sartorial fun while attending school was very limited. I recall wanting and purchasing a pair of traditional Wellington style black leather boots. (Who needs food, right!?) Ties of the era, in addition to being about 1 1/2" were quite conservative, as was main stream taste. The tie brand Rooster had long been known for their square ended wool and mohair ties, which were a staple of Ivy casual wear. In the mid '60's they introduced a model they called Ruffler, which were novelty printed cotton ties.

The weird thing was that they were actually rather smart in a wink and nod sort of way, and could look rather good with a solid sport jacket, or seersucker or tan poplin suit.


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Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,989
United States
New York
NY
In the mid '60's, my sartorial fun while attending school was very limited. I recall wanting and purchasing a pair of traditional black leather boots. (Who needs food, right!?) Ties of the era, in addition to being about 1 1/2" were quite conservative, as was main stream taste. The tie brand Rooster had long been known for their square ended wool and mohair ties, which were a staple of Ivy casual wear. In the mid '60's they introduced a model they called Ruffler, which were novelty printed cotton ties.

They weird thing was that they were actually rather smart in a wink and nod sort of way, and could look rather good with a solid sport jacket, or seersucker or tan poplin suit.


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⇧ Are those your ties from back then? If so, it's fantastic that you still have them. Even if not, cool ties.

Not in college that I remember, where I made it through with about four ties (pretty sure one was a knockoff of the classic burgundy and navy striped one), but I definitely bought Rooster ties - the squared-off knit ones - when I started to learn about Ivy style post college.

In the '80s, living in NYC, I can remember wearing jeans, an OCBD, a Shetland, a Rooster knit tie, a herringbone tweed sport coat and desert boots as my "sporty" going out to a bar or casual restaurant outfit (my riff on Redford's outfit in "Three Days of the Condor," without the Redford good looks).
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
30,947
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
I appreciate the compliment, but I knew all but nothing about clothing style, history, classics, etc. in college - and had no money anyway.

That said, I had some instinctual lean, as my pants were one pair of 501s, one pair of chinos and a few grey dress trousers (for work), a pair of boat shoes (sun, rain, sleet, snow - I wore the boat shoes) and Chuck Taylors, one ragg wool sweater, one grey sweat shirt and a few OCBDs (Arrow Dover if memory serves) a pair (sadly) of Tom Mccann dress shoes (work again) and a few genetic ties that I don't even remember anything about.

A few other items - jean jacket, navy sport coat (work again), copy cat (cheap) Mighty Mac - and that got me through four years of school and work. I could move my entire wardrobe in one medium sized tote with a few items slung over my arm.

By the end of four years, they where all well worn. The boat shoes all but disintegrated - no kidding.
I remember going off to my first USAF assignment after graduating and earning my commission. Virtually everything I owned (not just my clothes) easily fit into the trunk and back seat of a Dodge Challenger. That sort of explains the extent of my wardrobing options while in college. LOL ;)
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
30,947
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
Yeah, that cardigan is totally out of it. Does anyone wear letterman's sweaters or jackets anymore? Not having any relatives that age to ask I put it out to the forum.
Who herein could still fit into their high school letterman's jacket? I casnnot claim to be one bold enough to claim to still be able to do that. :( LOL.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,989
United States
New York
NY
I remember going off to my first USAF assignment after graduating and earning my commission. Virtually everything I owned (not just my clothes) easily fit into the trunk and back seat of a Dodge Challenger. That sort of explains the extent of my wardrobing options while in college. LOL ;)
I moved once during college and literally walked everything (it was just to the other side of the street) from the old to the new apartment (lived off campus, but year round) in two, maybe, three trips. Both apartments were "furnished" (sure, technically true), so other than a small chest of draws and a folding table, it was all clothes, books and a few other things - but still, all in only two or three trips by me alone. Owner of the house (it was an attic apt) of the new place did carry the chest of draws for me.

Who herein could still fit into their high school letterman's jacket? I casnnot claim to be one bold enough to claim to still be able to do that. :( LOL.
I have been the same size and wieght since reaching adulthood (6'1", 150lb - height is down half an inch, but I'm cheating and rounding up). That said, 1. I'm kinda designed that way, 2. I work out, at least, twice as much as I did twenty years ago and 3. I eat less than half than I did back then as well.

Since I have none of my college clothes (they were quite ready to retire as soon as I finished), my oldest clothing is from the late '80s and it all fits, but is actually large as it was cut that way back then. I have a BB Tweed Herringbone sport coat from the late '80s that fits that description that I've been debating (for a few years now) having "cut down" to less "big" proportions as I don't wear it anymore as it looks silly (thinks one of the guys from "Friends").
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,989
United States
New York
NY
Staying with "big" overcoats. Anyway ever heard of Stoneface fabrics?

The way this ad reads reminds me of the way cars used to be made where the manufacture, say, Cadillac would build out the chassis (with all the mechanical parts, engine, etc. in) and then turn it over to a "body" shop to build out the, well, "body" (the exterior design pieces and place were everyone sits - also called the "carriage," a term carried over from the horse-and-buggy days) to be completed.

You'll see old ads that read: "Cadillac, body by Fisher."
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Flanderian

Connoisseur
22,484
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
⇧ Are those your ties from back then? If so, it's fantastic that you still have them. Even if not, cool ties.

Not in college that I remember, where I made it through with about four ties (pretty sure one was a knockoff of the classic burgundy and navy striped one), but I definitely bought Rooster ties - the squared-off knit ones - when I started to learn about Ivy style post college.

In the '80s, living in NYC, I can remember wearing jeans, an OCBD, a Shetland, a Rooster knit tie, a herringbone tweed sport coat and desert boots as my "sporty" going out to a bar or casual restaurant outfit (my riff on Redford's outfit in "Three Days of the Condor," without the Redford good looks).
Provided solely via the magic of Google! Mine are long gone. But these well represent the genre. A wide variety of clever prints, in small editions each. Cheaply made with just a canvas lining, cheaply sold and not intended for longevity, it's amazing these still exist, unless reissued.

Staying with "big" overcoats. Anyway ever heard of Stoneface fabrics?

The way this ad reads reminds me of the way cars used to be made where the manufacture, say, Cadillac would build out the chassis (with all the mechanical parts, engine, etc. in) and then turn it over to a "body" shop to build out the, well, "body" (the exterior design pieces and place were everyone sits - also called the "carriage," a term carried over from the horse-and-buggy days) to be completed.

You'll see old ads that read: "Cadillac, body by Fisher."
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Great coats! But I know them only from ads like this handsome illustration.