Peak and Pine

Honors Member
4,607
United States
Maine
Mars Hill
I've got shelves of home canned goods, a deer and a pair of big ducks in the freezer...I don't understand people who shop from week to week and don't have any reserves.
Probably because most of us don't have a dead deer in the cupboard, necessitating trolling the aisles weekly looking for beans, bananas and, on occasion, babes.
 
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Big T

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
489
United States
PA
DuBois
At 67, raised in a small town, in a rural county, hunting was normal, in season and out. What was never accepted, was not eating your harvest!

My grandfather had a small grocery store and butcher shop, with a side of venison hanging in the cooler a normal sight. I was maybe 4 or 5 with my dad and an uncle, butchering a deer, & being the nib I heard I was, I deserved some special treatment when I was making a fuss about being hungry. My dad cut the windpipe from the deer, cut a piece off, washed it and gave it to me, saying it was a piece of macaroni. I remember walking around, chewing on that piece of pasta, before spitting it out, mainly because I was being laughed at.
 

Howard

Connoisseur
16,378
United States
New York
Bayside
Gosh, I keep my larders full. I've got shelves of home canned goods, a deer and a pair of big ducks in the freezer, flour, eggs. I don't understand people who shop from week to week and don't have any reserves.

Don't forget toilet paper and hand sanitizer too, Sarge.
 

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Advanced Member
2,142
Atlanta, Georgia
United States
Georgia
Atlanta
Gosh, I keep my larders full. I've got shelves of home canned goods, a deer and a pair of big ducks in the freezer, flour, eggs. I don't understand people who shop from week to week and don't have any reserves.
An interesting question....

Over the last 12 years I have lived in densely populated urban areas with food stores on every corner and within a 2 minute walk. As a result there was no need to stock up on items. We bought fresh daily. Nothing canned or pre prepared.

Also, I have found that most people who live in dense urban apartment situations don’t have a lot of room to store extra stuff. Some of my kitchens barely had room to store basic kitchen stuff as most folks in my social group went out to eat every night or picked picked up to go orders. My current apartment does not have a full size fridge or freezer to save space. Plus a lot of Emory students live(d) in my complex, and kids don’t cook, so no need for huge kitchens.

I am a country boy, so I know the value of preparing. I am having to dust off my skills!

Cheers,

BSR
 

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Advanced Member
2,142
Atlanta, Georgia
United States
Georgia
Atlanta
My wife was freaking out about food security yesterday, so I found a farm which would sell me a pig and a quarter of a cow... couple hundred, maybe three-hundred pounds of meat. So I decided to buy a freezer chest (~11 cu.ft), but there are NONE.

Count freezers among the panic casualties of retail.

Then I finally went to a huge international grocer which primarily serves immigrant/ethnic communities (The Buford Highway Farmer's Market, for those in Atlanta) and came away with loads of meats, eggs, whatever. Well, except toilet paper. Still, apparently these communities are less inclined to panic and hoarding (or maybe the BHFM just has an amazing supply chain.)

So, larders full.

DH
Love Buford Highway!

I had never seen a full hide chicharonnes before I went there.

Cheers,

BSR
 

Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
13,448
On the banks of the Willamette
United States
Oregon
Oak Grove
Even though both my children live in apartments, it's easy for me to forget that so many of us live in minimal space accommodations. I only lived in an apartment for a few very circumscribed times in the first few years of marriage and have been a low-status suburbanite for decades. I've always had a garage (never with a car in it) and one sort of pantry or another. Being (as all here can easily attest) obsessed with food, gardening, fishing, hunting, canning and freezing are second nature to me. I do it for fun. That, on occasion, it turns out to have been prudence, is just a side benefit.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
22,763
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
For any who might find it helpful to have a current table of the Covid-19 pandemic by U.S. state, I've found the table at the following link to be generally accurate, and reasonably up to date -



Edit: Preliminary observation suggests that population density may be a significant factor in the spread of the disease. I.e., the denser the population, the quicker it spreads and the more people are affected. Some studies have already suggested this, though it's unknown whether this will result in a smaller percentage of the total population infected in less dense areas, or simply delay the progress. I have a suspicion that a smaller percentage will ultimately be infected in more sparsely populated regions.
 
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Dhaller

Advanced Member
2,152
United States
Georgia
Atlanta
For any who might find it helpful to have a current table of the Covid-19 pandemic by U.S. state, I've found the table at the following link to be generally accurate, and reasonably up to date -



Edit: Preliminary observation suggests that population density may be a significant factor in the spread of the disease. I.e., the denser the population, the quicker it spreads and the more people are affected. Some studies have already suggested this, though it's unknown whether this will result in a smaller percentage of the total population infected in less dense areas, or simply delay the progress. I have a suspicion that a smaller percentage will ultimately be infected in more sparsely populated regions.
Absolutely, population density is a factor.

I mean, consider the limiting case of a man who lives alone on an island. He can't get it.

Well... unless it comes in on a parcel. Rural folk still need to take precautions with mail and packages. While rural infections might be rarer, those people also have less access to emergency medical care (respirators and such). There is always a trade off.

I shudder to think of what might happen in May, when the cold/flu season begins in the Southern Hemisphere/equatorial region. India, Africa, and so on - dense populations, poverty, failed states. It is going to be *horrific*.

I plan on sitting down to do some modeling this evening (I'm work occasionally with a risk-analysis group usually focused on modeling terrorism, and now we're developing some pandemic forecasting models).

Right now I'm guessing ~75 million deaths globally by the time this runs its course.

Probably Italy will briefly take the reins as #1 infection site by tonight, and the USA will lap them by Saturday, at which point the USA will be the worst-hit country until India takes over in May(ish).

It's breathtaking, the degree to which the USA has failed to respond to this pandemic.

DH