StephenRG

Honors Member
I have just finished bingeing on the first season (refreshing childhood memories). Restricting my comments to sartorial notes:

1. In general, anyone wearing a suit in the show could walk off the set and into any business place now without anyone thinking they were out of style - other than button stance not being as high nor suits as tight as favoured by modern fashion tragics. Indeed, it is remarkable how little has changed. Lapels are medium, shirt collars are medium spread, etc.

2. Tie knots are invariably four-in-hand, and small.

3. Every western man in hot climes wears a light-coloured suit (I'm guessing cream because they're seldom if ever pure white) and usually a panama (authentic or no, I can't tell).

4. When John Drake (McGoohan) wears a blazer, it's invariably DB, though he's an American (kinda - this gets blurred towards the end and when the series returned he was now English. Don't ask.) I wonder when Americans turned against DB blazers.
 

Matt S

Connoisseur
There's a lot of great style in that show. John Drake, despite being American, is dressing in mostly an English style of the time. The English didn't know how to dress a man like an American, and vice versa.

Maybe the single-button suits were a nod to Hollywood style. The English were mostly wearing three-button suits at the time. These days I tend to think of single-button suits as very English as they're very popular at the moment with bespoke tailors (not just a Huntsman thing), but in the 1960s they were a Hollywood thing. Dick Van Dyke's Beverly Hills tailors made them for The Dick Van Dyke Show. Don Adams wears them on Get Smart and Eddie Albert wears them on Green Acres, though those were all after Danger Man started. American musicians and entertainers of the era also wore them.

Were Americans ever that much into double-breasted blazers? I still see people wearing them in New York, though perhaps not as much as I did 20 years ago. The single-breasted blazer would have been much more American at the time of Danger Man.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
I have just finished bingeing on the first season (refreshing childhood memories). Restricting my comments to sartorial notes:

1. In general, anyone wearing a suit in the show could walk off the set and into any business place now without anyone thinking they were out of style - other than button stance not being as high nor suits as tight as favoured by modern fashion tragics. Indeed, it is remarkable how little has changed. Lapels are medium, shirt collars are medium spread, etc.

2. Tie knots are invariably four-in-hand, and small.

3. Every western man in hot climes wears a light-coloured suit (I'm guessing cream because they're seldom if ever pure white) and usually a panama (authentic or no, I can't tell).

4. When John Drake (McGoohan) wears a blazer, it's invariably DB, though he's an American (kinda - this gets blurred towards the end and when the series returned he was now English. Don't ask.) I wonder when Americans turned against DB blazers.
Ahh . . . thank you for bringing this to my attention! 👍

Mr. McGoohan certainly did know how to wear clothes. Wonder if it was his own personal wardrobe, if not, I hope he contracted to take it with him after shooting. ;)

An era when decent clothing in films was remarkably well done in every aspect. This series escaped my attention at the time, a deficiency I shall attempt to correct.


McGoohan01-done.jpg



McGoohan02-done.jpg
 

Andy

Site Creator/ Administrator
Staff member
Anything British is worth watching just for the clothing.

BTW "Danger Man" was known in the US as Secret Agent and the theme song was "Secret Agent Man". And then there was "The Prisoner"!

Series 1 "The Danger Man Theme", composed by Edwin Astley
Series 2–4 "High Wire", composed by Edwin Astley
Series 2–4 in the US as Secret Agent, "Secret Agent Man", theme composed by P. F. Sloan and Steve Barri, and recorded by Johnny Rivers.
 

StephenRG

Honors Member
An era when decent clothing in films was remarkably well done in every aspect. This series escaped my attention at the time, a deficiency I shall attempt to correct.
Be warned - the first season shows are 25 minutes long and as a result there are some horrible jumps within episodes, nor is there time for neat wrap-ups.

Lots of other things - many actors appear as different characters in different episodes. Everyone speaks English wherever Drake is. Whitewashing is egregious - in general bit parts may be played by "ethnically appropriate" actors but almost invariable the major foreign roles are played by English actors made up to look foreign. Lots of actors later turn up in Bond films - indeed, it's fun spotting them - as well as, unsurprisingly, The Prisoner. If you're familiar with British actors of times past (I am), there are a ton of them who turn up, not always in large roles. Finally, with a very few exceptions, all the leading women have the same figure. You could switch the heads around and not guess who was whom.
 

StephenRG

Honors Member
Anything British is worth watching just for the clothing.

BTW "Danger Man" was known in the US as Secret Agent and the theme song was "Secret Agent Man". And then there was "The Prisoner"!

Series 1 "The Danger Man Theme", composed by Edwin Astley
Series 2–4 "High Wire", composed by Edwin Astley
Series 2–4 in the US as Secret Agent, "Secret Agent Man", theme composed by P. F. Sloan and Steve Barri, and recorded by Johnny Rivers.
IMO "High Wire" is one of the great TV themes.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Just watched the first episode (slow work afternoon and one of the benefits of working for yourself).

I had never even heard of the show before this thread. "Danger Man" is an awful title.

Based on one episode, reminds me of other shows like " Peter Gunn" and "The Saint" that were on about the same time. Also, Patrick McGoohan looks a bit like a young Paul Newman and sounds a lot like a young William Shatner.

From this episode, not much to add to the comments above about the clothes; although, he did wear - when visiting a resort-looking town on the coast of Italy - a cream suit (as noted above), but with a dark two button polo shirt with the top button undone and the polo shirt's collar over the suit jacket's collar.

It looked better than it sounds and probably was pretty cool at the time. There were also a couple of interesting period cars, but I'm not a car guy so don't know what they were.

I'm up for another episode though.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Just watched the first episode (slow work afternoon and one of the benefits of working for yourself).

I had never even heard of the show before this thread. "Danger Man" is an awful title.

Based on one episode, reminds me of other shows like " Peter Gunn" and "The Saint" that were on about the same time. Also, Patrick McGoohan looks a bit like a young Paul Newman and sounds a lot like a young William Shatner.

From this episode, not much to add to the comments above about the clothes; although, he did wear - when visiting a resort-looking town on the coast of Italy - a cream suit (as noted above), but with a dark two button polo shirt with the top button undone and the polo shirt's collar over the suit jacket's collar.

It looked better than it sounds and probably was pretty cool at the time. There were also a couple of interesting period cars, but I'm not a car guy so don't know what they were.

I'm up for another episode though.
As Andy suggests in his post #6, Danger Man was shown in the USA as "Secret Agent Man," "He lived a life of danger and nobody knew his name...Secret Agent Man!" Looking up Secret Agent Man might yield better results, giving a more holistic perspective on the series. Good hunting! ;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
As Andy suggests in his post #6, Danger Man was shown in the USA as "Secret Agent Man," "He lived a life of danger and nobody knew his name...Secret Agent Man!" Looking up Secret Agent Man might yield better results, giving a more holistic perspective on the series. Good hunting! ;)
Good color - thank you. That's a much better name. I did a little (and incomplete) internet work on it yesterday and found that the series seems to have had three different iterations with, at least, four different versions of the name. I'm going to watch a few more season-one episodes and, then, go from there.
 
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