Adriel Rowley

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Boys grow fast and Oma didn't notice his dress shirt collar was getting tight and thinking it was the tie until later in life. That is where his name for ties came from: choke rags. He did regularly wear them to Church and occasionally to work (most days spent around test equipment so was just for the meeting on Thursdays, don't know why that just popped into my head) until about the early 1990s when his wife divorced him, though still purchasing ties until recently, as seen by two shirts paired with two new ties hanging in front of the closet, make me kind of sad.





All I ever seen Dad do was hang most ties with the jacket he thought it be good with, though never quit found wearing his cream slub sport coat with blinding bright ties.







The stuff outside included a box with female handwriting not of Oma's or his ex, that being in a hurry, tossed onto the truck. Turns out had a couple dozen ties, so now wondering if why he quit wearing ties as they had gone missing.

These were brand new. I am hoping the Lands End is the same era as one of my favorites in the way it knots really nice.



The two flag ties were found tossed in stuff, the white and the green paisley found in a bag of stuff from the other house, the rest again from the box outside. The white tie along with a dark purple vest and a moron six button roll five coat was by a mystery woman he never talked about named Elizabeth, who he seems to have called Liz (found a couple pictures of her which he labeled). I am thrilled to have the tie because the others don't fit, because obviously they were special to each other and made by hand. One of my projects is find the letter with the convent address and see if still there or somehow see if can be found.


See the last six ties on the bottom row? They are Robert Talbott ties for the Ascot Shop, more on them later. Suffice to say they are the most expensive ties of my collection now (using an inflation calculator be about $75 a piece). The one with the pink stripe is an interesting half cotton and half silk blend.

Then there are Dad's airplane ties. He grew up during the Golden Age of Flight, flying wire controlled models from age eight until he got his pilot's license when 15 if memory serves (he was proud that he got it before his diver's license), and sometime in the late 1970s purchased a partly built home-built which sadly life got in the way, though if all goes to plan, I am donating to the EAA. Point is, can tell something about the man by the ties he wears.




 

Adriel Rowley

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Mesa
Let us step back in time to when Dad was working at his first or second (and last job in his life) back in the 1970s and have a look at his sport coat.



And a blue and black striped Botany 500 suit, not sure what to make of it. Amused as have taken a liking to Botany 500 in part a little more edgy and size fits well, though this is wild.



I am thinking this is also when Dad saved up a lot of money and bought a higher end overcoat (the way he talked about it). Just run of the mill, except the tag, especially as never heard of the Clipper Mist Company.



Now onto those Ascot Shop coats, made by Southwick.





This is the only sport coat or suit I ever seen him in and defiantly a favorite as the garment bag has had it, especially as the zipper pull is completely missing. Bet this was supposed to be his Summer coat (based on the Easter-Labor Day rule and being slightly less weight than the other sport coat). As a lad loved the feel of it and no one had anything like it, why I bought the silk slub when found it at Goodwill never thinking own his this soon.



For some reason the colors always been off on the cellular, this is a cream and grey herringbone.



And the dark blue, almost navy blazer.


Dad had the blazer's buttons changed at the shop to those with biplanes, so very him. Therefore, I will be wearing this to the get together I organized for him (though sans tie as per the invitations instructions).
 

Adriel Rowley

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This is the pullover from the Ascot Shop.


This one couldn't get all the spots out, though very light, small, and in the back, so bet no one will notice.


These two were hand knitted by someone, wish I knew who. I do know Oma and his Sister knitted, though the latter has said nothing and maybe for the better. Not sure about the colour of the first, though love the varigation on the second and see it going well with tweed, right?




This one is exactly the same brand and colour as Opa's that I already have and is one of my favorites because fits well and comfortable (love reglan sleeves and too bad don't make sport coats with them), so now don't have to worry so much wearing it out.


And a cheery colour for those dull cloudy days or Spring.
 

Adriel Rowley

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And finally Dad's everyday items.

The large pocket knives were found in Dad's desk and doing research are ordinarily knifes from the mid 1960s though the 1970s. Think a bit large to carry unless going to go to work in jeans, though already have used one on a project.

Instead, we children remember Dad by the Victorinox he was never was without for many tasks, including tweezer out a splinter or use the knife to open presents in such a way to save the paper (which I quickly learned and still do in part as adds to the fun slowing everyone).

The older Timex (have yet to get a battery so not sure if works) and the green Victorinox were in a bag of magazines almost tossed thinking all that was in the bag. Green was both our favorite colour and already carry it when I go out.

Have always loved Dad's wedding band because of how it felt and looked and my Sister found it tossed in a desk in the dining room he had used for his computer. So glad to find it and later in his desk found the boxes. It fits perfectly. though doubt ever wear it as a wedding band (if do see if can just add engraving and leave the original as part of its story), can I wear it just as a ring?
 

Adriel Rowley

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Permit me to echo Acct2000's condolences. I am so very sorry to hear of your loss and will pray for you to find a sense of inner peace, as you deal with this new reality. The personal articles you have inherited will prove to be a wonderful way for you to remember your Father and your Opa, as you use those garments/articles in your daily activities.
Appreciate the kindness and prayer. This is very much a "new reality", as not only have I lost my Parent (my biological mother didn't raise me and have no attachment to her), though found out my Brother doesn't like to be around me as annoying and a bother (let me know many times and good thing as now know not to move to Texas as we had planned for years) and my Aunt isn't the person she was (plus not speaking to any of us children).

As I said, already carry Dad's pocket knife, plus worn both sport coats. Here is when wore everything of his to a doctor's appointment, including vintage pink socks, except of course underwear. 😉 Ha.
 

Adriel Rowley

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I forgot the 1980s socks! In that aforementioned box from the family home packed in 1992, found socks, many brand new. Not the over the calf which I prefer, though better than nothing and are in fun colours.








 

Adriel Rowley

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I extend my condolences as well and while I know clothing is a poor consolation to still having your father or opa, it's nice to have that connection, especially as somebody who appreciates menswear as your presence here would indicate that you do.

The WWII era peacoat may be the consensus gem (with the rollneck sweater and the tweed jacket not far behind) but I think the real find is the old paperwork and those punch card receipts(!!) for the olive sport coat.
Appreciated. It is because of Opa, Oma, and Dad have an interest in menswear. At times Dad and I be in a clothing store and he go check the tie clearance rack and was fun. Yes, not the same having them, though can tell you when needing them with you, next best is something of theirs.

The paperwork is something else, isn't it?! I am being careful to put back into the inside pocket (have already worn once). Though you can't wear paperwork. 😉
 

Adriel Rowley

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702
United States
AZ
Mesa
I can only echo the comments above, but still want to add my condolences.

I lost my father 29 years ago and the few things of his I have are a nice reminder of him. I hope having a few of your father's things also helps you in some small way.
Appreciate the condolence.

Yes, can tell you it helps. When all hell was breaking loose clearing out Oma and Opa's. I reach in my pocket and fiddle with Dad's knife. I also wore a pair of his work pants and the day Uncle found Opa's tooled belt wore that for a day and get overwhelming look down and think about all the work he put into it. Silly I know, though better than yelling like the other folks were.

I know in 29 years be a easier to cope with. That's what someone told me when lost Oma last February (she was my Mommy) and can say it is getting better.
 

Adriel Rowley

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702
United States
AZ
Mesa
My condolences as well. Clothing passed down is a great remembrance.
It is truly appreciated.

Love it if could pass not only my clothing, though also Opa's and Dads (why I am obsessive in caring for it). So far seems possible as my nephew who will be one 9 November is a bean pole. 😉 Even better be Jack enjoying them in part of who was custodian before.
 

Adriel Rowley

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702
United States
AZ
Mesa
Please also accept my condolences. It's never easy to lose a parent but when you keep their memory alive they're never truly gone. This year marks the 10th anniversary of my Mother's passing, and the 4th year of my Fathers. Everyone grieves differently so I won't tell you how to feel just now. But I can share with you that for me, the sadness of losing them eased and I'm able to remember the good times without sadness. May those inherited clothes bring you memories of the good times.
Appreciated, even if say it over and over.

When I lost Oma, hit me really hard. With Dad, it isn't as hard, think in part because already been don this road?

Tell you there are times where can't keep it together, like walking in the bedroom and his wallet, glasses, pocket knife (which also have that one), and watch all sitting on the nightstand, or seeing his stuff on the hanger's bench and work table as if he was coming back, or when the radio played "When a Man Loves a Woman" (Fits Dad so well, he loved her, she married him only for money, he tried so hard to keep her and the family to his many detriments, and she still ran off with the children. Never said anything, though in his piano music was a copy, so guess he felt the same.).

Honestly, I am not sure I feel anything. I been fighting bad bought of depression since our spat back beginning of April (I wouldn't mail him something overnight the next day and tried to tell him was too overwhelmed at the moment and needed a couple few days). Getting abandoned by family many doesn't help either and none of the few friends I have can or want to do anything. For a while it be weeks before I go out the front door, even to get the mail. Making sure I at least get on here and chat. I be with family, start eating, and walk off. Sister too busy with her more important life. Honestly feel if something did happen wouldn't be missed much.
 
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