Intrepid

Super Member
1,746
United States
Okla.
Nichols Hills
Very little has changed since Harris started this forum, long ago. It is a place for kindred spirits to gather and discuss things like 3/2 roll jackets, tassel loafers, etc.

The only significant change has been the style of displaying facial hair. I'm agnostic on the matter, but wondered what those that post here think?
 

Andy

Site Creator/ Administrator
Staff member
12,785
United States
California
Palm Desert
A couple of points:

Hair longer than shoulder length for women and over the ears for men diminishes perception of authority, but increases accessibility.

There is a "Rule of Seven" in women's fashion that applies to men as well. The "rule" states that there should be no more than seven points of interest on your body at any one time!

The theory is that too much visual stimulation detracts from the total look.

Points of interest could be a watch, pocket square, bright tie, blazer buttons, braces, belt buckle, cuff links, fashion glasses, facial hair, vest, anything that could draw attention to that item.

Some caveats for traditional business wear: Class rings are best left in your jewelry box after you enter the business world. Ornate belt buckles (like your 1985 Rodeo Champ) should not be worn with a suit

 

OCBD365

Starting Member
21
United States
California
Santa Cruz
I researched this about a month ago and this was in the comments of an Ivy style article:

According to a great little essay by C. Northcote Parkinson “the clean-shaven face is associated with…periods of dominance” while the “beard has characterised periods of uncertainty”. Worse, the beard has been associated with bad architecture (1858-1908 with a slight recovery in 1890) while clean chins with great architecture (1650-1850). Worse again, beards gave us “furniture and interior decoration [that] reached a climax of inconvenience, ugliness and bulk.” Chapter 9, ‘Barbarity’ from The Law of Delay, John Murray, 1970 (with illustrations by Osbert Lancaster)
 
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Oldsarge

Moderator and Bon Vivant
12,702
On the banks of the Willamette
United States
Oregon
Oak Grove
It has been alleged that beards become fashionable when a queen sits on the throne of England. Of course, that does a very poor job of explaining Edward VII. I think C. Northcote Parkinson was an ass of the first water.
 

Lucido

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
276
Ireland
Munster
Limerick
A man either shaves daily or grows a magnificent beard.

Anything else is sheer laziness or lack of commitment.
 

Lucido

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
276
Ireland
Munster
Limerick
Such a quaint, outdated viewpoint.
Perhaps, but a man can't escape his upbringing and leaving the house without shaving past the age of twelve would have been as anathema for me as not brushing my teeth or combing my hair.
 

Ungentleman

New Member
65
Japan
Tokyo
Tokyo
After being mostly clean-shaven and occasionally bearded in civilian life, I sported a mustache for over a year until my commanding officer's policy no longer allowed for anything but being clean-shaven. Orders are orders. I shaved, but I was sad to see it go.

I honestly felt that a trim mustache fit my face very well--like two friends divided by circumstance who had found each other after a long and difficult separation. Being somewhat insulated from the popular fashions of civvy street, I didn't much have to worry about the fact that mustaches are even less acceptable in the modern West than either full beards or hairless cheeks. In my circle they were good-to-go.

It did, however, tend to dry out my skin, and I had a large red patch on my upper lip for a week after I shaved it off. I was forced to apply moisturizer and Head & Shoulders daily until my skin cleared up.