eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Reading through the many posts in this thread, I am reminded of a book I read awhile back entitled Fire In The Belly: A Treatise on Being A Man, written by Sam Keen of the Harvard Divinity School. Perhaps it was through our penchant for hot sauce that we acquired the fire(s) in our respective belly's? LOL. ;)
 

mikel

Partner / Administrator
Staff member
Ugh, I made my purchase of @Oldsarge's Hot Sauce using my personal Amazon account -- an account I almost never use. Now Amazon won't let me write a review because my account doesn't yet meet the minimum requirements of spending $50 within 12 months :(

I guess I'll have to buy more hot sauce!
 

Mr Humphries

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Not really a hot sauce but Blueberry Hills Preserves Chilli Jam is an outstanding accompaniment to, amongst other things, a good slice of gala or pork pie.. Their Ginger Curd is also v scrummy.
 

David J. Cooper

Super Member
This item does not ship to Canada. Scorned again. I will have to get by with the excellent small batch sauce made locally by Maan Farms.

Not sure who Vladimir S. is but that is quite the review.
 

mikel

Partner / Administrator
Staff member
@Oldsarge - great job on the new photos!

@David J. Cooper - if OldSarge can't get the ship-to Canada thing straightened out, I'd be happy to order a bottle for you and ship it to you. I'm probably going to buy another bottle very soon, so I could include your bottle in my order pretty easily.

LMK if that's something you'd be interested in.
 

TKI67

Super Member
Although ghost peppers may go to 1,000,000 or more Scoville units, not all sauces made with them bring nearly that level of heat. The Melinda’s Naga Jolokia is certainly hot, but not nearly as hot a eating fresh chiltepins off the push. I haven’t looked them up lately, but I vaguely recall they are in the 50,000 Scoville units range. As I’m nearing the bottom of my jar of Mina’s Spicy Harissa I’m thinking it’s about time to order Sarge’s sauce to ensure that the hot sauce shelf in the fridge stays full! I keep a range from low heat and vinegary like Cholula to medium heat and sweet like Sriracha to higher hear like Mina’s and Melinda’s with a few quirky ones, including home made chiltepins, to round out the shelf. And then there are salsas...
 

TKI67

Super Member
Howard my friend, and others, seriously hot sauces and peppers can indeed be more than unpleasant to some. If you aren’t a regular pepper fiend, have some suitable cooling agent at the ready. Milk or sour cream will work well. Beer or water just spreads the heat around. I watched a guy order Nuclear Shrimp at a notoriously spicy Thai restaurant. He ordered a big bottle of Chimay (probably thinking that if was the most expensive it must be the best) to douse the flames. A bit later he was still in agony but also bombed. Also, if you touch hot peppers, wash your fingers very thoroughly before you touch anything like your eyes or other sensitive areas below the belt. When I make homemade salsa from mango, red onion, lime, and ghost peppers, or even lesser peppers like habaneros or even chiltepins or Serranos, I’m super careful with the seeding and mincing. Gloves aren’t a bad idea.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Howard my friend, and others, seriously hot sauces and peppers can indeed be more than unpleasant to some. If you aren’t a regular pepper fiend, have some suitable cooling agent at the ready. Milk or sour cream will work well. Beer or water just spreads the heat around. I watched a guy order Nuclear Shrimp at a notoriously spicy Thai restaurant. He ordered a big bottle of Chimay (probably thinking that if was the most expensive it must be the best) to douse the flames. A bit later he was still in agony but also bombed. Also, if you touch hot peppers, wash your fingers very thoroughly before you touch anything like your eyes or other sensitive areas below the belt. When I make homemade salsa from mango, red onion, lime, and ghost peppers, or even lesser peppers like habaneros or even chiltepins or Serranos, I’m super careful with the seeding and mincing. Gloves aren’t a bad idea.
To my mind, when dealing with any peppers beyond bells or maybe poblanos, gloves are essential. Caution is the byword.
Great advice that I, for one will immediately put to good use! ;)