CMDC

Honors Member
3,604
United States
DC
Washington
Thanks for all the advice and recommendations. Turns out the question was moot for now. I stopped back yesterday and the jacket was gone, although it may be in the reshelving process. Good resources for future use though.
 

32rollandrock

Connoisseur
6,894
United States
illinois
springfield
Related question:

Is a re-weave possible for a Burberry-style trench raincoat? I ask because I found a Paul Stuart MIE, all cotton, that's gorgeous and complete, right down to the wool liner, but that has a small hole in a sleeve.
 

sbdivemaster

Super Member
1,843
United States
Shangri-La
..
Related question:

Is a re-weave possible for a Burberry-style trench raincoat? I ask because I found a Paul Stuart MIE, all cotton, that's gorgeous and complete, right down to the wool liner, but that has a small hole in a sleeve.
Without actually seeing the fabric, if it's like the stuff that the London Fog trenches are made of, I'd have to say that your not going to be able to get a reweave on that. The threads are just too fine, and the weave is just too tight.

Of course, I'd have to see the fabric to give a definitive answer...
 

32rollandrock

Connoisseur
6,894
United States
illinois
springfield
That would be my guess, as well. A patch the size of a dime would be more than sufficient, however. I suspect this is going to turn into one of those should-I-or-shouldn't-I debates, although if it's still there on Tuesday, it will be reduced to $1, at which point I suspect I'll cave and offer it up on the Exchange for enough to cover shipping.

Without actually seeing the fabric, if it's like the stuff that the London Fog trenches are made of, I'd have to say that your not going to be able to get a reweave on that. The threads are just too fine, and the weave is just too tight.

Of course, I'd have to see the fabric to give a definitive answer...
 

stubloom

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
121
United States
Arizona
Scottsdale
2 points:

1. sbdivemaster is right on. The finer the weave, the more likely the reweave will show. The lighter the color, the more likely the reweave will show. The "plainer" the fabric design, the more likely it is to show. Conversely, the courser the weave, the darker the color and the "busier" the pattern, the less likely it will "show".

Further, unless the garment is a bulky sweater such as a cable knit sweater, the reweaver will have to use a piece weave (a square or rectangular piece of fabric removed from some other area of the garment such as the inside of the hem) and reweave that piece into the affected area.

Piece weaves will ALWAYS show. There is no such thing as "invisible mending" when it comes to a piece weave. So on a light colored trench coat, the possibility of achieving a good result (defined as a reweave that doesn't show) is near impossible.

2. Regarding moth holes that are visible to the eye, it's a probably a good thing that you didn't purchase that Burberry sport coat. Here's why...

It's the larvae of the female moth that feed on the nutrients in the fabric when they hatch. These nutrients come from perspiration and body oils in the garment. That's the ONLY reason the female moth chose to lay her eggs in that garment. When the larvae feed, they tend to feed on the surface threads, causing those threads to be very weak. You might have seen one hole, but I'd bet that many more holes will open up as soon as the garment is cleaned. As the garment tumbles in the dry cleaning machine, some stress is placed on those weak threads and all of a sudden you have five holes instead of one hole. And there goes the entire rationale for the purchase in the first place.

Moral of the story: Always dry clean a garment before you send a garment to a reweaver. That way you can evaluate the economic viability of reweaving ALL the holes instead of only those holes that are visible to the naked eye.
 
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32rollandrock

Connoisseur
6,894
United States
illinois
springfield
I always learn from your posts. Thanks.

2 points:

1. sbdivemaster is right on. The finer the weave, the more likely the reweave will show. The lighter the color, the more likely the reweave will show. The "plainer" the fabric design, the more likely it is to show. Conversely, the courser the weave, the darker the color and the "busier" the pattern, the less likely it will "show".

Further, unless the garment is a bulky sweater such as a cable knit sweater, the reweaver will have to use a piece weave (a square or rectangular piece of fabric removed from some other area of the garment such as the inside of the hem) and reweave that piece into the affected area.

Piece weaves will ALWAYS show. There is no such thing as "invisible mending" when it comes to a piece weave. So on a light colored trench coat, the possibility of achieving a good result (defined as a reweave that doesn't show) is near impossible.

2. Regarding moth holes that are visible to the eye, it's a probably a good thing that you didn't purchase that Burberry sport coat. Here's why...

It's the larvae of the female moth that feed on the nutrients in the fabric when they hatch. These nutrients come from perspiration and body oils in the garment. That's the ONLY reason the female moth chose to lay her eggs in that garment. When the larvae feed, they tend to feed on the surface threads, causing those threads to be very weak. You might have seen one hole, but I'd bet that many more holes will open up as soon as the garment is cleaned. As the garment tumbles in the dry cleaning machine, some stress is placed on those weak threads and all of a sudden you have five holes instead of one hole. And there goes the entire rationale for the purchase in the first place.

Moral of the story: Always dry clean a garment before you send a garment to a reweaver. That way you can evaluate the economic viability of reweaving ALL the holes instead of only those holes that are visible to the naked eye.
 

The Rambler

Honors Member
4,726
me, too (this one would have saved me some dough); but one question, Stu: if moth larvae are actually eating grease spots, etc (as I have often heard), why dont they eat grease-spotted cotton?
 

sbdivemaster

Super Member
1,843
United States
Shangri-La
..
2 points:

1. sbdivemaster is right on...

2. Regarding moth holes that are visible to the eye, it's a probably a good thing that you didn't purchase that Burberry sport coat. Here's why...

It's the larvae of the female moth that feed on the nutrients in the fabric when they hatch. These nutrients come from perspiration and body oils in the garment. That's the ONLY reason the female moth chose to lay her eggs in that garment. When the larvae feed, they tend to feed on the surface threads, causing those threads to be very weak. You might have seen one hole, but I'd bet that many more holes will open up as soon as the garment is cleaned. As the garment tumbles in the dry cleaning machine, some stress is placed on those weak threads and all of a sudden you have five holes instead of one hole. And there goes the entire rationale for the purchase in the first place.

Moral of the story: Always dry clean a garment before you send a garment to a reweaver. That way you can evaluate the economic viability of reweaving ALL the holes instead of only those holes that are visible to the naked eye.
1. Thank you, sir. :icon_smile:

2. This is why ALL thrifted clothing should be quarantined before being brought into your home. UC Davis' IPM Program has detailed information about clothing moths. Everything I purchase spends 72+ hours in my chest freezer (inside a tightly closed plastic bag) before coming inside. Moth larvae feed on animal based fibers, but will munch on cotton if it's blended with wool, silk, etc.
 

stubloom

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
121
United States
Arizona
Scottsdale
Response to sbdivemaster:

The idea of quarantining all thrifted garments is good. That should kill any larvae that have just hatched and are CURRENTLY feeding on those wool fibers.

But let me make one further point: the damage might already have been done -- days, months or even years before. Which is why it's so important to carefully examine all thrifted wool garments for signs of "moth damage" (holes or surface feeding) PRIOR TO PURCHASE.

I'm surprised that garment resellers don't dry clean all their gently used garments before listing those garments for resale. That way the reseller can guarantee that a purchaser won't be surprised to discover multiple holes in their garment after the first dry cleaning.

I understand that this may add to the cost of their operations but that small added cost could be a great differentiator. Imagine the positive reaction from a potential customer if a reseller could guarantee -- up front -- that all wool garments purchased from his site have been dry cleaned prior to sale, and that the likelihood that the garment has moth damage, prior to sale, is practically zero.
 
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sbdivemaster

Super Member
1,843
United States
Shangri-La
..
^^^

Oh yeah, the damage is done; the quarantine is just to keep the moths from spreading.

Been checking out your site and blog - good stuff. :icon_smile: