Apples555

Starting Member
17
United States
MD
North Potomac
I'm looking for a hardy casual but elegant shoe. I was thinking about this pair of Meermins. I already have a pair of more formal Meermins and really like them. Has anyone worn Meermins relatively often to see how durable they are?
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
14,556
United States
Illinois
Chicago
There are a few members here, specifically momsdoc, who have pretty good knowledge and experience with this brand, so I’m sure they will chime in.

In general, a well made pair of Goodyear welted shoes should last a long time provided they are well taken care of and not abused.
 

Apples555

Starting Member
17
United States
MD
North Potomac
I mean durable, resistant to less-than-ideal weather, long journeys, etc.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
21,578
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
I'm looking for a hardy casual but elegant shoe. I was thinking about this pair of Meermins. I already have a pair of more formal Meermins and really like them. Has anyone worn Meermins relatively often to see how durable they are?
I mean durable, resistant to less-than-ideal weather, long journeys, etc.
I do not yet have a pair of Meermin's. But in answering your question, there are three variables; the shoe, how it's worn and how it's cared for which will determine the answer. As was stated, despite some cranks insistence to the contrary, quality Goodyear welted shoes tend to be quite durable. As you likely know, Meermin shoes are made in China and finished in Mallorca. Despite quality issues with many products made in China, enough knowledgeable individuals have commended the average quality of Meermins for me to expect they will be very good quality for the price. Of course, this doesn't mean an individual pair can't have issues, but that's even true of much more costly makes, and should that occur, they should be exchanged.

Materials relate directly to the intended use. Goodyear welting and calf uppers are fine for most general use. But I grow concerned over criteria including bad weather and long journeys. As in, how bad, and how long? Do you anticipate slogging through deluges or slush for 12 hours? If so, we're talking about a whole different class of footwear requirements. I.e., purpose made shoes or boots for such conditions and use. But if you're only considering the occasional rain storm, or slush, and a full day of wear, conventional footwear should suffice. However, I would suggest you consider a loafer with a quality rubber sole rather than leather. It will wear roughly twice as long as a leather sole of equivalent thickness, and a rubber sole is impermeable to water. (However this does not mean it's waterproof. Water still can penetrate through both the upper and welt, but it can't penetrate the sole.)

I know that Meermin makes a variety of models with rubber soles, including loafers, and should there be any that strike your fancy, I would recommend you consider them. I am a personal fan of Sanders and Sanders shoes made in England for having an excellent combination of quality and value. They're a little bit more than Meermin, but less than many other equivalent makes. I have four pairs, and mention them specifically because from personal experience I can attest that they are extremely sturdy shoes. They also make a variety of styles with rubber soles.

But the variable which will probably determine more than either of those above how well they suit your wishes is how you care for your shoes. The two most important things you must do with any shoe is to insert a properly fitting pair of quality wood shoe trees immediately upon removing them, and rotate your wearings of the shoe so that it has at least 3 days of rest between wearings. Beyond that, brush them often with a good horsehair buffing brush. You can put a little shoe cream on them infrequently also if you want a bit more shine, or need to cover up a scuff.
 
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