John M

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I wear khaki pants to work and honestly I prefer them to blue jeans. I have experimented with a number of brands of blue jeans but never selvage (hence why I made the selvage topic recently) so that option still remains.

I like the fit of this one company I am buying from which is called All American Khakis. I am going to try a 29" inseam on one pair that I order and then I will try a 28" if that is too long. Either way it is not like the pants will go to waste because I am wearing them with sneakers (my job is a casual retail job) so at worst all I might have to do is cuff them to avoid getting them too dirty.
 

Audi S5 TC

Advanced Member
⇧ All very good fit advice.

Ten or twenty years ago, I would have disagreed with you about 5'9" being short as, at 6'1", I used to be very tall, but over the last few decades, the Millennials have grown up and they are such a tall generation that they've shifted the scale.

I'd say I'm now "normal" to "modestly tall" as I regularly see Millennial men several inches taller than I. Even the women of that generation are taller as I almost never look eyeball to eyeball with a woman of my generation, but do so regularly with Millennial women.
Off topic, but Millenials are people born from 1981 to 1996.
 
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Fading Fast

Connoisseur
Off topic, but Millenials are people born from 1981 to 2000.
So they'd be 17 to 36 years old today. Am I missing the obvious? This seems consistent with my comments. Over the last two decades they've become adults and, being a taller generation, they've shifted the "scale" of what is "normal" height.
 

Charles Dana

Honors Member
I like the fit of this one company I am buying from which is called All American Khakis. I am going to try a 29" inseam on one pair that I order and then I will try a 28" if that is too long. Either way it is not like the pants will go to waste because I am wearing them with sneakers (my job is a casual retail job) so at worst all I might have to do is cuff them to avoid getting them too dirty.
Why not just order khakis that have a 32-inch inseam? Then when you receive them, wash and dry them twice. Then take them to an alterations tailor and have them hemmed precisely. A custom hem job is well worth the modest additional expense.
 

winghus

Super Member
Where are you buying the All Americans? Their website doesn't sell directly.


I wear khaki pants to work and honestly I prefer them to blue jeans. I have experimented with a number of brands of blue jeans but never selvage (hence why I made the selvage topic recently) so that option still remains.

I like the fit of this one company I am buying from which is called All American Khakis. I am going to try a 29" inseam on one pair that I order and then I will try a 28" if that is too long. Either way it is not like the pants will go to waste because I am wearing them with sneakers (my job is a casual retail job) so at worst all I might have to do is cuff them to avoid getting them too dirty.
 

SAM IAM

Starting Member
John,
Ive found that as I've aged and added some weight, my inseams are getting shorter. I was once a 33-34 length at the age of around 30 when I weighed around 140. Now, at the age of 70, and tipping the scale at a robust 195, I find that a 31 inseam frequently seems long.
Just an observation.
Since your limbs can not shrink anywhere but in the joints, you must have shrunk in your lower torsoe - something that I hadn't really considered. I figured that I might shrink as much as 2 inches, and end up back at the same 5'11 1/2" height with 35" inseam, while wearing the same 34" inseam pants that I had and wore in 11th grade. Well, I guess I will have the same inseam, but the pants length will end up fitting better, or be a little TOO long.
 

Audi S5 TC

Advanced Member
So they'd be 17 to 36 years old today. Am I missing the obvious? This seems consistent with my comments. Over the last two decades they've become adults and, being a taller generation, they've shifted the "scale" of what is "normal" height.
Contrary to what I originally thought, millennials were born from 1981 to 1996, which made them 21 to 36 in 2017 and 24 to 39 now.
 

John M

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Since this topic is bumped, I will say (although it is kind of well known now) that All American Khakis does have an e-commerce website now.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Back in the late 1960's I was a 30" waist and a 32" inseam. Today my inseam still measures 31", but my waist has grown to 40" (on bad days!). I guess I've grown, but haven't gotten any taller! LOL. ;)
 

Dhaller

Advanced Member
I try to keep my waist smaller than my inseam (32/34 at 6'1"), but that requires more and more attention as the years pass (will I really be 54 this year?)

My cardiologist advised to *never* buy larger clothes... if things start feeling tight (it happens, especially here in the Fried Everything Deep South), resist that temptation to size up, and *just suffer* (my heart is glitchy so I'm supposed to stay trim & tip-top, forever and ever, until as my very blunt cardiologist puts it "your heart finally kills you, because it will eventually, you just want to delay that as much as possible." :hi: )

That does tend to prompt one into action!

(I have a shirt I accidentally bought a size too small to wear comfortably, so I use it as a "test" when I think I'm fattening up too much - if I put it on and the fabric around the buttons puckers, it's time to hit the trail or gym harder. Better metric than any scale!)

DH
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I try to keep my waist smaller than my inseam (32/34 at 6'1"), but that requires more and more attention as the years pass (will I really be 54 this year?)

My cardiologist advised to *never* buy larger clothes... if things start feeling tight (it happens, especially here in the Fried Everything Deep South), resist that temptation to size up, and *just suffer* (my heart is glitchy so I'm supposed to stay trim & tip-top, forever and ever, until as my very blunt cardiologist puts it "your heart finally kills you, because it will eventually, you just want to delay that as much as possible." :hi: )

That does tend to prompt one into action!

(I have a shirt I accidentally bought a size too small to wear comfortably, so I use it as a "test" when I think I'm fattening up too much - if I put it on and the fabric around the buttons puckers, it's time to hit the trail or gym harder. Better metric than any scale!)

DH
My friend, I feel your pain. About 35 years ago, I had a very similar conversation with our family doctor. He essentially said if I didn't find better ways of managing the stress in my life, that I would be dead in five years or less. I've exercised pretty much all of my life and up until we moved to central Florida, I kept my weight right at the point is was when I graduated from college almost 50 years ago. The weight stayed pretty much the same, but in spite of all the exercise, the body composition changed...my waistline experienced a slow but consistent growth spurt:(. Today they have me on multiple blood pressure medications and they seem to be working. As a septuagenarian I'm feeling pretty good and hope to be around at least another decade or so! I hope to see the grand kids through college. May your life's journey be a long, joyful and prosperous one. ;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
I try to keep my waist smaller than my inseam (32/34 at 6'1"), but that requires more and more attention as the years pass (will I really be 54 this year?)

My cardiologist advised to *never* buy larger clothes... if things start feeling tight (it happens, especially here in the Fried Everything Deep South), resist that temptation to size up, and *just suffer* (my heart is glitchy so I'm supposed to stay trim & tip-top, forever and ever, until as my very blunt cardiologist puts it "your heart finally kills you, because it will eventually, you just want to delay that as much as possible." :hi: )

That does tend to prompt one into action!

(I have a shirt I accidentally bought a size too small to wear comfortably, so I use it as a "test" when I think I'm fattening up too much - if I put it on and the fabric around the buttons puckers, it's time to hit the trail or gym harder. Better metric than any scale!)

DH
Wow, that's not a lot of margin for error. I am (depending on the brand) a 31 or 32/33, and, at 56, have kept my weight (like Eagle) the same since college, which has required daily exercise (that increases every decade) and being thoughtful about my eating (and eating less daily as each decade passes).

Hence, it's taken a lot - a whole lot - to stay unchanged and I am lucky to have a basic tendency to stay thin, but still, I've done a lot to, effectively, do nothing more than run (harder) in place.

My dad (6'3", 220lbs) used the "I won't buy larger clothes" diet and it worked, but man did he get grumpier (he was always grumpy) when he had to cut back on eating.

And the last thing that helps me, I have neither the budget for, nor room to store, a second set of "heavy" clothes.

With our coop building's gym (a pedestrian affair in a dark basement room with exposed pipes and all of five older machines and some random weights) closed owing to the pandemic, I am now intimately familiar with all 15 flights of stairs in our building's "back" staircase. Good, but quite boring exercise that has kept my weight the same through the nightmare event.
 

Dhaller

Advanced Member
Wow, that's not a lot of margin for error. I am (depending on the brand) a 31 or 32/33, and, at 56, have kept my weight (like Eagle) the same since college, which has required daily exercise (that increases every decade) and being thoughtful about my eating (and eating less daily as each decade passes).

Hence, it's taken a lot - a whole lot - to stay unchanged and I am lucky to have a basic tendency to stay thin, but still, I've done a lot to, effectively, do nothing more than run (harder) in place.

My dad (6'3", 220lbs) used the "I won't buy larger clothes" diet and it worked, but man did he get grumpier (he was always grumpy) when he had to cut back on eating.

And the last thing that helps me, I have neither the budget for, nor room to store, a second set of "heavy" clothes.

With our coop building's gym (a pedestrian affair in a dark basement room with exposed pipes and all of five older machines and some random weights) closed owing to the pandemic, I am now intimately familiar with all 15 flights of stairs in our building's "back" staircase. Good, but quite boring exercise that has kept my weight the same through the nightmare event.
I am very, very fortunate to have a wife whose native preference is cooking very healthy, balanced meals (and a daughter who likes eating them) and who appreciates exercise and basic, outdoorsy physicality. Without such support, it would be VERY difficult (since I can scarcely drive by a donut or ice cream shop without a slight turn of the steering wheel...)

But still, I exercise two hours a day (in various mixes and formats), plus at least one Big Outing (like a hike, or a long cycling trip) weekly... which I enjoy, though the Georgia summer is starting to flew its biceps a bit!

DH
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I'm finding if I eat a late breakfast and an earlier dinner (1700 to 1730 hours), skipping lunch, I can avoid painful starvation and can still manage to drop a pound to a pound and a half per week. But alas, a holiday or a birthday or some other convenient excuse for eating crazy, quickly squanders my progress! SWMBO hasn't yet told me I'm too fat, but she has said she would like to see just a little less of me! :crazy: LOL.
 

cdavant

Advanced Member
Cheer up. We are all shrinking. I couldn't find a quick citation about leg length, but I can look at my trousers and see that as the waist shrinks, the legs get longer.

"How much do people shrink as they age?
Estimates vary, but on average people lose ¼ to ½ inch every decade after age 40 or 50, with losses increasing in later years, and women generally losing more than men. Research from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, for example, found that women lost an average of 2 inches between the ages of 30 and 70 (and just over 3 inches by age 80). Men lost a little more than 1 inch by age 70 (and 2 inches by 80). But averages hide wide variability: Some people lose an inch or more in a single decade, some shrink only after age 60 or 70, and a few don’t shrink at all.

Why do we shrink?
People lose height because the discs between the vertebrae in the spine dehydrate and compress. The aging spine can also become more curved, and vertebrae can collapse (compression fracture) due to loss of bone density (osteoporosis). Loss of muscle in the torso can also contribute to stooped posture. Even the gradual flattening of the arches of the feet can make you slightly shorter."
 
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