VincentC

Senior Member
I think the purpose of using a little water on the uppers is just to remove dirt, and not to disinfect. Shoe polish contains stuff like turpentine which probably kills a lot of germs. But you do have a point.Shoes do spend a lot of time on the ground and move promiscuously from area to area. It might be an uidea to 'glove up' prior to polishing.
Oh so something like kiwi shoe polish which i use probably kills a lot of germs. THats good to hear. Than i might forget about using saddle soap which seems a bit troublesome.

BTW for shoe longevity or good looking shoes, what would people say is the biggest important thing you can do for them.
For example would you say polishing them or using shoe trees would be the single most important thing for shoes if you had the choice.?
 

Hector Freemantle

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
Yes. I'd like to quantify exactly what 'good' means in terms of characteristics that determine length of service. Had I bottomless pocket I'd certainly look at the $600 and upwards dollar shoes rather than the $200 to $400 but I do feel that I'd be paying for detail and luxury not necessarily durability.
Just in case any of the posters on this thread are still around:

The Loake shoes that I referred to 12 years ago are still in service. Surprisingly, the best of a collection of five, a Thames from the 2nd tier Shoemaker range still look new. All topyed from day one.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Just in case any of the posters on this thread are still around:

The Loake shoes that I referred to 12 years ago are still in service. Surprisingly, the best of a collection of five, a Thames from the 2nd tier Shoemaker range still look new. All topyed from day one.
Thanks for the update, though I'm not surprised. Well looked after quality tends to stick around! 👍
 

richard warren

Senior Member
For many ordinary people, the definition of “high end”has changed. Things were once ordinary commonplace goods have become luxuries, so that high end now means sturdiness (say, Alden shoes) where it used to mean more refined or even delicate (I’m thinking of the thin soled Bally shoes I used to wear).
 

Gurdon

Moderator
I haven't forgotten.

Fifteen years ago I retired from a job that called for adult clothing. Where I now live, anything beyond Levi's and a work shirt is dressy. Nonetheless, weather permitting, I routinely wear leather dress shoes with Levi's and a chambray or flannel work shirt.

My first pair of Edward Green captoe oxfords in a light brown calf, after being resoled twice, is still part of the rotation. They look good and fit exceptionally well. They are at least 25 years old. I like them a lot, so I wear them more often than my other 15 or so pairs of adult shoes. They will probably outlast me.

Durability and value aside, wearing properly fitting, good looking leather shoes gives one much pleasure, and while a minor luxury, it is not ostentatious. It might be thought of as a perk that goes with having an office job.

Regards,
Gurdon

I think so, but it's often forgotten.
 

Hector Freemantle

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I haven't forgotten.

Fifteen years ago I retired from a job that called for adult clothing. Where I now live, anything beyond Levi's and a work shirt is dressy. Nonetheless, weather permitting, I routinely wear leather dress shoes with Levi's and a chambray or flannel work shirt.

My first pair of Edward Green captoe oxfords in a light brown calf, after being resoled twice, is still part of the rotation. They look good and fit exceptionally well. They are at least 25 years old. I like them a lot, so I wear them more often than my other 15 or so pairs of adult shoes. They will probably outlast me.

Durability and value aside, wearing properly fitting, good looking leather shoes gives one much pleasure, and while a minor luxury, it is not ostentatious. It might be thought of as a perk that goes with having an office job.

Regards,
Gurdon
Minor luxury. Spot on!
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
I have 45+ year old Allen Edmonds and 25+ year old Aldens still in rotation and on my shoe racks. Clearly the shoes are going to outlast me, so my response to the question asked at the beginning of this thread is...apparently forever! ;)
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
It's kinda hard to argue how long my 20+ year old Aldens have really lasted as, by the '90s, when I was buying the better shoes, etc., I was fortunate enough to be able to own several pairs of shoes, so none got worn everyday or every other day.

To be sure, the Aldens have held up really well, but again, saying a number years - in my case - doesn't reflect how hard or easy those years were on the shoes.

To that point, I bought a pair of Florsheim Imperials in 1986 - my first quality dress shoe - for the insanely expensive amount of ~$120 (same as Alden at the time, wish I had bought an Alden).

I wore those shoes every day for five or more years (no rotating, as I had nothing to rotate them with) and then, every other day for probably about five more. After that, they were worn a few times a week and, in later years, they became the "bad weather" shoe, so they took an even further beating.

All that, and with pretty good care - shoe trees, regular shines, sole/heals replaced when needed - they hung in for about 25 years, but were shot by then. The stitching was coming undone everywhere, the leather was wearing away and the inside was literally disintegrating (I did have the inside fixed up a bit a few times) and I finally had to say goodbye.

But kudos to Florsheim, I got way more than my $125 worth out of those shoes.
 

Dhaller

Advanced Member
The more pairs of high end shoes you own, the more "rotation" you'll have, and the longer they'll last.

So the spirit of thrift is best served by owning many, many pairs of high-end shoes.

Feel free to use this logic to explain purchases to spouses, etc.

In service,
DH
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
The more pairs of high end shoes you own, the more "rotation" you'll have, and the longer they'll last.

So the spirit of thrift is best served by owning many, many pairs of high-end shoes.

Feel free to use this logic to explain purchases to spouses, etc.

In service,
DH
Ahh . . . I've got it! :idea:
The more you spend, the more you save! :happy:
That's my kind of reasoning! :beer:
 

127.72 MHz

Advanced Member
There are "Higher end" and "High End" shoes,.....They can all be made to last for years with proper care.

But, I have several pairs that are 25-30 years old. A pair of Florsheim Imperial, model 97625, from about 1993 that Nick Valenti from B. Nelson has resoled two times. If you are familiar with these soles you can appreciate what that means.

They look far better than new.

This is a great site for learning about higher end American made Florsheim shoes.


here's some examples. (Not mine but very close to the same look)
images1.jpg
(Image: VCleat)
P1130314-1-1038x576.jpg
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Most important thing for extending the lifespan of a shoe is regimented use of shoe trees.
To the disciplined, regular use of shoe trees I would add not making a practice of wearing the shoes on consecutive days. Allow your shoes to rest at least a day and preferably two days between wearings! ;)
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.

IMPORTANT: BEFORE POSTING PLEASE CHECK THE DATE OF THE LAST POST OF THIS THREAD. IF IT'S VERY OLD, PLEASE CONSIDER REGISTERING FIRST, AND STARTING A NEW THREAD ABOUT THIS TOPIC.