DaveInPhilly

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
262
My first pair of leather soled shoes has begun to develop a hole at the ball of my right foot. I was wondering if it would be worth while to have them resoled or if I should just start shopping. Forgive me for not knowing the terminology but these are not the type of sole that show the stiching, they have a flat surface all the way across - I take it this means they are glued. I don't know if that effects the repair.
 

tabasco

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
461
Italy
emila romagna
bologna
recent transaction

I just paid $44 for new Vibram rubber soles on my shoes. I elected these over the leather as I walk frequently in all weathers. Shoes were AE MacNeill Shell Cordovan .
Michael
 

Teacher

Honors Member
3,966
United States
North Dakota
Grand Forks
If they're glued, they can be resoled by a good cobbler, but I don't know that they're worth it. That's up to you. Where I live, my (very good) cobbler charges $50 for full soles and heels on welted shoes; that includes a hidden chanel.
 

augustin

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
155
United States
ny
Ithaca
$46 here in upstate NY for new soles and heels on my 'weejuns. No hidden channel though. I'll have to ask my cobbler what an extra four bucks will get me.
 

PJC in NoVa

Connoisseur
5,875
My first pair of leather soled shoes has begun to develop a hole at the ball of my right foot. I was wondering if it would be worth while to have them resoled or if I should just start shopping. Forgive me for not knowing the terminology but these are not the type of sole that show the stiching, they have a flat surface all the way across - I take it this means they are glued. I don't know if that effects the repair.

A lack of visible stitching doesn't necessarily mean that they're glued soles, but if they're cheaper shoes they probably are.

These probably aren't worth resoling.

Shoes constructed with Goodyear welts--which sometimes but not always have a row of visible stitches around the sole--can readily be resoled. The Church's shoe shop in DC charges $75 for the service, which is not done on the premises. The DC Alden Shop on K Street charges $125 for Alden's "restoration" service which involves resoling and other repairs/refurbishments as needed, all done at the Alden factory in New England.

These kinds of charges are reasonable when you're talking about giving new life to shoes that cost over $250 (and sometimes a good deal more) when new.

If you're committed for whatever reason to less expensive, nondescript shoes like the kind you can find at Marshall's or Syms (this is not a knock, BTW), I'd recommend just tossing them as they wear down and buying new ones.
 
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