Semper Jeep

Senior Member
950
United States
Michigan
Bloomfield Hills
If you only want to go to Canada or other North American countries, you could instead get a passport card. It's a little cheaper.
https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passports/apply-renew-passport/card.html
This is what my parents use
Is a passport now required for a US citizen to pass through Ontario? :icon_scratch: We didn't used to have to do that!
As UteLawyer mentioned, you can use a "passport card" and that's what my parents have used for a few years now without issue. I occasionally travel internationally for work though so I'll just stick to the traditional passport.

FWIW, I don't think I've ever once been asked for my passport when going into Canada, it's only the CBP on the American side who ever want to see it.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
30,497
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
^^
I guess with the current geopolitical realities, to include the threat of international terrorism, I can appreciate the changes, but was just surprised, given my experiences in the early 1980's. To be honest, I reflect longingly on "the good old days!" ;)
 

mlenecare

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
119
United States
illinois
lemont
Wow, what a great place. It was overwhelming - there was so much stuff just on the main floor. Ethan and the crew were great in helping me try on a large list of items. I happened to be in Erie, PA and the 4 hour round trip drive was totally worth it.

I’ve been pondering buying another suit. I’d love to hear thoughts on the fit. It seems to fit well off the rack with the normal adjustments. I wasn’t sure if the shoulders were boxy or not.




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This is my first post so I feel like this is a strange time to chime in but, as I’m reading this I’m waiting to get on a flight to Erie, Pa right now and this thread is Making me considering making the drive.

Long time lurker first tome poster. Good to finally say hello.
 

never behind

Senior Member
823
United States
IN
Zionsville
This is my first post so I feel like this is a strange time to chime in but, as I’m reading this I’m waiting to get on a flight to Erie, Pa right now and this thread is Making me considering making the drive.

Long time lurker first tome poster. Good to finally say hello.
Less than 2 hour drive. Pretty easy. I felt it was well worth it!


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TKI67

Super Member
1,218
United States
Texas
Austin
Thank you for the photos and you/they are right, there is definitely a method to their madness.

I try to make it out there once a year or so (this reminds me that I need to renew my passport so I can cut through Ontario and head back over there again soon) and I was definitely overwhelmed on my first trip there about a decade ago but you can ask for anything and they immediately know where to find it, even old deadstock stuff that you might be looking for.

I've never been to Cable Car Clothiers in San Francisco but I imagine it to have a similar, maybe less cluttered, vibe as O'Connell's.
It has been many years since I was in Cable Car Clothiers, but it was, at the time, very sedate and orderly, more like a Brooks Brothers of the late seventies.
 

Redasp

Starting Member
1
United States
KS
Wichita
This is the best trad/classic store in the U.S. So much stock in the store and knowledge with John and Ethan. I’ve been going there one day a year for the past 8 years when I’m in Buffalo on business. John and Ethan always know me on sight even though I’m a small sale and there 1 day a year. Always so much fun talking with the guys and watching John jerk trouser after trouser out from under the stacks. Quality investment goods that are unavailable elsewhere. Please don’t ever repair the cane chair in the dressing room.
 

JLibourel

Honors Member and King Fop
5,994
United States
California
Long Beach
Even though I hate traveling with a passion, those pictures of O'Connell's makes me somewhat rueful that I will never get to Buffalo.

I have to wonder how much longer a wonderful men's store like that can last.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
22,054
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
Even though I hate traveling with a passion, those pictures of O'Connell's makes me somewhat rueful that I will never get to Buffalo.

I have to wonder how much longer a wonderful men's store like that can last.
As long as we keep buyin'! :happy:

But seriously, having had some experience with business succession, your concerns are well placed. Smaller businesses such as O'Connell's rarely survive beyond their second generation of ownership, and more typically, past their first.

The nature of the original ownership is critical in influencing this, and most such businesses are either sole proprietorships or partnerships. The first generation has the vision and the energy, but for the second its old-hat, and due to the first generation's success, they find themselves less willing to make the personal sacrifices needed to run the business in the same way.

For example, a man has a business, his sons who were brought into the business as partners inherit it. The business is situated in valuable real estate they own. One son wants to continue the business as is, the other wants to cash out the real estate and do something else.

Alternately, some business not only succeed, but grow during subsequent ownership. These then can become victims of their success by becoming targets of capital partnerships who mainly just wish to exploit the name. I.e., Jos A Bank.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,523
United States
New York
NY
⇧ New York City loses many small, family businesses to the real estate "cash out" every year and, sad as I am to see them go, you can't blame the owners.

Just last year, we lost a ~100 year old German bakery that was very successful (very busy all the time), but the two great grandsons (I think I have the right generation) wanted to retire and, while there was a niece who wanted to take over, the grandsons needed to sell the real estate to have money to retire.

They looked into having the niece take a mortgage out to pay the grandsons, but then she couldn't make the economics of the business work as it wasn't profitable enough to come close to covering the proposed mortgage.

To be honest, the economics of the business weren't really working for, probably, decades in that the owners (the grandsons) could have stopped working 12+ hour days /6 days a week years ago by either selling the building and investing the money or renting the building out to another business at a market-rate rent.

In either case, they'd have made more than they did running the bakery. In truth, they were losing money every year they kept the bakery open versus what they could have made selling (and investing the proceeds) or renting the building out. The bakery (and all its hard work) was, effectively, a hobby.

It's a shame, but the "downside" to New York City (and many areas) massive rally in real estate over the past decades has been to price small businesses out of the city.
 
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Flanderian

Connoisseur
22,054
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
⇧ New York City loses many small, family businesses to the real estate "cash out" every year and, sad as I am to see them go, you can't blame the owners.

Just last year, we lost a ~100 year old German bakery that was very successful (very busy all the time), but the two great grandsons (I think I have the right generation) wanted to retire and, while there was a niece who wanted to take over, the grandsons needed to sell the real estate to have money to retire.

They looked into having the niece take a mortgage out to pay the grandsons, but then she couldn't make the economics of the business work as it wasn't profitable enough to come close to covering the proposed mortgage.

To be honest, the economics of the business weren't really working for, probable, decades in that the owners (the grandsons) could have stopped working 12+ hour days /6 days a week years ago by either selling the building and investing the money or renting the building out to another business at a market-rate rent.

In either case, they'd have made more than they did running the bakery. In truth, they were losing money every year they kept the bakery open versus what they could have made selling (and investing the proceeds) or renting the building out. The bakery (and all its hard work) was, effectively, a hobby.

It's a shame, but the "downside" to New York City (and many areas) massive rally in real estate over the past decades has been to price small businesses out of the city.
Fascinating! Thank you! I hadn't fully considered the role that real estate appreciation plays in the destruction of some wonderful small businesses.

I am currently reading Ron Chernow's very extensive and enjoyable biography of Alexander Hamilton. I had not had any idea of the extent to which he personally created the American economic system.

And in discussions or debates about the desirability of this system, I find views defending it as being composed of the immutable principles of the universe handed-down on tablets; the adherence to which is tantamount to religious observance, and the questioning of which is spitting in the face of God. And, of course, it's nothing of the kind. Hamilton was well aware when he created much of the underpinnings of this system of the problems inherent in it, and the need to intervene in its functioning, or modify it, in circumstances where it is proving destructive.