If you could bring back one thing...

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Super Member
1,624
Atlanta, Georgia
United States
Georgia
Atlanta
Two things I would like to see...

A return of the Ted Williams line of Sears sporting goods, or at least a line of the same quality and price point. I have owned several vintage TW items and they are practically indestructible. I have a mint blaze orange padded field coat I have displayed on AAAC before that my uncle bought in the early 70s and only wore a few times.

For the second that I would like to see again....when I was in high school, I was a devotee of The Preppy Handbook. Therefore, I wore BBS OCBD and madras shirts over Lacoste polo shirts almost every day with the Lacoste collar popped. I was soooo cool. My mom hated the additional laundry.

Cheers,

BSR
 

irish95

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
226
United States
Illinois
Waukegan
I wore the same style myself B Scott. About !/2 the time I would wear the collars down. I used to catch some serious "crap" from some of my friends for the look. All these years later, I think they were right.
 

Howard

Connoisseur
15,569
United States
New York
Bayside
Howard, I hope your dad makes a full and speedy recovery. My best wishes to him, to your mom, and to you.

He's fine now, we now just have to cut back on things such as drinking more water/seltzer, and less sodas, low fat this low salt that low sugar or no sugar at all.
 

challer

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
301
United States
Virginia
Alexandria
I love it, too. Towards the end of summer I’ll make one to be aging for the holidays. Fruitcake that has aged several years, with Amontillado being spooned over it at regular intervals, is wonderful.
We make fruitcake every year. Generally much better than store bought
 

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Super Member
1,624
Atlanta, Georgia
United States
Georgia
Atlanta
I enjoy exploring the psychology of men’s fashion. An action so innocuous as popping the collar on a polo shirt can completely change ones view of the wearer. It is such a small thing, but the wearer goes from virtually invisible to clearly obnoxious simply by flipping up his collar. Does a woman with a popped collar elicit a similar response?

In retro terms, 1980s-90s television almost always portrayed the popped collar guy as an elitist douche bag. It was an immediate identifier of jerkdom. This perception remains as far as I can tell. How did this hatred become so engrained? Did Holden Caulfield sport a popped collar in “Catcher in the Rye”? Is there some evolutionary trigger?

A young man sporting an ascot often gets the same reaction where an elderly gent in the same does not. These subtle but strongly held biases are fascinating to me.

Cheers,

BSR
 

TKI67

Senior Member
895
United States
Texas
Austin
I enjoy exploring the psychology of men’s fashion. An action so innocuous as popping the collar on a polo shirt can completely change ones view of the wearer. It is such a small thing, but the wearer goes from virtually invisible to clearly obnoxious simply by flipping up his collar. Does a woman with a popped collar elicit a similar response?

In retro terms, 1980s-90s television almost always portrayed the popped collar guy as an elitist douche bag. It was an immediate identifier of jerkdom. This perception remains as far as I can tell. How did this hatred become so engrained? Did Holden Caulfield sport a popped collar in “Catcher in the Rye”? Is there some evolutionary trigger?

A young man sporting an ascot often gets the same reaction where an elderly gent in the same does not. These subtle but strongly held biases are fascinating to me.

Cheers,

BSR
I can’t speak to all polos, but I can attest to the fact that aging Lacostes have collars that tend to stiffen and wrinkle in odd and annoying ways. At a certain point it as if the shirt, not the wearer, selects the pop effect, and it’s a small effort to make the collar lie down!
 

challer

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
301
United States
Virginia
Alexandria
Our Family is trying to cut down on everything that has a ton of salt and that includes soups and TV Dinners cause soups these days from what we had read on the labels contain close to 1,000 or 500-1,000mg of salt, that was astounding! So we need to have Low Salt, Low Sugar and Low Fat since My Father had a heart attack a few weeks ago.

Very sorry to hear about your father. Now, try making your own soup - simple, cheap, delicious, and super healthy if you avoid the cream soups. Almost any clear broth soup can absorb loads of kale or spinach that you'll never notice but benefit from. Making your own broth from bones gives one control over sodium.
 

New Old Stock

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
133
United States
New York
New York
An action so innocuous as popping the collar on a polo shirt can completely change ones view of the wearer. It is such a small thing, but the wearer goes from virtually invisible to clearly obnoxious simply by flipping up his collar.
Not sure if it was ever done before the '80s, but the Abercrombie & Fitch surfer look (cargo shorts, flip flops, puka shell necklace...) in the early aughts & the Jersey Shore cast look (Ed Hardy everything, fake tan...) some years later both wore the popped collar. They knew the obnoxious label that came with it & wore it as a badge of honor.

I will pop the collar on my polo when I am playing golf, but only during sunny midday rounds. I also wear pants instead of shorts. Ive never had anyone comment on the collar, but the pants get a ton of comments.
 

TKI67

Senior Member
895
United States
Texas
Austin
Howard, all the best for your father and the whole family. Making the dietary changes you have described will be an adventure, and I’m sure you will have many sources of support and advice. Low sodium but still delicious cooking is quite attainable. If you want any ideas or easy recipes, feel free to message me.
 

peterc

Super Member
1,257
United States
california
san francisco
I will limit my response to things I once had, or still have but that no longer fit, or things I should have bought but didn't when I had the chance.

1. A corduroy/suede/wool Invertere Squire coat like my dad bought for me at
Edward Chapman in Vancouver in 1975.

2. 2 or 3 Made in France Calvin Klein suits and sportcoats like I bought at
Saks and Robinson's circa 1977-1982.

3. 2 or 3 more half zip long sleeve cotton mock/turtlenecks like I bought at
Parachute in Soho in 1986/87.

4. 2 or 3 more Made in France Agnes B. suits like the one I bought in L.A. in
1994.

5. 2 or 3 more pair of the Bally Cymbal slip on that my mom bought for me
on Rodeo Drive in June 1983.

6. The tweed Polo Ralph Lauren overcoat that Woody Allen wore in Hannah
and Her Sisters.