Flanderian

Connoisseur
⇧ This made me chuckle. Back in the '80s, for the first few years of my post-college career, before I could afford to move into NYC, I commuted from an elevated NJ train platform.

Standing on that platform in January at 5:30am, I needed every ounce of overcoat that I could afford. I used to, literally, hold the arm holes of my coat closed with my gloved hands to keep the wind from coming in through the sleeves. Some mornings were insane.

But since then, and to your point, I have almost never really needed a heavy weight overcoat, but have always owned one anyway.
It was during a couple years of train commuting that I too became intimately familiar with the thermal properties of various overcoat configurations! :D
 

delicious_scent

Super Member
⇧ This made me chuckle. Back in the '80s, for the first few years of my post-college career, before I could afford to move into NYC, I commuted from an elevated NJ train platform.

Standing on that platform in January at 5:30am, I needed every ounce of overcoat that I could afford. I used to, literally, hold the arm holes of my coat closed with my gloved hands to keep the wind from coming in through the sleeves. Some mornings were insane.

But since then, and to your point, I have almost never really needed a heavy weight overcoat, but have always owned one anyway.
I only recently learned about train platforms and how terrible they are for keeping warm.

The coldest I've been was on my trip to Amsterdam in 2019 Spring. It was 50F and windy, and I only brought an OCBD, a scarf, and my fatigue jacket.

It gets cold here, but public transport is borderline non-existent, so everyone just goes directly from a car to indoors. 10 minute walk at worst.

I can't imagine how frigid it would be on a train platform in an elevated NJ train platform in January. I shivered just thinking about it.

I'd definitely keep a heavy overcoat if I lived in NYC.
Yes, judging only from the photo, and given my preferences, I'd like it best for general purposes.

The heavy tweed is really a wrap coat, and most likely is secured only by one button, as you suggest. Many DB's are also cut with a peak, rather than a notch lapel like this one. I like both.

I don't find belted DB's too busy, but in a coat that's intended to optimize formality, I feel it makes it less so.

A Raglan shoulder and Balmacan collar are both less formal that either a conventional notch lapel, or peak lapel. And as such, I agree they fit most naturally with less formal clothing beneath.
Alright, sounds good. Maybe a teal blue in the future, but better to have something versatile for once. I'm easily distracted by shiny menswear items that don't end up being very useful.

Being a wrap coat makes sense on why I prefer that silhouette.

Agreed on a belted DB being less formal.


That's the example that came to mind for looking too busy, but it may be due to the button configuration+belt. That example I think would look better with half-belt at the back.
 
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