EponymousFunk

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
148
Washington Beltway
United States
DC
Washington
...I prefer no break, though so long as not pooling and of a crisp drape, fine with it. Never understood looking like you were wearing your older Brother's pants or suit.
I cannot cite an authoritative source, but U.S. military services as far back as I can remember specify tailoring trousers to a “slight break” (at least, that’s what the tailors would insist upon). Perhaps this is a source for such preferences (to my eye, it looks “right” even now).

In that vein, I recall also being given to believe a jacket sleeve’s proper length is defined by the line parallel to the ground and across the back of one’s hand at the thumb knuckle...sheer madness, that one...

Regards,
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
702
United States
AZ
Mesa
I cannot cite an authoritative source, but U.S. military services as far back as I can remember specify tailoring trousers to a “slight break” (at least, that’s what the tailors would insist upon). Perhaps this is a source for such preferences (to my eye, it looks “right” even now).

In that vein, I recall also being given to believe a jacket sleeve’s proper length is defined by the line parallel to the ground and across the back of one’s hand at the thumb knuckle...sheer madness, that one...

Regards,
Once again military influences civi clothing, interesting.

Wonder if no break more casual?

Seems to me coat sleeve length also varied over time. In times past, very slight, and on Opa's, I leave it that way as don't want to risk damage.

Now on shirts, after my growth spurt, too short. When replace, going for unbuttoned comes that long though when buttoned just rests on the hand. That help to show shirt on the aforementioned coats and if does shrink a little, not going to be noticeable.
 

John M

New Member
77
United States
New Jersey
Eatontown
Interesting...

As far as I know, today's modern HE washers have lower temps for warm water. It is nowhere near 100, probably around 80. I actually never experienced shrinkage on my 100% cotton pants even when using the hot setting at the local laundromat which is scalding. It could be because I sometimes size up on what I normally wear and allow it to shrink in.
 

TKI67

Super Member
1,218
United States
Texas
Austin
My recollection of the USN is that bell bottoms had a full break. For officers both khakis and whites had either minimal or no break. Officers’ blues were all over the place. I hear that khakis are no more. The Navy’s Armstrong washers (no temperature selection) never shrank anything. That was quickly rendered irrelevant as you got out of either boot camp or OCS and could have your laundry done.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
702
United States
AZ
Mesa
Interesting...

As far as I know, today's modern HE washers have lower temps for warm water. It is nowhere near 100, probably around 80. I actually never experienced shrinkage on my 100% cotton pants even when using the hot setting at the local laundromat which is scalding. It could be because I sometimes size up on what I normally wear and allow it to shrink in.
I have a Fluke meter with thermocouple temperature probe so can test it (bought as needed it for classwork and future uses knowing a fine investment). Never thought to do so. How I set my refrigerator temperature to 34*F (shut the door and left it for a few cycles) and check how the aircon is working.

How long have you been washing on hot?

Has the length remained the same as when bought?

If high quality, then the waistband is perpendicular to the grain and will not shrink indifferent than the rest of the garment:https://fashion-incubator.com/yet_another_pet_peeve_waistbands/. Myself only now aware of this and how much can shrink.


My recollection of the USN is that bell bottoms had a full break. For officers both khakis and whites had either minimal or no break. Officers’ blues were all over the place. I hear that khakis are no more. The Navy’s Armstrong washers (no temperature selection) never shrank anything. That was quickly rendered irrelevant as you got out of either boot camp or OCS and could have your laundry done.
Thank you for your service. By the way, my Opa was a Merchant Marine and then sailor during World War Two plus my Uncle by marriage is also a sailor served in Nam.

All this time been wearing my bell bottoms and flares wrong. Good to know, though not sure anyone else be aware.

When would sailors wear chinos? I thought whites were always worn on ship except when dress blues required.

Checked the picture I have of my Uncle in officers' blues and about 1/4 to 1/2" above the vamp (old and dark picture).
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
30,087
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
I cannot cite an authoritative source, but U.S. military services as far back as I can remember specify tailoring trousers to a “slight break” (at least, that’s what the tailors would insist upon). Perhaps this is a source for such preferences (to my eye, it looks “right” even now).

In that vein, I recall also being given to believe a jacket sleeve’s proper length is defined by the line parallel to the ground and across the back of one’s hand at the thumb knuckle...sheer madness, that one...

Regards,
Actually a trouser design titled 'a West Point cut' features a rather pronounced break and frequently, when taken to the extreme, includes some pooling of the trouser legs on top of the shoes and behind the heels of the shoe(s). To my eye, it is aterrible look
 

TKI67

Super Member
1,218
United States
Texas
Austin
I have a Fluke meter with thermocouple temperature probe so can test it (bought as needed it for classwork and future uses knowing a fine investment). Never thought to do so. How I set my refrigerator temperature to 34*F (shut the door and left it for a few cycles) and check how the aircon is working.

How long have you been washing on hot?

Has the length remained the same as when bought?

If high quality, then the waistband is perpendicular to the grain and will not shrink indifferent than the rest of the garment:https://fashion-incubator.com/yet_another_pet_peeve_waistbands/. Myself only now aware of this and how much can shrink.




Thank you for your service. By the way, my Opa was a Merchant Marine and then sailor during World War Two plus my Uncle by marriage is also a sailor served in Nam.

All this time been wearing my bell bottoms and flares wrong. Good to know, though not sure anyone else be aware.

When would sailors wear chinos? I thought whites were always worn on ship except when dress blues required.

Checked the picture I have of my Uncle in officers' blues and about 1/4 to 1/2" above the vamp (old and dark picture).
In my time sailors wore whites, blues, and dungarees. Officers had whites, blues, and khakis. You were nice to thank me, but I was only a reservist and got a medical discharge for sports injuries. My dad and granddad were career naval officers.
 

Adriel Rowley

Senior Member
702
United States
AZ
Mesa
In my time sailors wore whites, blues, and dungarees. Officers had whites, blues, and khakis. You were nice to thank me, but I was only a reservist and got a medical discharge for sports injuries. My dad and granddad were career naval officers.
Then I thank your Dad and Grandfather.

My Great Grandfather was career Army, serving in the trenches of France during World War One and Engineer Corps designing and over seeing building bases in Nebraska, Los Angles, and Camp La Jolla, then Reserves during Korea. I do remember him, stoic though warm and wonderful dry sense of humor.

Dr. Seuss, is that you?
Bwahahahahaha. The syntax in those posts are one thing, but this takes it next-level.
I didn't even see it when writing it, then wondering what Charles was getting at, then finally hit me reading smmrfld's post. :laughing:

Maybe I do have an ability with works like some folks claim. :p
 
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