ChicagoTrad

Senior Member
599
United States
Illinois
Chicago
Hopefully never ;) However there are some things I've gotten rid of:

* There are several things that I have dropped simply because they weren't as stylish as I thought initially and I later recognized them as mistakes! (e.g., a DKNY jacket from linen with funky snaps)

* Some wool slacks for business casual have worn out for me, but only after about 10 years of hard use and many dry cleanings. These were worn hard and more often before I knew how to care for wool clothes.

* 2 suits because I gained weight over a 10 year period and there was no material to expand them.

* one suit bought when I left college. It would be way too small now, but I poked a hole in the leg somehow, but knowing what I know now it could have been repaired pretty easily. The only other suit that is close to being torn up enough to toss is a Navy Hugo Boss that is at least 10 years old. I used to wear it out to clubs a lot, and the wear is around the inside of the waist-band.

* I lost several cheap shoes before I knew to rotate. Once I learned to rotate, I can't think of a pair of dress shoes that I have worn out. I've dropped a couple because I realized they were cheap corrected-grain things.

* I'm in the middle of replacing a lot of my shirts now. I want to upgrade the quality and many of the ones I have are 5 - 10 years old now. I don't do anything special with them, though, light starch at the local cleaners.

Overall, one thing I do that is very helpful is to almost always change out of my nicer work clothes and/or suits before I do things like walking the dog. I grew up on a farm, so I know that having the right clothes for work is an important thing ;)
 

Pipps

Super Member
1,452
Wales
Cardiff
Cardiff
I suspect your body shape may change quicker than your clothing becomes unusable...
I am sorry, but that is simply not the case. Your logic is flawed. Your assumption is incorect. Your premise, untrue.

My body shape will not change for another forty years. And so with careful laundering, I should hope that my personally tailored clothing will last as long as I will!
 

JayJay

Super Member
1,025
I have a few items that are many years old. But on the other hand, every year I send a few garments to Goodwill or Salvation Army including shoes and suits that should not have been purchased in the first place due to quality, fit, or fashion. However, I've made better choices in recent months of items that I can't see replacing for many years.
 

Omega

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
259
Great Britain
England
City
I am sorry, but that is simply not the case. Your logic is flawed. Your assumption is incorect. Your premise, untrue.

My body shape will not change for another forty years. And so with careful laundering, I should hope that my personally tailored clothing will last as long as I will!
I guess you are lucky one – I don’t know people who had the same body when they were 20, 35 and later. I usually see that many people try to gain weight and muscles before age of 25, and after that age they try to fight weight gain…
 

Alexander Kabbaz

Tech and Business Advice Guru
6,675
United States
New York
East Hampton
However, your body shape changes with time – some put on weight, some lose it, even if you don’t change weight your body shape changes with age (the recommended weight is different for different age groups).
I guess you are lucky one – I don’t know people who had the same body when they were 20, 35 and later. I usually see that many people try to gain weight and muscles before age of 25, and after that age they try to fight weight gain…
In the bespoke trades, it is quite common for 70%-80% of clients to maintain the same basic size for decades. In many ways this can be one of the overarching mantras of those who appreciate fine clothing as you can see from Will's post above.

Though there is often a small change in shape beginning in the early 50's, it is not usually sufficient to require the discarding of previously bespoken clothing. It does mandate a pattern update for future work. The usual change is a bit of drooping in the shoulders and pectoral muscles. Depending upon magnitude, this will cause from a miniscule to a somewhat perceptable wrinkle from the yoke-collar-front joint out to the armhole. Easily corrected in suits; not alterable in shirts except at unjustifiable expense.

On your point regarding style, this can be of concern at times. I'm 57. I have a perfectly serviceable three-piece wool gabardine SB I got when I was 20-21. Fits fine ... but the stovepipe trousers do look a bit out-of-synch with the rest of the world.
 

a tailor

Honors Member
3,255
22 years ago i had a heart attack and a triple bypass. lost 40 pounds.
in 2 months i will be 80 and i weigh the same as when i was 18.
its like deja vou. sorry i cant spell it.
 

Pipps

Super Member
1,452
Wales
Cardiff
Cardiff
22 years ago i had a heart attack and a triple bypass. lost 40 pounds.
in 2 months i will be 80 and i weigh the same as when i was 18.
its like deja vou. sorry i cant spell it.
You are like a hero.

:icon_hailthee:

Seriously.
 

LondonFogey

Senior Member
524
I budget on the following rough guides, though of course a lot depends on cloth type:

Shirts: 3-4 years' wear worn once a week. Collar and cuffs start fraying at this point and shirt gets demoted to occasional use.

Midweight wool suits: (worn every other weekday) 3 years for 'best' then elbow and bum shine tends to become noticeable, demoted to occasional use for a further 2 years

Linen suits: 2-3 years worn every other week day May- September then trousers wear out - jacket still good for another 2 years or so (though I had a Cordings linen suit for about 8 years).

Sports jackets: if tweed, indefinite. Corduroy is shorter lived, so I'd estimate 5 years, though I recently retired one after 10 years.

Shoes: worn every other day, about 3 years for cheaper stuff like Loake's. Church's etc at least 5 years, though needing new soles and heels.

Jumpers: indefinite, at least 5 years as generally worn at weekends only.

Overcoats: 5 years for 'best' with another five or so 'shabby'.

Ties: varies, but I find the end of the blades starts fraying after 2-3 years.

Jeans: indefinite - 5-10 years. Chinos etc - 2-3 years especially if light coloured. Cord trousers - 5-10 years.

Casual stuff lasts longer as it only gets worn at weekends.
 

Ace_Face

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
179
I find that my shirts (all BB) tend to develop fraying at the cuff and collar points after a few years. However, I've recently acquired about a half dozen shirts to ease up on the frequency they are worn. But this thread brings up a few things I've been thinking of recently:

1) I've noticed that my favorite midweight wool suit is starting to develop a bit of a shine at the elbows. Is there any way to reverse or at least slow this process?

2) A few issues with shirts: any laundering tips to keep white shirts bright white? Mine tend to get a bit dull after 6 months or so. And I also am considering sending one of my white shirts to Maldonado's. The cuffs are starting to fray pretty badly but the rest of the shirt is fine. Would it make sense to put a white collar/cuffs on the white shirt? Or would there be a matching problem?
 
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