At Law

Senior Member
586
United States
Nebraska
Omaha
Good Evening,

As a result of moving to another city, I had temporarily put 90 percent of my clothing and shoes in storage.

The storage facility flooded and damaged everything I owned ( In essence).

I happen to be a lawyer, however, I retained another lawyer to represent me with my claim.

I am going to have a pocket full of cash, however, basically no clothing / shoes. Akin to a house fire.

We will eventually settle, however, I will have to start new with everything.

Where does one begin?
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,118
United States
New York
NY
I'm sorry that happened to you.

A similar thing happened to me when we were moving / renovating and I stored a good amount (~60%-70%) of my clothes in the basement of a building that had a fire. The clothes were ruined and insurance, eventually, sent me a decent check.

The difference for me was that I was also transitioning from working in an office to working at home for myself. So, while I lost a lot of really nice suits, sport coats, dress trousers, shirts and overcoats, the truth was, going forward, owing to my new work situation and the general shift to biz casual, I didn't really need to replace most of them. I still miss some key pieces, but it is what it is.

The silver lining is you can now replace the old clothes with exactly what you want at this time. I'd go slowly and, especially for biz clothes, buy less and buy better quality. I found throughout my life, that the 80%/20% rule applies to clothes - you wear 20% of your clothes 80% of the time and the rest get little use.

Hence, I've tried to be very selective in replacing my clothes - holding out for getting just what I want and buying the best quality I can. This way, I have fewer clothes, but better quality ones that I use more often. Good luck, I hope this helps a bit.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
30,117
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
Sorry to hear of your misfortune, At Law, but I do hope your claim is promptly and adequately settled and that you might possibly enjoy your quest to rebuild your sartorial windmill!

Take care and may you have a better day.
 

Patrick06790

Connoisseur
6,352
United States
Connecticut
Lakeville
I have a fantasy of walking into O'Connell's with a bulging bank account and saying "OK, let's start from scratch."

I didn't have a flood in the story, however. More like a publisher gave me an enormous advance. However...

I would proceed very deliberately. Here's a chance to have a manageable wardrobe of things that a) fit and b) were not purchased impulsively.

I think the first thing I'd do is get on the phone with David Mercer and get a whole mess of white and blue shirts...
 

cellochris

Super Member
1,573
United States
Massachusetts
Boston
The silver lining is you can now replace the old clothes with exactly what you want at this time. I'd go slowly and, especially for biz clothes, buy less and buy better quality. I found throughout my life, that the 80%/20% rule applies to clothes - you wear 20% of your clothes 80% of the time and the rest get little use.

Hence, I've tried to be very selective in replacing my clothes - holding out for getting just what I want and buying the best quality I can. This way, I have fewer clothes, but better quality ones that I use more often. Good luck, I hope this helps a bit.
I would proceed very deliberately. Here's a chance to have a manageable wardrobe of things that a) fit and b) were not purchased impulsively.
OP that stinks, but I agree with FF and Patrick, you have a real opportunity here. Purchase your core rotation (shirts/suits/jackets/pants) at the best quality and fit you can and fill in the rest at your leisure. The transition might be stressful but once you're back on your feet, I think you'll feel better.

Good luck,

-Chris
 

Troones

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
423
Canada
Ontario
Toronto
I found throughout my life, that the 80%/20% rule applies to clothes - you wear 20% of your clothes 80% of the time and the rest get little use.
Very very true in my experience. If I had to start all over, I would never do the quantity over quality for ties. I have a pile of cheap ties that I liked, until I invested in quality. I can't bring myself to wear the lesser quality ones now so I should pass them on.

Good advice to go slowly, be discerning and rebuild with exactly what you want, and more importantly, will have ample opportunities to use.
 

August West

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
421
United States
NJ
Northern
"In the midst of every crisis, lies great opportunity" My father used to say this to me quite a bit. Certainly not his original quote (Einstein?) but it sums up what has already been said in this thread.
Best of luck to you At Law.
 

Troones

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
423
Canada
Ontario
Toronto
"In the midst of every crisis, lies great opportunity" My father used to say this to me quite a bit. Certainly not his original quote (Einstein?) but it sums up what has already been said in this thread.
Best of luck to you At Law.
I motivate a group of insurance sales advisors for a living, and by a huge coincidence I used that quote for opening our last meeting. It was Einstein. And very applicable in the OP's situation.
 

At Law

Senior Member
586
United States
Nebraska
Omaha
Thank you all for your kind words and thoughts. That means the world to me.
I luckily held my suits out of storage, however, I couldn't get all of my shoes and casual clothing before the loss.

As I think about it, all of your words ring true.

I am going to take my time and build my wardrobe up with a lot less and a lot more quality. I had so many clothes and shoes that were exactly the same.

It is now time to buy high quality items and try not to duplicate. It will take time, however, it actually may be quite enjoyable.

Thank you again, gentlemen, for the kind words and support.

Tom
 
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