David Reeves

Inactive user
1,490
In Britain we have some decent military tailors are there any in the states? Has anyone got any photos?

Does/has anybody had a Bespoke uniform made for use in the U.S armed forces?
 

Vecsus

New Member
66
"Bespoke uniform" sounds like an oxymoron. I know I can speak for the US Air Force when I say that you must work with the items purchased from an authorized military clothing store. The only alterations you can have done are to the length of the pants and sleeves and those are established by regulations. No custom fabrics, cuts, darts, or other unique features are permitted.

Several times in my career I have had to reprimand subordinates for making unauthorized alterations to uniforms. Narrower leg openings, shorter skirts, and fabric type primarily. I once noticed that one of my troops had removed lower arm portion of his battle dress uniform and had the cuff sewn on so that it looked like his sleeves were rolled up.
 

Hobson

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
446
United States
New York
Long Beach
Bespoke uniforms were common a very long time ago. Officers were required to purchase their uniforms and companies like Brooks Brothers did a huge business. I'd venture to say so did a lot of the competition if you look in an older Howitzer, the West Point yearbook. I have a pretty large collection of Howitzers and the ads in the back for men's tailors, particularly in the 1920's were very nice.
 

Holdfast

Honors Member
4,007
"Bespoke uniform" sounds like an oxymoron.
Not at all! Bespoke (or at least custom-made) uniforms seem pretty common at least on this side of the pond for the dressier uniforms. And not just in the armed forces. A friend of mine was ship's doctor on a cruise liner for a while and was delighted to be able to get a custom-made, well-fitting uniform. The line said he could either go to an outfitters on the south coast somewhere, or alternatively I think they mentioned a couple of tailors who could do a more custom (and expensive) job. The tailors were all familiar with the required specifications of the line (or force) and worked within the proscribed details to create a uniform that fits properly.
 

DukeGrad

Super Member
1,939
MacArthur

Gentlemen,

Gen MacArthur was a dandy in dress for sure. He, out of regs designed his own stuff. I do believe was reprimanded by Eisenhower or to that effect.
I have served in 2 branches, Navy and Army. Retiring drom thye army.
I have never seen anything bespoke here in the US Military. The reason is thaton and near military bases there are tailors who know the regs.
I think in retrospect. Bespoke would have been nonsense.
The US military uniform looks great even when it looks ******!
Nice day gents
 

signal

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
104
"Bespoke uniform" sounds like an oxymoron. I know I can speak for the US Air Force when I say that you must work with the items purchased from an authorized military clothing store. The only alterations you can have done are to the length of the pants and sleeves and those are established by regulations. No custom fabrics, cuts, darts, or other unique features are permitted.

Several times in my career I have had to reprimand subordinates for making unauthorized alterations to uniforms. Narrower leg openings, shorter skirts, and fabric type primarily. I once noticed that one of my troops had removed lower arm portion of his battle dress uniform and had the cuff sewn on so that it looked like his sleeves were rolled up.
when I was in the USAF it was quite common for the ladies to have their fatigues taken in at the seat/crotch, to give them some shape to the rear end, not sure if that was authorized but alot did it.
 

David Reeves

Inactive user
1,490
"Bespoke uniform" sounds like an oxymoron. I know I can speak for the US Air Force when I say that you must work with the items purchased from an authorized military clothing store. The only alterations you can have done are to the length of the pants and sleeves and those are established by regulations. No custom fabrics, cuts, darts, or other unique features are permitted.

Several times in my career I have had to reprimand subordinates for making unauthorized alterations to uniforms. Narrower leg openings, shorter skirts, and fabric type primarily. I once noticed that one of my troops had removed lower arm portion of his battle dress uniform and had the cuff sewn on so that it looked like his sleeves were rolled up.
That's very interesting. I started thinking about this because I used to work for Gieves and they are an official military supplier, maybe this is how people getting Bespoke get around the regulations.

As I recall Paton "invented" a few uniforms.

What military suppliers are there in the states? If you are a 4 star General do you still have to buy off the rack?
 

David Reeves

Inactive user
1,490
Y'know what's also interesting about Military clothing is what people in the services wear off duty, there is certainly a look in England. I find short trousers on people: your either a bit trendy or an ex Guards officer!

Does anybody have any thoughts/comments on certain units or regiments wearing certain types of non uniform, "uniform" while off duty? The Guards in the past wearing Bowler hats and three piece suits is an obvious one are there any other things like that from around the world?
 

Vecsus

New Member
66
What military suppliers are there in the states? If you are a 4 star General do you still have to buy off the rack?
The primary supplier of military clothing seems to be the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP). There is at least one other supplier for US Air Force dress uniforms but I cannot recall the name. And I certainly can't speak for Generals but while I was stationed at the Pentagon I often saw them buying official items at the military clothing store there. Even if they have something made for them, it would still have to be with the same patterns and fabrics used in off-the-shelf items.

Uniforms are permitted to be altered to improve fit as long as they retain their intended appearance. In other words, you can tailor them but no one should be able to tell. The Air Force is the most liberal when it comes to uniform items. Get caught with an unauthorized item as a Marine and I dread to think what the punishment would be.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
32,300
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
^^Having spent 27 years (active and reserve duty), I purchased all my uniforms, except flight suits and missile combat crew uniforms, from the clothing sales store. I really cannot remember too many occasions on which the uniform purchases did not have to be tailored to provide a proper fit. Every base I was assigned to had a list of tailors, that knew how to do the work IAW regulations, at the Base cleaners. ;)
 

Relayer

Super Member
1,201
I always had my USAF uniform shirts tapered for a much better fit than off the rack ( I used to be a lean, mean, telecommunicating machine).

Also, every TI that I ever saw did the same +.
 

maxnharry

Super Member
1,243
United States
PA
Carlisle
I am US Navy and have had uniforms made in a number of places.

Abbott Military Tailors, Pensacola
Polidoro Tailors, Naples Italy
Johnson's On The Avenue, Annapolis

One can also order a Brooks Bros MTM measure uniform at the larger bases.
 

Blueboy1938

Advanced Member
2,548
United States
California
West Hollywood
Marines . . .

. . . must have their smashing crimson-lined boat cloaks constructed from scratch by a little old man at Quantico, I have just learned. I had my army dress blues tailor-made in Bad Nauheim, West Germany, but that obviously doesn't count, and it was in '62. Otherwise, I just got stuff from the PX.
 

Wyvern1138

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
152
One thing I never liked about the army was the polyester blend fabric of the Class As. I hated wearing them. I understand all-wool cavalry twill is currently authorized, but if it's not available OTR, I can see having a uniform made to spec if one could find a tailor that had the correct fabric.
 

helo-flyer

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
128
Brooks Brothers has actually become a standard issue uniform for the US Naval Academy (1 set of SDBs, i.e. db suit). Although, unfortunately we never did get the MTM version.
 

David Reeves

Inactive user
1,490
One thing I never liked about the army was the polyester blend fabric of the Class As. I hated wearing them. I understand all-wool cavalry twill is currently authorized, but if it's not available OTR, I can see having a uniform made to spec if one could find a tailor that had the correct fabric.

I am sure a smart tailor could track down that fabric.
 

graphei

New Member
28
United States
NY
Albany
A bit of a necropost

... but I'll be commissioning before the year is done and I kinda loathe the fact that i'll have to put mylar on my Brooks Brothers SDBs. Since the regulations only say 'gold thread' I was wondering if I could track down some gold bullion thread and have it used for my line stars, sleeve lacings and shoulder boards? :icon_smile_big:
 

Penang Lawyer

Senior Member
936
Rogers Peet made my uniforms when I was commissoned in 1958. Both Brooks Brothers and Rogers Peet had "a shop" for those at West Point. Brooks Uniform, no connection to BB, also made uniforms.
Gen. MacArthur outranked Gen Eisenhauser. At the time and maybe they still can General Officers could make a few changes. What you might have thought was Ike only wore two rows of ribbons wear as MacArthur would wear all his ribbons. Gen MacArthur was not rich his father Arthur was also a General and at one time was the commading officer of th US Army. Gen Douglas MacArthur never resigned and received his full salary until he died. His apartment at the Waldorf Astoria was only $400. per month. That is what Conrad Hilton charged him. He, President Hoover and the Duke of Windsor all lived in the same area of the Waldorf Towers.