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mikel

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Thought this would be of interest to our community here, and be a good subject of conversation.

Any thoughts on the following press release from Saville Row?

Any millennials, those 20-30 years old, who would care to comment?

Assuming the general membership here, I'd guess that more folks prefer to dress smart?

Millennials Dress Smart Despite Relaxed Dress Codes

New data suggests that millennials don’t always put fashion first, with over half wanting an enforced dress code within the office.

A recent survey by Savile Row Company, London-based tailors of fine shirts and suits, found that 76% of millennials are choosing smart clothing as their first choice within the workplace. What’s more, only around a third (34%) think their workplace colleagues dress smartly enough already and want an enforced dress code.

Millennials are choosing to dress smart despite relaxed office dress codes, with 77% believing those who dress smart are taken more seriously. They also see dressing smartly (28%) as more important than being perceived as fashionable (8%) and 56% say their office would benefit from having a smarter dress code.

It looks like professional office attire is back and Justin Grau, fashion expert and publisher of Aspiring Gentlemen, said: “If you work at a law firm, ad agency, or a more traditional workplace where it is expected to dress "Professionally" you should dress at least at the average dress level and probably slightly above average.

I do think the management and clients look at this and put a big weighting on your professionalism and even job knowledge based on your attire.”

Millennials Like Tailoring

Even though more businesses are giving people the freedom to dress how they prefer, tailored clothing is making a comeback and millennials are embracing smarter attire.

Jeffrey Doltis, Owner of The Savile Row Company said “Although historically our demographic has been the 35 plus male, we are seeing more purchases on our online store from the 25 – 34-year-old age group. For us, tailoring is timeless and a good suit can make the wearer feel and look great at any age”.
 

Fading Fast

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Interesting - and thank you for posting - but "a survey by Savile Row Company" makes be wonder about bias - intentional or not. I'd like to believe it, but I think it leans heavily toward what a Savile Row company would want or what it would see by the fact that its clients have self selected into dressing well / traditional by choosing a Saville Row tailor.
 

JLibourel

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Isn't the term "smart" rather vague in this context? I can recall a woman of my acquaintance saying of some garment, "It's not pretty but it's terribly smart." This would have been close to 70 years ago, and I'm still not quite sure of the meaning.
 

Dhaller

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I am surrounded by Millennial creatives, and while I'd hardly say they dress "smart" in the traditional sense, they do *dress*, meaning they have a sense of style and put some effort into their presentation... it's a far cry from the sloppy "jeans & untucked button down" of just a few years ago.

DH
 
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mikel

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@Fading Fast - I tend to agree with you about the objective and/or bias of the press release.

Generally speaking, I think press releases are mostly garbage.

Though, I did find this one interesting, so I thought I'd share it nonetheless for discussion-sake.
 

smmrfld

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I am surrounded by Millennial creatives, and while I'd hardly say they dress "smart" in the traditional sense, they do *dress*, meaning they have a sense of style and put some effort into their presentation... it's a far cry from the sloppy "jeans & untucked button down" of just a few years ago.

DH
Agree completely. The millennial-bashing has become quite tiresome.
 

Fading Fast

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@Fading Fast - I tend to agree with you about the objective and/or bias of the press release.

Generally speaking, I think press releases are mostly garbage.

Though, I did find this one interesting, so I thought I'd share it nonetheless for discussion-sake.
Glad you did - as you note, still interesting. Living in NYC, I see a lot of Millennials in suits and ties - and most of those that are, bring some style to it (even if it is within the parameters of the very skinny fashion of the moment).

Since wearing a suit and tie is, for the most part, not forced or the social norm today as it was of old, those Millennials that do find their way to suits probably care how they look since, most of the time, it is a choice not a requirement. Maybe as they age - and skinny becomes, um, more challenging - they'll gravitate to more classic cuts and fits.
 

donquexada

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I don't know what 'smart' means in this context. In my experience, millennials conflate dressing professionally with dressing for the club.
 

Dhaller

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I don't know what 'smart' means in this context. In my experience, millennials conflate dressing professionally with dressing for the club.
Not my experience at all.

I don't know any Millennials who "go to the club"; specialty bars and craft beer places are more their speed.

The Gen Xers were the ones who went "clubbing". To this day, it's the aging Gen Xer you see with a black suit, square toed shoes, and a ridiculous and greying gel-spiked hair style.

My office is in a pretty trendy space with a lot of creative and tech companies (Twitter, Spotify, Pinterest, and Buzzfeed all have offices on my floor), and we have the ubiquitous open conversation/coffee area with coffee bar, piles of keto energy bars and avocados, and local craft beers and boozes, and the Millennial set mostly wear trousers (I never see jeans anymore), button-down shirts, lots of vests and bow ties. Lots of beards. We do have a bunch of women in high-end yoga attire (one of the companies here is a private equity group focused on yoga and related lifestyle and apparel, and if staffed mostly by incredibly fit women - I depend on them to ward off any shooters with Pilates-fueled roundhouse kicks); frankly, I can't complain.

Yes, things are too short and too fitted, but it's a coherent style. And really, "professional" is more about "correct" than a specific style: attending an impromptu pitch session in a suit and tie would make one look lost, not professional. Time and a place, as has always been so.

DH
 

TheBarbaron

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My evidence is influenced by selection bias (young men who put effort into their wardrobe are much more likely to show up at my job then those who don't), but I have seen a gradual uptick over the last ~5 years of those who dress well because they enjoy it, or because they don't like the super casual office.
 
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