medwards

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In another thread, english gent reminded me of some of the changes that took place in London fashion and tailoring in the mid-1960's. One of the most styish and influential participants in this transition was Michael Fish, who brought his 60s peacock style to Clifford Street in 1966. His tailoring shop (Mr. Fish) had a rather noteworthy client base of royals and pop stars and became somewhat of a temple for those seeking the colourful, individualistic styles of the new era. While he is most often remembered the designer and shirtmaker who previously had updated (if not transformed) Turnbull & Asser with fitted shirts and his "kipper" ties, he remains one of the inspirational leaders of the peacock revolution. Any information on what became of Mr Fish would be most appreciated.
 
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Alan

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Thats not the same Michael Fish who is a weather presenter on UK TV channels?
 

medwards

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No. But inasmuch as this is a fashion forum, I will add that that Michael Fish was named both Worst Dressed Man on Television and then Best Dressed Man on Television. :icon_smile_big:
 

bengal-stripe

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Any information on what became of Mr Fish would be most appreciated.
I don’t think anyone knows.

Last year London’s Victoria & Albert Museum had an exhibition of London fashion in the ‘Swinging 60s”. Although it was mainly women’s stuff (lots of Ossie Clarke or Thea Porter), there were some menswear items as well. If I remember correctly, Mr Fish was represented with a ’psychedelic’ suit, made in multi-coloured striped (upholstery) velvet.

Whereas all the other designers were listed with their year of birth (and if necessary, year of death), there were no biographical entries for Mr Fish. I believe, the curators would have tried to get that data and I can only presume, they were not able to find it.
 

Leon

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Hardy Amies briefly describes him as the "high priest" of the peacock revolution.

I think his Clifford St. shop later went on to house Carlo Brandelli's Squire.

Leon
 
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Andy

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I only have one reference to him in The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes and that's in the Necktie Chapter, History Section:

British menswear designer Michael Fish launched a brightly colored and patterned, wide tie, known as the “kipper” in 1965. The front apron was 5 to 6 inches wide.
 

medwards

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He was certainly a major influence in the 60's fashion revolution...and his well noted ties were only one aspect of this. A shirtmaker by training and a designer by inclination, he was one of the first of the new wave to have set up shop in the environs of Savile Row (Rupert Lycett Green opened his bespoke tailoring business, Blades, a bit earlier; Tommy Nutter, I believe, a bit later). He also helped bring this new look to the cinema, having dressed Terence Stamp in vivid Liberty prints for his 1965 film role in 'Modesty Blaise'.
 
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Spoonern

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I have been a collector of Mr Fish garments for some years now so if any one would like to see more photos please let me know. I understand he is currently in the States working in the furniture (or some other non clothes related) business. I have heard him commenting on radio a couple of times.
 
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