cmoore

New Member
72
United States
CA
carlsbad
The only issue with asking HR or a recruiter is they may not know. In my firm our recruiter is 400 miles away and the culture of each office is slightly different.
Point well taken. Most interviews I've been in on, from either side, have been over the phone of late. I live in San Diego, based out of San Francisco, and our recruiter is in Chicago right now. It is much different from the small-group startup culture I used to be in where everyone was in one office.

And, come to think of it, the startup I joined on the way to working at a large company interviewed me over the phone and never asked me to come in before extending the offer. My direct manager was also a remote employee and didn't think it was worth both of us traveling to the office.

The world has changed. But I'd still be most comfortable in a suit I KNOW is flattering if I had to go into an interview blind. Better to look good even if you're more dressed than the interviewer.
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
14,564
United States
Illinois
Chicago
Would anyone here really see an applicant in a bad light if he were overdressed?

Perhaps a suit or even a blazer may not be the norm or the culture, but would anyone really turn away an applicant who may be qualified?

Just curious and would love to hear from someone who would.
 

cmoore

New Member
72
United States
CA
carlsbad
Yes, sort of.

I once witnessed the chief pilot at a banner tow company go on a foul mouthed tirade about the f-ing dandy in the f-ing suit. "Who the f does he think he is? Does he think we're mother fing United airlines?" Etc.

Not everyone is a professional, not everyone is educated, and not everyone works in an office. I don't care, and would never. But I have seen it happen.
 

Mr. B. Scott Robinson

Super Member
1,770
Atlanta, Georgia
United States
Georgia
Atlanta
Yes, sort of.

I once witnessed the chief pilot at a banner tow company go on a foul mouthed tirade about the f-ing dandy in the f-ing suit. "Who the f does he think he is? Does he think we're mother fing United airlines?" Etc.

Not everyone is a professional, not everyone is educated, and not everyone works in an office. I don't care, and would never. But I have seen it happen.
I would not like to work for that fellow. In that instance, the suit was a shield for good.

Cheers,

BSR
 

TKI67

Super Member
1,218
United States
Texas
Austin
I believe a key requirement for dressing for an interview is to be comfortable. I’ve always worn pretty much the same thing to interviews because it’s “me” and I’m comfortable in it. I get it that the interviewers might have expected black oxfords rather than the cordovan tassels or LHSs I always wear or a white point color shirt and a navy suit instead of my “go to” grey chalk stripe or glen plaid with an OCBD, but if they aren’t comfortable with me as myself it seems silly to want to work there.

As for job hopping, it’s often a fact of life. Even staid jobs like practicing law involve changes. Firms merge and change all the time. Industries change radically, witness banking. The thing that job hopping can accomplish if done thoughtfully is build valuable skills. If you achieved that 10,000 hours of experience at your job, you have mastered it. Stay if you love it, but if you don’t love it, be open to a new path.
 

3piece

Senior Member
635
United States
CA
Irvine
^^+1

Has anyone here, who has actually conducted a professional job interview, held a candidate in lesser regard due to their being dressed in a suit and tie?

Cheers,

BSR
We're bunch of nice people here and more open minded, we're just not good sample.

I work in tech and at first I'm worried about not dressing casually enough to an interview. But really, if I get rejected just because I wear a suit and tie, thank you, they probably save me miserable days working with them.
 

richard warren

Senior Member
541
United States
Louisiana
covington
So much about this is...I think “problematic” is the current word.

Taking advice from people you don’t know on the internet? On the internet? Advice from a journalist? Advice from someone who professes to reflect the current zeitgeist? Taking advice that implies human nature has changed rapidly in the span of a few years?

Bizarre advice about what to do or wear for a job interview makes me cringe, because of the possibility that people conducting interviews might read it and think of it as a valid reason for hiring people or not.
 

cmoore

New Member
72
United States
CA
carlsbad
I would not like to work for that fellow. In that instance, the suit was a shield for good.

Cheers,

BSR
You aren't kidding! My buddy did work for him. Jobs building hours in aviation were hard to come by. But you know he didn't make a career out of it.

But such people exist. You should have heard what he had to say about the guy being a CFI. My buddy and I were both only commercially rated, neither wanted to be an instructor, so he assumed we held instructors in as much disdain as he did.

Needless to say, he was a little too colorful for the sensebilities of folks here. But the point is, such people do exist. There is no single, generic, perfect way to act for every job interview. Especially once you step outside the more professional world.
 

smmrfld

Super Member
1,691
United States
California
Pleasanton
^^+1

Has anyone here, who has actually conducted a professional job interview, held a candidate in lesser regard due to their being dressed in a suit and tie?

Cheers,

BSR
Yes. If you can’t take the time to research the best way to present yourself in an interview, you’re likely not going to be a good hire. Cultural and professional norms change. Get on board or get left behind.
 
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