EBIKERBLUE

Starting Member
9
Hey Trad,

I am a preppy guy who likes to wear penny loafers sockless with jeans, chinos, and a blazer for a dressier look. Any suggestions for what brand of tassled loafers?

Thanks,
Ed
 

wnh

Advanced Member
2,004
United States
Missouri
Marshfield
Hey Trad,
I don't let just anybody talk to me like that, you know.

I am a preppy guy who likes to wear penny loafers sockless with jeans, chinos, and a blazer for a dressier look. Any suggestions for what brand of tassled loafers?
If you're so into penny loafers, khakis, blue blazers, and the preppy look, shouldn't you already know? Just wondering.
 

djl

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
353
If you're so into penny loafers, khakis, blue blazers, and the preppy look, shouldn't you already know? Just wondering.
I see what you mean, but I wore Weejuns, Bills and a Ben Silver blazer for a long time before I waded into tassel territory. Wouldn't have known Alden was the way to go without this forum.
 

Zot!

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
408
If I may take this thread in a slightly different direction...

Looking at the trad photo thread that was up a few days ago (as well as my own observations, now that I take more note of what people were wearing when I look at historic photos) I was struck by how truly ubiquitous the penny loafer used to be. Until about 1970 or so it seems to have been the universal casual men's shoe (that's right, it appears to have been worn with truly casual attire, as opposed to "dressy" or business casual today).

True, all of the "classic" shoe styles took a hit in the '70s, but some older shoes, like canvas sneakers and deck shoes, are still with us in some degree. But the penny loafer is just a few notches above the saddle shoe today. Can anybody here imagine somebody who didn't live through the ivy era wearing jeans, a T-shirt and a pair of Weejuns today?

So I guess I'm kind of wondering what lead to the downfall. Was there some sort of unheralded loafer burning movement, along the lines of feminists burning their bras in the '70s?
 
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Joe Beamish

Advanced Member
2,189
United States
Texas
Austin
Since I started educating myself on clothes (very recently, and very minimally), I've asked myself similar questions. A lot.

Why do today's men dress like [fill in the negative characterization of your choice]?

I dunno.

But my best guesses would be (and these would relate to your pennies inquiry):

-- Disposable society. Everything from technology to human relationships. Old stuff (including people) are less valuable than they used to be. If something doesn't work out -- just throw it away. Therefore don't spend too much money.

-- Similarly, newer is better. America has always been about innovation and novelty...but now even more so, thanks to technology.

-- The Importance of Me as Expressed in My Personal Aesthetic. I'm different. SEE? See how different I am? Do you? Do you? (This isn't such a terrible thing in itself, because it's an understandable correlate to our long overdue increased acceptance of diversity in all its forms. But we're still adolescents about it.)

It's an unwieldy subject, so I usually leave these questions half-answered and give up.

I don't own Aldens yet, but I'm pretty sure they're the way to go. I don't think the cheaper options are so hot (anymore).


So I guess I'm kind of wondering what lead to the downfall. Was there some sort of unheralded loafer burning movement, along the lines of feminists burning their bras in the '70s?
 
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Zot!

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
408
^But it's not quite as simple as that. There are a lot of older things that come back or remain steadily popular. Penny loafers just haven't for some reason.
 
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