Flanderian

Connoisseur
24,025
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
Perhaps substituting fontina for the burrata would add the desired creaminess while avoiding the odd flavor of burrata?
Nothing wrong with it, but I don't really enjoy fontina. The issue I have with burrata is that it's rather like a half cured mozzarella, but like mozzarella, doesn't seems to be very mildly flavored. I.e., I've yet to learn what burrata can add that mozzarella doesn't, unless you're wow'ed by the creation of a liquid center in what would otherwise be freshly made mozzarella. At least in this dish the creamy center might serve as a nice counterpoint to the chorizo.

Or I might rather shave an entirely different cheese on it instead. :icon_scratch:
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
32,044
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
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Or I might rather shave an entirely different cheese on it instead. :icon_scratch:
No, no...that won't be necessary. Recall if you will the wisdom of that old saw, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it!" Now please forgive me, as I get back to my drooling!;)
 

David J. Cooper

Senior Member
987
Canada
BC
Vancouver
Bolognese should be raw uncured, usually ground meats, stock, a small amount of tomato and a well cooked sofrito. The people of Emilia Romagna sometimes add milk as the meat is browned. Seems weird to me.

Never garlic or basil just salt and pepper and perhaps a bay leaf.

I love buratta with chopped fresh Chiles and fresh olive oil.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
24,025
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
Bolognese should be raw uncured, usually ground meats, stock, a small amount of tomato and a well cooked sofrito. The people of Emilia Romagna sometimes add milk as the meat is browned. Seems weird to me.

Never garlic or basil just salt and pepper and perhaps a bay leaf.

I love buratta with chopped fresh Chiles and fresh olive oil.
Authentic? Nope! Fine cuisine? Doubtful. Tasty? Very possibly!