Flanderian

Connoisseur
21,578
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
Sorry no access, but interesting information. My cynicism is immediately piqued as to their motivation, as such are most commonly just advertising ploys. If sincere, I must observe it's a lot easier to dismantle an industry than to rebuild one. Particularly where hard won skills developed over long years are required.
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
30,070
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
Doesn't Red Wing still produce a number of their boot designs in Minnesota.? I have two pair of Red Wing boots currently in the footwear collection, both of which the boxes are emblazoned with "Made In The USA." The secondwas bought less than four years ago. :icon_scratch:
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
14,556
United States
Illinois
Chicago
Doesn't Red Wing still produce a number of their boot designs in Minnesota.? I have two pair of Red Wing boots currently in the footwear collection, both of which the boxes are emblazoned with "Made In The USA." The secondwas bought less than four years ago. :icon_scratch:
Some of their boots are still domestically produced. Most are produced off shore.

Who knows, perhaps the market has changed and there’s better profits in marketing to blue collar chic hipsters than to actual blue collar workers.

Whatever their motivation, I applaud them for trying to bring manufacturing back to the U.S.
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,059
United States
New York
NY
Some of their boots are still domestically produced. Most are produced off shore.

Who knows, perhaps the market has changed and there’s better profits in marketing to blue collar chic hipsters than to actual blue collar workers.

Whatever their motivation, I applaud them for trying to bring manufacturing back to the U.S.
I think it's what you just said plus the supply chain expenses (labor cost have been rising - thankfully - in most countries) and risk (tariffs right now and a broader "anti-globalization" view in both parties) have made some amount of domestic production appealing / a risk-mitigation strategy.
 

jc1305us

New Member
97
United States
NJ
Basking Ridge
Read the article in the WSJ. They basically admit they cannot get the talent in the US to make the shoes anyone, due to retirements, deaths, and the training requirements needed. They are a privately held company and are hanging on to US manufacturing, even going so far as to introduce a new show that is mostly made in America, but started in the third world. They have hired many, but it seems like an uphill battle unfortunately.
 

EdwardWilson

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
110
United States
Illinois
Chicago
I go out of my way not to buy products made in China. USA and Canada are my preference, then UK, Italy, France, Spain and the rest of EU.

A few years back I started paying attention to where products I consume are made and it was quite a shock. I also only buy clothes and shoes that will last 5-10 years, if not longer. My days of buying disposable clothes are gladly over.

I pay more up front but get a better return in the long run. I have Brooks Brothers suits that are well over 10 years and still going strong, as Allen Edmonds' that are trending in that direction and have yet to requiring resoling.
 

Cassadine

Super Member
1,032
United States
Pennsylvania
Butler
This is a commendable effort. It is saddening that they cannot seem to find the labor. Too many younglings have majors in "Cultural Studies". An I've nothing against cultural studies.
 

SG_67

Connoisseur
14,556
United States
Illinois
Chicago
This is a commendable effort. It is saddening that they cannot seem to find the labor. Too many younglings have majors in "Cultural Studies". An I've nothing against cultural studies.
There’s a school in Chicago that teaches shoe making. I’m not really sure what they teach but this seems to me to be one of those things that hipsters are really into and I think a younger generation who may not necessarily be interested in college or that does but then wants something more tangible with which to express his/her efforts, shoemaking would be an excellent choice. An apprenticeship program is a great way to develop this sort of talent pool and develop artisans and craftsmen who could bring life to this.

I can’t see how Red Wing could do this wholly domestically given the range of shoes and boots they offer and the volume of sales.
 

Cassadine

Super Member
1,032
United States
Pennsylvania
Butler
There’s a school in Chicago that teaches shoe making. I’m not really sure what they teach but this seems to me to be one of those things that hipsters are really into and I think a younger generation who may not necessarily be interested in college or that does but then wants something more tangible with which to express his/her efforts, shoemaking would be an excellent choice. An apprenticeship program is a great way to develop this sort of talent pool and develop artisans and craftsmen who could bring life to this.

I can’t see how Red Wing could do this wholly domestically given the range of shoes and boots they offer and the volume of sales.

I hope you're correct. In the States we'll soon be in dire need of all skilled tradesmen. Plumbers, electricians etc.
 
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