3degrees

New Member
Is there a big difference between the two? Is it less important if I always have my shirts professionally cleaned? Specifically Charles Tyrwhitt shirts. Thank you gentleman.
 

alaric

Senior Member
Personally, I will stick to regular. the non iron shirts usually achieve the effect by coating the thread (before weaving), the fabric (before the shirt is built) or the shirt as a whole (after construction). Ironing the non iron shirt will eventually remove the coating. How many ironings/washings it takes to reduce the coating will vary by quality of coating and method of application.
 

dks202

Super Member
There are many laundry/dry cleaners who will not accept non-iron shirts for their laundry. Don't know how they do with dry cleaning. Non-iron shirts do not hold starch, they are very hot, and a they're a little heavier than regular shirts. I bought one and got rid of it quickly.
 

Shaver

Suspended
As I recall the last time we discussed this particular subject the ban-hammer was wielded and the thread eventually transferred to the interchange.

Ahh the good old days..... :redface:
 

Starch

Super Member
Dodging the controversial part, and going to the easier question:

Is it less important if I always have my shirts professionally cleaned?
I think it's pretty obvious that it's less important in that case. In other words: if you're going to get your shirts professionally cleaned (and pressed), the advantage of a non-iron shirt is largely eliminated. The purpose of the fabric, as suggested by its name, is that you can launder it without ironing. If you're going to iron it anyway, that's not an advantage.

I suppose non-iron shirts wrinkle less in the course of wearing, but that's a more minor issue. Personally, I don't really have a problem with shirts or any sort wrinkling in the course of wearing. That might be different depending on climate and your activities. On a specific note: Phoenix is hot, but "it's a dry heat." Well, that's what everyone always says.

Thank you gentleman.
The singular suggests either (i) that there's only one gentleman present or (ii) you're only expecting one answer. I won't speculate as to which was intended.
 

mrkleen

Super Member
There are many laundry/dry cleaners who will not accept non-iron shirts for their laundry.
Good story.

I think it's pretty obvious that it's less important in that case. In other words: if you're going to get your shirts professionally cleaned (and pressed), the advantage of a non-iron shirt is largely eliminated.
The biggest selling point to Non Iron shirts is that they retain their crisp look longer - so at the end of the day, you dont look like a bag of wrinkles. I dont know anyone the wears non iron shirts in a professional environment who doesn't press them after laundering them.
 
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3degrees

New Member
Thank you gentlemen. I did a little research on the subject but, was interested in some first hand insights from AAAC members with non iron shirt experience. Regular shirts it is.
 

cdavant

Advanced Member
Good story.



The biggest selling point to Non Iron shirts is that they retain their crisp look longer - so at the end of the day, you dont look like a bag of wrinkles. I dont know anyone the wears non iron shirts in a professional environment who doesn't press them after laundering them.
I wear non-irons in a professional environment--Dr.'s office--all the time without pressing them first. Most are good for 25 or more washes before they begin to look like they need pressing (BB, Lands End, JAB Traveler). My wife hangs all my shirts slightly damp as they come out of the dryer and the newer NI look ironed beside the must-irons they hang beside. Pressing a good NI is a waste of time for months if not years.
 

momsdoc

Connoisseur
my wife insisted I try no iron shirts to save on laundry bills. The only problem is they still need touchups and as she does not iron, I end up doing it. That means I end up giving up and sending them to the cleaners anyway, so buying non iron becomes a moot point. Maybe I'm imagining it but I think I can feel the difference in texture between the two and prefer the feel of regular shirts. But again I may just be kidding myself.
 
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Stubbly

Super Member
All the non-iron shirts I've tried seem to have some "cling" to them, especially in the dry winter air.

Cotton shirts wrinkle a lot, but I still prefer cotton shirts (no starch).
 

medhat

Super Member
I wear non-iron (BB) exclusively during the week for work. I always wear a cotton undershirt, and the "breathability" issue has never bothered me. I work exclusively indoors, in an air-conditioned environment, and it simply isn't an issue. I'm a little old school, and was a long time adherent of traditional BB shirting (I actually enjoy ironing - find it relaxing), but IMO there's no question that, at the end of the day, non-irons continue to look good, whereas traditional shirts are pretty wrinkly. I have BB traditional finish shirts for my formal (black tie) shirts, but even here, if they offer a non-iron alternative, I may take the bait. I also have several CT non-irons, and IMO they're a little more variable in their non-iron finishes. Some I need to touch up a bit more than others. But all in all, I like them.
 

kravi

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I wear non-iron (BB) exclusively during the week for work. I always wear a cotton undershirt, and the "breathability" issue has never bothered me. I work exclusively indoors, in an air-conditioned environment, and it simply isn't an issue. I'm a little old school, and was a long time adherent of traditional BB shirting (I actually enjoy ironing - find it relaxing), but IMO there's no question that, at the end of the day, non-irons continue to look good, whereas traditional shirts are pretty wrinkly. I have BB traditional finish shirts for my formal (black tie) shirts, but even here, if they offer a non-iron alternative, I may take the bait. I also have several CT non-irons, and IMO they're a little more variable in their non-iron finishes. Some I need to touch up a bit more than others. But all in all, I like them.
^

This. I love non-iron shirts. I iron all my shirts anyway, and rather enjoy the process. With regular shirts I get wrinkly fast, even with an undershirt underneath. A non-iron shirt will stay smoother all day, regardless of whether or not I'm inside or outside.

--Me
 

vasuvius

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I find that the non-iron shirts tend to gather more sweat stains on the collar and cuffs. I always send my shirts to the local cleaners for washing and ironing (can't beat the $1 price) and after a while, the non-iron shirts never really get clean well.
None of the non non-iron shirts ever have any sweat stain issues
 

altovintner

Starting Member
Of the 15 or so dress shirts that I have in my lineup now, 3 are so-called no-iron. One no-iron is from BB and the other two are Lands End. I find that the BB shirt is the best no-iron shirt that I have now and the best out of all I have owned over the years. Have to touch up the Lands End shirts here and there. My other shirts include RL Polo OCBDs, Zegna, and custom orders from Modern Tailor.

Having said that, I am an ultra-light one-bag traveler. Have used Eagle Creek packing folders for over 15 years now and I swear by them. If I fold an ironed shirt properly and use the packing folder, I do not need touch-up ironing at the hotel. If needed at the hotel, I just hang 'em up in shower area with hot water running and in no time they are good to go. Same for suit coats and pants. For both personal and business travel, I have used the no-irons quite a bit (admittedly the other $75+ shirts look better at the start....) and I can say that from my experience, the no-irons hold up quite well during the day. And that is saying something as I often travel to Austin on business with temps and humidity 95+.

About 80% of the time, I iron my own shirts. It is only when I run into a schedule crunch that I might send shirts to the cleaners. When I do my own ironing on a nice fabric shirt, such as a 2-ply 120s cotton, I can iron a shirt expertly in 15 to 20 minutes. When you have good cotton to work with, ironing is a breeze. Those of you who do your own ironing on these types of shirts can relate to this. On the other hand, the last time I ironed a pinpoint RL Polo shirt, it took me nearly 30 minutes! Big difference.

One additional note. This past summer the DW and I went on a 16 day overseas trip that included a Mediterranean cruise. I took only one carry-on bag with 4 short sleeve shirts, 3 long-sleeve no-iron shirts, 4 pairs of pants and various other things and had 28 "outfits" with that setup. For me, hand washing clothes in the sink takes only maybe 15 minutes tops and they dry the next morning. The 4 short sleeve shirts were golf-type shirts that did not require ironing. The 3 long sleeve no-irons worked great.

Blessings to all.
 

thegrayshazam

Starting Member
Try the best of both worlds - Eton shirts. I believe they make a lot of their own cotton, and somewhere in the process it becomes naturally wrinkle-resistant. I don't like their collars as much as some of my other shirts, however they're my go-to travel option.
 

AaroninOC

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
I have countless BB NI shirts and wash them only when soiled. I get 3-7 wearings easily between needed washings so long as I don't have spicy miso ramen for lunch (I always end up wearing Santouka ramen).

My game plan is to throw them in the dryer for 4 minutes and then allow them to cool on a hanger prior to wearing in the morning. They look sharp with a sport coat or suit and hold up wonderfully on their own.
 
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