Yoshi Ronin

Starting Member
4
I've recently stumbled upon the article on Andy's website about how skin tone affects what colors look good on people.

http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/Clothes Articles/ColorSIMPLE.htm

I am Asian,and based on the article, I am winter which means I look good on "pure" colors like black, white, red and blue, and to avoid beige, gold and pastel colors as they make my skin appear sallow, which I believe is true. I should also wear silver jewelry instead of gold.

I have vintage jackets and blazers that are brown and muted green. A couple are green and brown plaid. I hate to get rid of them as they fit me extremely well and I have great difficulties finding my size. My question is, can I keep them? And if so, how do I wear them? Do I completely avoid buying clothes that doesn't belong in my color group?

I hate to think that I can only wear black leather shoes from now on.
 

fullgrain

Senior Member
770
I've recently stumbled upon the article on Andy's website about how skin tone affects what colors look good on people.

http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/Clothes Articles/ColorSIMPLE.htm

I am Asian,and based on the article, I am winter which means I look good on "pure" colors like black, white, red and blue, and to avoid beige, gold and pastel colors as they make my skin appear sallow, which I believe is true. I should also wear silver jewelry instead of gold.

I have vintage jackets and blazers that are brown and muted green. A couple are green and brown plaid. I hate to get rid of them as they fit me extremely well and I have great difficulties finding my size. My question is, can I keep them? And if so, how do I wear them? Do I completely avoid buying clothes that doesn't belong in my color group?

I hate to think that I can only wear black leather shoes from now on.
First off, don't worry about the shoes; they don't need to complement your face. In general, I think you are on the right track. I have a similar complexion and can look washed out in yellows, reds, and certain browns--anything too close to the skin tone. (Green is a cool color and shouldn't be a problem.) On the other hand, I can wear darker, higher contrast/intensity browns. Like anything else, use the color palette as a guide rather than as a rule. A good fit might trump a so-so color, or if there is a lot of texture in the brown/green jackets, that might work. Or paired w/ a white shirt and bright tie. The question should be how the individual item looks on you.
 

tkteo

New Member
25
I use this book: Image Matters for Men: How to Dress for Success (with Colour Me Beautiful).

For what it's worth, the book uses a different colour schema from the seasonal one you mentioned. Like you, I am (East) Asian descent, and thus would be classified as "Winter" using the seasonal schema and "Deep" using the one in Image Matters.

The book has been very helpful in identifying what my neutral, formal shirt, and casual wear colours, are.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Image-Matters-Men-Dress-Success/dp/0600615189
 

nmprisons

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
101
Just to be clear, you are thinking about getting rid of some jackets that you like and that fit you well because an article said that the color isn't the right one for you? Seriously?
 

trims

Senior Member
500
United States
NJ
NJ
Just to be clear, you are thinking about getting rid of some jackets that you like and that fit you well because an article said that the color isn't the right one for you? Seriously?
+100000000 to this. Take this website and all advice given here with a grain of salt. Don't throw away you're whole wardrobe because of what someone on the internet told you. This website can be an invaluable guide, but if something has worked for you up to this point in your life, and you think it still works, stick with it.

Maybe keep a sharper eye on avoiding those colors for future purchases, but I don't think you need to start back at square one today.
 

Loose On The Lead

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
138
Just to be clear, you are thinking about getting rid of some jackets that you like and that fit you well because an article said that the color isn't the right one for you? Seriously?
If the article brought something to his attention that he hadn't thought about or noticed before, why not?

To the OP...I recently hired an image consultant to come over and do a color analysis for me and my wife because, frankly, neither of us is any good at that sort of thing. :) This particular consultant emphasized that it was important to be practical in choosing the colors of your clothing. Maybe certain colors are ideal for you, but how easy is it to find those exact colors in garments you like, and how much of a difference does a slight deviation from the ideal really make?

Her recommendation for me was that while I looked best in certain colors, the main thing (and I think this would apply to you, as well) was to avoid yellowish undertones. I can wear green, but I need to lean towards bluish greens and avoid yellowish greens. I can wear red, but if anything, it should be slightly purplish, not slightly orange-ish. I can wear brown, but I look best in chocolate brown, not in a brown with yellowish undertones. Make sense? You can mostly wear the colors you want, but try to stick with non-yellowish versions of them.

I guess red isn't all that relevant for jackets, but for shirts...
 
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Yoshi Ronin

Starting Member
4
Thanks everyone for your input. This is my first post BTW.

The last thing that I want is to get rid of them. The article has been very helpful because I now have a better idea when getting dressed and buying new clothes instead of just grabbing for what appealed to me at the time.

I guess what I am asking is, how do you wear something that is not from my color group? For example, if I wear my yellowish-brown green blazer with a brown or dark green tie and white shirt, it washes out my skin tone. But if I wear it with one from my color group such as a black tie, it doesn't match the blazer. The last time I wore the aforementioned combination, I did not feel confident or strong in them. Now I know why.
 

Grayson

Super Member
1,340
United States
Georgia
Atlanta
I'm a "winter", but love my tweed and camel hair coats in the Fall/Winter months. A simple step to cancel out the effect is to wear either turtlenecks or cashmere/merino long-sleeve polos in strong jewel tones or black. I would avoid white in such cases, as while it IS one of your colors, it doesn't have canceling/enhancement qualities.

As long as the correct colors are next to your face, no worries about the sallowing effect. Examples - Look at Steve McQueen in "Bullitt" and Al Pacino in "Godfather 2" and you'll see what I mean. :icon_smile_wink:
 

CharlesAlexander

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
114
As long as you make sure you look good in something before you buy, you should be OK.

But yes, you should wear clothes that compliement your skin tone.
 
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