katon

Super Member
1,094
Christmas Island
N/A
N/A
Maybe different in your area, but usually the combo of tattersall, tartan and tweed seems to mean, "I am the sort of person who goes to the local Highland Games". If the idea of going makes you roll your eyes, I would avoid that combo, while if it makes you laughingly agree, then fire away -- you might encourage others with similar interests to start up a conversation.
 

drpeter

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
143
United States
Wisconsin
Stevens Point
I think the key elements are size and prominence. If two similar patterns are to be next to each other, then one must be a small pattern and the other large. To wit:

A small micro-tattersall shirt with lighter colors like fading maroon/burnt orange on a cream background, say, would go quite handsomely with a tie which sports a darker, larger tartan like a Royal Stewart. But it would be essential to "break" this placement of patterns with a jacket or suit that is almost completely solid and/or dark, say midnight blue or charcoal, providing a large, uniform background field against which to contrast the two side-by-side patterns.

Another example of this principle: A very fine, light blue-on-white, short-point-collar pinstripe shirt would be resolutely dashing with an Oxford grey chalk stripe double-breasted suit, although I would "break" the pattern placement with a solid dark blue or charcoal tie. A similar aesthetic will swing into play when considering fabric texture, and I could write a short essay on that! Another time, perhaps.

When in doubt, place patterns together and scrutinize! Don't worry too much about rules, they are there to be broken from time to time. If the effect pleases you, then that's what counts -- wear it. IMHO.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
22,484
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
I think the key elements are size and prominence. If two similar patterns are to be next to each other, then one must be a small pattern and the other large. To wit:

A small micro-tattersall shirt with lighter colors like fading maroon/burnt orange on a cream background, say, would go quite handsomely with a tie which sports a darker, larger tartan like a Royal Stewart. But it would be essential to "break" this placement of patterns with a jacket or suit that is almost completely solid and/or dark, say midnight blue or charcoal, providing a large, uniform background field against which to contrast the two side-by-side patterns.

Another example of this principle: A very fine, light blue-on-white, short-point-collar pinstripe shirt would be resolutely dashing with an Oxford grey chalk stripe double-breasted suit, although I would "break" the pattern placement with a solid dark blue or charcoal tie. A similar aesthetic will swing into play when considering fabric texture, and I could write a short essay on that! Another time, perhaps.

When in doubt, place patterns together and scrutinize! Don't worry too much about rules, they are there to be broken from time to time. If the effect pleases you, then that's what counts -- wear it. IMHO.

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