guitone

Advanced Member
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E Longmeadow
I juat picked up a nice spring jacket in tencel, I have another but it is a very light ivory color and I wanted something a bit darker (this one is dark tan). The salesman told tencel is made from wood and I did a bit of research on it and it sure seems like he is right. I had thought that it did not breath well but maybe that was must my belief that it was a poly like material. Things I like about my first one are the fact that it travels well, can be washed in the machine should it get dirty and holds it's shape. This may sound silly but being a natural fiber makes me feel a lot better about this material.

guit
 

ROI

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
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quote:Originally posted by guitone

I juat picked up a nice spring jacket in tencel, I have another but it is a very light ivory color and I wanted something a bit darker (this one is dark tan). The salesman told tencel is made from wood...
Yes, but... rayon is also usually made from wood (or sometimes, as in the case of Bemberg, cotton flinders), the cellulose in plant stuffs, to be exact. The same is true of the relatively new bamboo fiber that has been popping up in sportcoats. The difference between a natural fiber such as cotton and the cellulosic fibers is that the cotton bolls that grow on cotton plants are transformed into cotton yarn and woven into cloth without essentially altering the cotton fiber that nature created. In chemically crude terms, rayon, Tencel and some others, are reconstituted from organic matter (wood, bamboo, etc) that has been reduced to pulp and and further broken down by solvents. The desirable cellulose is then extruded like dough through a pasta machine to create a fiber. Unlike petroleum based fibers, however, cellulosic fibers retain the absorbency, flexiblity, and breathability of a natural fiber, which recommends them for use in coat linings, dresses, and during WWII as a substitute for silk in neckties. If you examine the content of "cotton balls" at the drug store, you'll frequently find rayon replacing some or all of the cotton.
 

Badrabbit

Super Member
1,409
I've got a Tencel shirt that is the most comfortable one I own. Drapes great and virtually repels wrinkles.

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Women thrive on novelty and are easy meat for the commerce of fashion. Men prefer old pipes and torn jackets.
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freakseam

New Member
45
I have to agree with the "drapes great" observation, but disagree with the "virtually repels wrinkles" comment. Regardless, it is super-comfortable, soft, and has the sheen.
 

gordgekko

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
457
Yeah, I would agree with the "virtually repels wrinkles" bit as well, though I do find that tencel flavoured shirts due tend to resist them better than pure cotton shirts.

I don't mind them, I own a few and they seem alright.


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Andy V.

New Member
32
ROI makes some good points.

How does being made from wood make Tencel a natural rather than synthetic fiber? Every synthetic fiber derives from some natural source.
 

Alexander Kabbaz

Tech and Business Advice Guru
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East Hampton
quote:
Posted - 03/17/2006 : 04:02:15
ROI makes some good points.

How does being made from wood make Tencel a natural rather than synthetic fiber? Every synthetic fiber derives from some natural source.
Tencel, Lyocell, and MicroModal are among a group of Austrian Beech tree derivative fibers termed "Organic Synthetics" due to the fact that they are reconstituted cellulose products rather than harshly produced plastics such as polyester, acetate, microfiber polyester, vinyl, and nylon to name a few. Additionally, the production of these Organic Synthetics follows the environmentally friendly (E.U. based) OkoTex 100 standard which is not the case with petroleum-based fiber production. MicroModal, with which I am very familiar, is even classified as 'cotton' for importation standards by U.S. Customs. It, for example, is comprised of 100% cellulose vs. cotton's 82% cellulose content.

As one totally allergic to polyester (thank God!) yet who wears MicroModal every day, I can attest to the fact that there is a world of difference in the results between these two methods of creating fibers.

Much more information about this can be garnered by Googling "Lenzing", the Austrian inventor/producer of Tencel and the others.

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J. Homely

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
243
Interesting um, 'thread'. Reminds me that at one point in time (maybe 10 years ago) I was seeing a bunch of products made of ramie -- but I don't think I've seen anything with ramie in it in quite some time.

I've always thought it was interesting that even men who aren't especially particular about clothes tend to be careful about avoiding synthetics, while lots of well-dressed women wear synthetics.
 

Andy

Site Creator/ Administrator
Staff member
10,909
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Palm Desert
Some definitions from The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes, Fabrics chapter:

Tencel is a fabric made from wood fibers, which has a soft hand, breathes and gives fabrics color richness, low shrinkage, and strength with good tear resistance. The first commercial production of lyocell in the U.S. was introduced in 1993 by Courtaulds Fibers, under the “Tencel¨ trade name. The difference between Rayon (also made from wood fibers) and Tencel is that Rayon is made using a chemical process, while Tencel production uses a spinning process. Tencel lends a fluid quality when woven with other fibers. Wools drape better, linen has fewer wrinkles, and denims become softer.

Rayon is composed of wood pulp and cotton linters (the fibers that remain on cotton seeds after the first ginning). It was the first manmade fabric invented in 1884 by a French scientist, (Louis Marie) Hilaire Berignaud de Chardonnet (1839–1924), as a less expensive substitute for silk. The name may have come from the French word rayon, meaning ray of light or from “ray†to indicate a superior sheen, and the “on†in cotton.

The first commercial production of rayon fiber in the United States was in 1910 by the American Viscose Company. It was marketed as “artificial silkâ€.

The two most commonly used rayon types are:

Cuprammonium is made by producing a type of regenerated rayon fiber. In this process, the wood pulp or cotton liners are dissolved in an ammoniac copper oxide solution. Bemberg is a brand of cupramonium rayon, the best lining for suit or sports jackets.

Viscose named for the viscous solution from which the threads are spun.



Andy
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