poppies

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
102
United States
California
Los Angeles
I'll get concerned only when ties achieve breeches-level general unacceptability. Although, now that I think about it, breeches are ripe for an ironic comeback.
 

JBierly

Advanced Member
2,831
United States
Tennessee
Chattanooga
I don't see ties with suits much at all. Seems like its reduced to being on the podium, at the courthouse and perhaps that's it. I feel like it is way less than 50%. For example, if I wear a tie out to dinner it is likely I am the only one outside of the staff wearing a tie.
 

williamson

Senior Member
748
Europe
...
...
I still wear ties, even with sport coats.
I don't like the look of an open-necked shirt with suit, sports jacket or blazer; but I will wear a sports-jacket with a roll-necked jumper in winter. In summer I'd always drop the jacket (an extra layer) rather than the tie, but I know that this is heresy in these fora!
 

eagle2250

Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
30,078
Harmony, FL
United States
Florida
Harmony
When I was a young man growing up (late 1950's) it would have been a rarity, if not impossible to sight a man/boy in church without a coat and tie. These days it seems the situation is reversed, with the odd guy in the coat and tie and the masses dressed as sub-par AmJacks! Alas, lately even I find myself occassionally attending Sunday services wearing my navy blazer over an open collared knit polo shirt. Perhaps I too have taken my first steps down the path that leads one to spending eternity in sartorial Hell? :(
 

paul winston

Super Member
Advertiser
1,541
United States
new york
new york
The tie business now addresses a "niche" market. When I walk from the Port Authority in NYC to my 44th St appointments I see 100s of men and can count on one hand the number who are wearing a tie. Because I am in the sunset of my days I don't need a lot of business to put a smile on my face. In the short run the trend is eliminating some of the competition.
A man wearing a tie with a suit looks complete and leaves a positive impression to most observers.
Personally I have always enjoyed wearing a tie. I don't find it uncomfortable. I often wear my "novelty" designs and through the years they have created many conversations.
Paul Winston
www.chippneckwear.com
 

FiscalDean

Super Member
1,615
United States
WI
Elcho
These days it seems the situation is reversed, with the odd guy in the coat and tie and the masses dressed as sub-par AmJacks!

I live on a lake where seasonal people represent 90% of the population. As you can imagine, the people attending Sunday church services are very casual. I rarely see anyone in a sport coat let alone a tie.
 

TKI67

Super Member
1,218
United States
Texas
Austin
I loved Tod’s pish posh on government workers. It sure as heck ain’t the private sector!
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,073
United States
New York
NY
...Back in the nineteen seventies when I worked in a very conservative bank, the ranks of dark grey and navy suits were almost indistinguishable, and that was amplified by the fact that virtually everyone wore pale blue or white pinpoint shirts and well shined black cap toed bals. Occasionally some rebel wore an ecru shirt or some #8 wingtips. Ties were another matter. There were repps, polka dots, emblematic, neats, Macclesfields, and even the odd madder paisley. No two were alike. Then in the mid nineteen eighties the Hermès craze was upon us, and gorgeous patterns and electric colors started to appear. ...
I know I've told this before (I have very few interesting things in my past, so I just recycle a lot). I joined the trading / investment banking division on UBS in NYC in 1988 where the gentleman running the trading floor was an old Wall Street pro. The unwritten rule (I learned it by watching, it wasn't written down anywhere as far as I knew) was suit and tie and, like, TK167 noted, almost all were grey or navy suits with white or light blue shirts and an extensive array of ties, but still, none that couldn't have come from BB or Paul Stuart.

The one "quirk" in the code was the also unwritten rule that on Friday from Memorial Day to Labor Day (with a hard start and stop), one could wear a navy blazer, tailored chinos (no just-slept-in-look Gap, Dockers, etc. - these were the type of chinos that came not hemmed when you bought them), white or light blue shirt (or a blue and white striped one - another summer Friday exception) tie and dress shoes.

As crazy as it sounds, those summer Friday outfits really did feel different and casual and fun and young. Even the dress code - which seems so severe when looking back - was pretty normal for a lot of Wall Street back then. Little did I know that the '90s would, pretty much, end all of that in about a decade.


The tie business now addresses a "niche" market. When I walk from the Port Authority in NYC to my 44th St appointments I see 100s of men and can count on one hand the number who are wearing a tie. ...
What Paul didn't note is that his walk takes him through one of Manhattan's major business district. I usually note about 10% tie-wearers in that area - so not far off from Paul's estimate. Come up to my neighborhood - the Upper East Side - and the number drops to 5% during the week and 1% on weekends (and that's only 'cause I live near a large teaching hospital which seems to have a few older employees who still dress in suits or sport coats and ties).

IMHO, as it's all just what I see on the street, the move away from suits and ties has accelerated in the last few years. As noted, you'll still see them in the biz districts - but they no longer dominate even there - and away from those areas, you only see a single percentage of men in them.

Where I've also noted a rapid decline is in non-business situations. Other than weddings and funerals (and it's no longer a given that everyone will wear one at a wedding and the last few funerals I went to were well less than 50% suit and ties), I never see suits or ties and only a few men (like me) who still wear sport coats.

My standard not-summer - not work - outfit is chinos (occasionally jeans). buck or desert boots, OCBD, sweater and sport coat (not tie) and I hear - more and more each year - "why are you so dressed up?" I can't imagine the reaction I'd get if I added a tie or wore a suit.
 

TKI67

Super Member
1,218
United States
Texas
Austin
Fading Fast, my not summer and not work outfit is Levis, chinos, or cords, a chambray workshirt or a Tee-shirt, and either a sweater or, if it’s cold or wet, a waterproof coat, and I get the same comment! Standards are even lower here than in the city. I tend to look presentable as these fora might view it only a few times a week, sometimes only once! An observation appropriate to your avatar. By merely putting on a watch even the chambray and chinos looks dressier!
 

Fading Fast

Connoisseur
8,073
United States
New York
NY
Fading Fast, my not summer and not work outfit is Levis, chinos, or cords, a chambray workshirt or a Tee-shirt, and either a sweater or, if it’s cold or wet, a waterproof coat, and I get the same comment! Standards are even lower here than in the city. I tend to look presentable as these fora might view it only a few times a week, sometimes only once! An observation appropriate to your avatar. By merely putting on a watch even the chambray and chinos looks dressier!
Wow and I've always assumed it was the sport coat that made my outfit look so "dressed up" to others.
 
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