Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
5,047
United States
Maine
Mars Hill
Obscure as much of the waist line? Mr. Peaky, to me, that defeats the purpose of wearing high-waisted pants!
Depends on how you view this. To me the only reason for hi-rise is the comfort they bring both standing or sitting. I don't think they much add or detract visually from other positions, save lo-rise..

All of my suit pants, dress pants and some khakis are tailored hi-rise. (I can tell you how to do this if Matt S isn't listening.). All of those pants are always worn with jackets, many with suspenders. Am partial to Bugs Bunny ones. Very smoothitz.
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
23,951
United States
New Jersey
Flanders
Thoughts on a long sleeve polo with these?

This was my last MTM shirt iteration, and I got what I asked for. I don't like it! A slim/snug fit shirt does not look good on me as I've learned.


I very much like how the short sleeve polo looks with your trousers, I can see no reason a similar long sleeve polo won't also look great.

My shirtmakers typically made their shirts at 4" over skin, which of course mean you'd have a total of only 2" each, front and back. That was, and IMO still is a snugger shirt. Since I'm a larger guy, and can't abide snug fitting clothing, I had them double it. That was in my weight training days, and I had a large chest and shoulders. I wanted a bit of drape at the chest and back of the shoulders, and enough cloth at the waist for slight blousing.

My objective is relaxed elegance, and anything constraining, or pulling, is the antithesis.

Do pleats work well with winter fabrics? I read somewhere that pleats work best with fabrics that have "give" to them.

I'd love some moleskins, corduroys, flannels, tweed trousers in pleats, but not if they end up looking bulky.
Yes, they work very well. The only issue with bulkier cloth (And this can be true of linen too.) is that it sometimes doesn't drape as well. Twills, tend to drape best, even in lighter weights, but a heavier cavalry twill or whipcord will drape supremely. Cuffs add weight at the bottom of the leg and tend to aid drape significantly. Another secret is to have your tailor sew removable tiny weights into the cuffs. It used to be common on bespoke clothing, and fine ladies' skirts may still use them.

All of my trousers have pleats, both lighter and heavier weights.

I will wear it with a jacket as well, but admittedly the polo+trousers combo appeals to me out of pure comfort as well. I run VERY hot though compared to most people.
There's no reason you can't wear a fine quality polo shirt with handsomely tailored trousers and a sport jacket. It's a classic, and IMO, very smart look.
 
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delicious_scent

Super Member
1,692
Canada
Saskatchewan
Regina
That shirt doesn't look that bad from the front. I don't care for it from the back, though tucked in might be a different story. Especially with higher waisted pants.

Untucked, my shirts are a little more roomy than the ones I wear under a suit. I'm twice as wide as you (not literally, but I'm short and broad shouldered) and even with the extra 20lbs around the middle anything that fits my shoulders needs a good taper to not tent out. Just like your slender waist and broad shoulders. But too tight leaves no drape, which at some point crosses a line from showing off physique to looking awkward. I think that shirt just crosses that line a bit.

Crisp is nice, but I think you should look for some nice linen with a little texture and a little more room if you run hot. They'll work tucked or untucked, give a casual vibe untucked, and the texture is subtle enough to work with just about any coat over those trousers. I have a shirt in this:


I swear it's the most worn summer shirt I have.
I agree the shirt looks awkward and a bit of drape is necessary as I've learned.

I will definitely wear roomier linen shirts with these trousers once my size stabilizes.
Very nice trousers. If you don’t mind sharing, what is the rise on those?
I told my tailor I wanted an 11.5" front rise, but I haven't actually measured the inseam vs. outseam
 

delicious_scent

Super Member
1,692
Canada
Saskatchewan
Regina
Depends on how you view this. To me the only reason for hi-rise is the comfort they bring both standing or sitting. I don't think they much add or detract visually from other positions, save lo-rise..

All of my suit pants, dress pants and some khakis are tailored hi-rise. (I can tell you how to do this if Matt S isn't listening.). All of those pants are always worn with jackets, many with suspenders. Am partial to Bugs Bunny ones. Very smoothitz.
Ah, that's where we differ then. I like the visual interest that pleats offer.

Not sure what is meant but telling me how to tailor high-rise pants?
I very much like how the short sleeve polo looks with your trousers, I can see no reason a similar long sleeve polo won't also look great.

My shirtmakers typically made their shirts at 4" over skin, which of course mean you'd have a total of only 2" each, front and back. That was, and IMO still is a snugger shirt. Since I'm a larger guy, and can't abide snug fitting clothing, I had them double it. That was in my weight training days, and I had a large chest and shoulders. I wanted a bit of drape at the chest and back of the shoulders, and enough cloth at the waist for slight blousing.

My objective is relaxed elegance, and anything constraining, or pulling, is the antithesis.



Yes, they work very well. The only issue with bulkier cloth (And this can be true of linen too.) is that it sometimes doesn't drape as well. Twills, tend to drape best, even in lighter weights, but a heavier cavalry twill or whipcord will drape supremely. Cuffs add weight at the bottom of the leg and tend to aid drape significantly. Another secret is to have your tailor sew removable tiny weights into the cuffs. It used to be common on bespoke clothing, and fine ladies' skirts may still use them.

All of my trousers have pleats, both lighter and heavier weights.



There's no reason you can't wear a fine quality polo shirt with handsomely tailored trousers and a sport jacket. It's a classic, and IMO, very smart look.
I was thinking of getting one with a one-piece collar down the road. I love how it looks. I've had a fetish for one piece collars lately with how smooth and casual they look without collapsing.


I agree with wanting relaxed elegance, that's my goal as well. For me, it seems like 5" over skin would work well without looking snug. Adding side pleats on the back of my shirts should help as well. No more shirt purchases until my size stabilizes though.

Cavalry twill or whipcord sound like great options for my climate and generally more casual attire.

Someone posted a picture of Covert Twill trousers, which are apparently quite similiar, and they seem up my alley. Very khaki-like, but I assume with the drape of wool.

 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
23,951
United States
New Jersey
Flanders


I agree with wanting relaxed elegance, that's my goal as well. For me, it seems like 5" over skin would work well without looking snug. Adding side pleats on the back of my shirts should help as well. No more shirt purchases until my size stabilizes though.
I would think 5" over skin would work well for you.

While I also like one piece collars, I prefer a conventional collar for a polo, with three buttons, as I feel it's slightly more formal in appearance, and better compliment the more structured appearance of tailored clothing.

Cavalry twill or whipcord sound like great options for my climate and generally more casual attire.

Someone posted a picture of Covert Twill trousers, which are apparently quite similiar, and they seem up my alley. Very khaki-like, but I assume with the drape of wool.

The terms are sometimes confused. I'd think that a whipcord. Covert cloth is also a twill, but the defining characteristic is the intermixing of two different colored threads when spinning the yarn.
 

Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
5,047
United States
Maine
Mars Hill
Ah, that's where we differ then. I like the visual interest that pleats offer.

Not sure what is meant but telling me how to tailor high-rise pants?
I was thinking of getting one with a one-piece collar down the road. I love how it looks. I've had a fetish for one piece collars lately with how smooth and casual they look without collapsing.


I agree with wanting relaxed elegance, that's my goal as well. For me, it seems like 5" over skin would work well without looking snug. Adding side pleats on the back of my shirts should help as well. No more shirt purchases until my size stabilizes though.

Cavalry twill or whipcord sound like great options for my climate and generally more casual attire.

Someone posted a picture of Covert Twill trousers, which are apparently quite similiar, and they seem up my alley. Very khaki-like, but I assume with the drape of wool.

You and I are confusing ourselves here. I like your new hi-risers and own similar. We differ on how and where to wear them. Me, always with a jacket or sweater. You, however you wish. We all have personal standards, you just heard one of mine. I over-stepped earlier suggesting you consider similar. (I also wear lower-rise 501s, always with a jacket, mostly to distinguish my self from the guy wearing 501s at the next table halfway through his second whopper.)

My remark about visual interest was about rise, not pleats, which have much. My remark on tailoring hi rise was to clue you to the idea that many pants manufactured as medium rise can be converted to hi rise; I have done so repeatedly.
 

delicious_scent

Super Member
1,692
Canada
Saskatchewan
Regina
I would think 5" over skin would work well for you.

While I also like one piece collars, I prefer a conventional collar for a polo, with three buttons, as I feel it's slightly more formal in appearance, and better compliment the more structured appearance of tailored clothing.



The terms are sometimes confused. I'd think that a whipcord. Covert cloth is also a twill, but the defining characteristic is the intermixing of two different colored threads when spinning the yarn.
All good, I understand the formality differences and preferences. I do wish that the polo up there had more buttons.

I'd likely enjoy whipcord, covert, or cavalry twill in my wardrobe.
You and I are confusing ourselves here. I like your new hi-risers and own similar. We differ on how and where to wear them. Me, always with a jacket or sweater. You, however you wish. We all have personal standards, you just heard one of mine. I over-stepped earlier suggesting you consider similar. (I also wear lower-rise 501s, always with a jacket, mostly to distinguish my self from the guy wearing 501s at the next table halfway through his second whopper.)

My remark about visual interest was about rise, not pleats, which have much. My remark on tailoring hi rise was to clue you to the idea that many pants manufactured as medium rise can be converted to hi rise; I have done so repeatedly.
OH, I see now, thank you for clearing it up.

I do agree with you that high rise trousers look better with a jacket or a sweater. Flanderian posted a picture years ago that showed a high rise pair of trousers worn with a casual button-up shirt.

My initial reaction was the same as when you said "the world isn't ready for this", it looked off and a bit odd.

I don't know what changed, but I do enjoy the look now. You didn't overstep, I took it as a well meaning suggestion, even if I didn't agree.

I'm curious to that idea, how can medium rise be converted to high rise? I heard my grandma mention this as well.
 

Peak and Pine

Connoisseur
5,047
United States
Maine
Mars Hill
^

Regarding a change in rise of which you inquire...

A long time ago I had a fall from a very high place. When the side upon which I landed completely healed, two years about, it wasn't quite the same size as it had been.Everything was smaller, shorter, crooked. Some of this was noticable even clothed. Like ass cheeks. One rounded. One a pancake. I experiment with ways to correct this, and settled on extra cloth in the crotch on the side of the round one. This way the cloth over both draped the same without hugging and, unless yuu were grabbing me, which I'm not opposed to, the cheek drape appeared even.

This is mentioned because while determining all this the crotch was opened and I found I could hike the pant to true waist without junk crush. They looked good, they felt good, except the crotch was air conditioned. So cloth wedges were sewn in to close the open door, one for each side, the one covering the larger cheek slightly larger. To give you an idea of how much is covered, the wedge is in the form of a right triangle. The base c. 2", the length being 3-4". If you draw a diagonal line through yuur smart phone screen, you will see the real size and the real shape of BOTH inserts, which includes seam allowances. So you can see the inserts are quite small. Yet they give you a belly button rise. Medium to high. You can't do low to high because the zipper is too short.

The above came to me in a dream long ago featuring your grandmother.
 
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