Thoughts on Shell #8 Color for wearability?

Discussion in 'Andy's Trad Forum' started by At Law, Apr 26, 2019.

  1. richard warren

    richard warren Active Member with Corp. Privileges

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  2. Mike Petrik

    Mike Petrik Honors Member

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  3. TimF

    TimF Active Member with Corp. Privileges

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    For me, derby has seams that run from the lacing to the sole on each side. Blucher does not. Small difference, but I guess lack of that seam makes bluchers a cleaner shoe, hence slightly more formal. In this day and age, just go with whatever fits you best and your preferred look.
     
  4. New Old Stock

    New Old Stock Active Member with Corp. Privileges

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    If you asked anyone outside of this forum they'd just call everything "dress shoes" - at least here in the States.

    My understanding (and the link provided above seems to agree) is that all Bluchers are Derbys, but not all Derbys are Bluchers. The AE Leeds being a good example of a Blucher. Though the AE website titles them Derbys, they label them Bluchers in the description.

    The link left out the distinction between Oxfords & Balmorals, though. As I understand it all Balmorals are Oxfords, but not all Oxfords are Balmorals.
    Balmorals have a galosh vamp that meets at the heel, never covering the quarters or facing completely. Its similar to an Adelaide Oxford (or 'Gary' Oxford according to C&J), but in that case the vamp creates a U-shape around the closed lacing, covering the quarters completely.

    Balmoral:
    Balmoral.jpg

    Adelaide:
    Adelaide.jpg
     
  5. Mike Petrik

    Mike Petrik Honors Member

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    Ok so .....

    With respect to open-laced shoes, the term derby predominates in the UK whereas Americans generally use the term blucher; and at least in the U.S. both terms are often used interchangeably to describe shoes with open lace systems. Technically, however, the derby has 2 quarters that are sewn together and a vamp with a tongue, whereas the blucher has small pieces of leather sewn onto the vamp creating the lacing system.

    The Adelaide above is a wholecut, which most gents would consider a type of balmoral given the closed lacing, but technically the wholecut is also considered its own closed-lace style distinct from the balmoral. So based on what I'm now reading:

    Open-laced shoes can be derbies or bluchers.
    Closed-laced shoes can be bals or wholecuts.

    No doubt there is more to this, but I'm already learning a lot I didn't know thanks to Richard and NOS.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019
  6. New Old Stock

    New Old Stock Active Member with Corp. Privileges

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    The Adelaide above isn't a Wholecut, its laces are a separate piece. All of them are Oxfords, including the Balmoral.

    Genus: Oxford.
    Species: Adelaide, Balmoral, Wholecut...
    *this is how I understand it, I'd wait for a more experienced member to confirm this before committing it to memory.

    This guide was informative:
    https://www.crockettandjones.com/style-guide/

    Other way around.
     
  7. Mike Petrik

    Mike Petrik Honors Member

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    Yes, fixed. Not the first time my brain said one thing and my fingers typed another. And thanks for your other clarification.
     
  8. richard warren

    richard warren Active Member with Corp. Privileges

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