dbueche

Starting Member
Back in the 70's, my grandfather, who dealt in antiques, gave me a vintage charcoal wool vest with three very low buttons close together and 4" from the bottom of the vest. It's lapels were solid charcoal Paisley patterned silk, the lapels widening, and rounded at the bottom just above the first button.

What is this vest style called, and where might I find such an item today? I attached a very rough sketch below. The entire vest was charcoal, even the silk lapels. The Paisley on the lapels was in the weave.

Also, what is the name of the style of bowtie worn by Lincoln in pictures where the bow is no wider than the knot?

Screenshot_20200710-162655.png
 

Flanderian

Connoisseur
Back in the 70's, my grandfather, who dealt in antiques, gave me a vintage charcoal wool vest with three very low buttons close together and 4" from the bottom of the vest. It's lapels were solid charcoal Paisley patterned silk, the lapels widening, and rounded at the bottom just above the first button.

What is this vest style called, and where might I find such an item today? I attached a very rough sketch below. The entire vest was charcoal, even the silk lapels. The Paisley on the lapels was in the weave.

Also, what is the name of the style of bowtie worn by Lincoln in pictures where the bow is no wider than the knot?

View attachment 46668
If it has a specific separate name, I don't know it. But vests cut in this manner are typically worn as part of semi formal evening dress. (Black Tie/Tuxdeo). Though evening dress is more often black or midnight, rather than charcoal. The brocade lapels would be consistent with such wear. But I'm speaking from the perspective of American dress. if your grandpa come from a different cultural tradition, it many have been worn differently. And fashions change over time, so I guess if it predates the 1930's, it may have been worn more broadly.

I don't have a specific source, but if you search the net long enough, you might be able to find something similar.

Though from a later date, very narrow bowties which were about the same width all the way across were most known as bar shaped, or just bar bowties.
 
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